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Old 12-09-2019, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Vienna, VA
410 posts, read 192,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
Not true for most who sail - though I would agree in re: luxury yachts and fishing boats. Actually, I wouldn't even buy the latter.
Some fishing boats hold their value pretty well. My father sold his Boston Whaler for not much less than he paid for it over 20 years later. Was pretty cheap to own as well, it had a Honda outboard and typical Honda reliability.
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Old 12-09-2019, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Ohio
20,899 posts, read 14,808,128 times
Reputation: 17187
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrxalleycat View Post
Yachts : Do these boats depreciate in value?
Depends on the type. You know, there are sailing yachts, and then there are throat-warbler mangroves (pronounced "luxury yachts").

You do understand the market for yachts is global, not local (or State or regional or US), right?

If you have a sailing yacht, you'll do better with one that has an inboard motor.

I have sailboat (not a yacht), but I still have an inboard, because, you know, it's hard to sail after a bottle of Metaxa or Ouzo.

First time I went through the Dardanelles, I didn't know you weren't supposed to over-take other boats. So I'm cruising about 12 knots and passing boats and the Turkish navy came out and yelled at me. I just dropped the sails, cranked up the inboard and set it at 5 knots. No problem.
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Old 12-09-2019, 05:17 PM
Status: "Not My Circus - Not My Monkeys" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: San Francisco
3,121 posts, read 773,367 times
Reputation: 1853
Quote:
Originally Posted by 22003yo View Post
Some fishing boats hold their value pretty well. My father sold his Boston Whaler for not much less than he paid for it over 20 years later. Was pretty cheap to own as well, it had a Honda outboard and typical Honda reliability.
I don't know why you quoted me on this comment. I stated I enjoyed sailing (and don't care about the depreciation in re: a racing yacht as one shouldn't mix business with pleasure. :-)

I'd never purchase a luxury yacht or fishing boat, but I'm glad your Dad enjoyed his for twenty years.
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Old 12-10-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,934 posts, read 6,710,810 times
Reputation: 12613
Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
Racing yachts aren't (though they still do depreciate). A 'yacht' is simply a pleasure boat (luxury or racing) - it can be powered or not, though many prefer to use the term sailboat when it isn't (especially if it's of smaller size).
That's a valid point but when I think of the term "Yacht" i think of a pleasure boat that's big enough that one generally couldn't trailer it and is big enough to comfortably "live" on for leisure.

And even without the maintenance on the power plants that a large cruiser would have, I'd imagine that many of the other expenses are there on a 90 ft Hinckley compared to say a 90 ft Hatteras. Dockage, yard bills, the ice makers and water systems and AC, etc...
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Old 12-10-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,354 posts, read 3,134,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
That's a valid point but when I think of the term "Yacht" i think of a pleasure boat that's big enough that one generally couldn't trailer it and is big enough to comfortably "live" on for leisure.

And even without the maintenance on the power plants that a large cruiser would have, I'd imagine that many of the other expenses are there on a 90 ft Hinckley compared to say a 90 ft Hatteras. Dockage, yard bills, the ice makers and water systems and AC, etc...
Bigger rigs are definitely a rich person's game. Worked on a 64 and a 65 Viking sportfish. Both had 4 staterooms, 5 AC units, 3 heads, sub zero refrigeration in galley plus built in freezers in the pit and up on the bridge. Props and shafts add to the mix. Bilge pumps, water pumps, water makers, etc...Then the computer systems, a couple hundred grand in electronics, two steering stations (bridge and tower), and on and on and on. All requiring maintenance and repair. Then there are the motors (1800 horses in MTU16's or C32A CATS. Those rigs move at 34 knots cruise so needless to say they take a beating. especially the 64 which was a dealer demo in which we had instructions during the tournament's not to get passed. But of course there are customs that would blow by us like we were standing still.

Yep, expensive toys. Even if they don't drop down that much in price ( many don't want to wait for a build slot to open which can be several years wait on a custom rig like those out of North Carolina) the cost of maintenance will take a big chunk out of ones bank account.

I have always said that if one of those rigs was given away, a normal person would not be able to afford it, even if it was never moved! I know I sure couldn't!
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Old 12-10-2019, 09:22 PM
Status: "Not My Circus - Not My Monkeys" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: San Francisco
3,121 posts, read 773,367 times
Reputation: 1853
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
That's a valid point but when I think of the term "Yacht" i think of a pleasure boat that's big enough that one generally couldn't trailer it and is big enough to comfortably "live" on for leisure.
Yeah - most think in those terms; but it's not all about 'luxury/living'. The YRA (Yacht Racing Association) of San Francisco Bay represents a huge presence here.
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Old 12-11-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,934 posts, read 6,710,810 times
Reputation: 12613
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post
Bigger rigs are definitely a rich person's game. Worked on a 64 and a 65 Viking sportfish. Both had 4 staterooms, 5 AC units, 3 heads, sub zero refrigeration in galley plus built in freezers in the pit and up on the bridge. Props and shafts add to the mix. Bilge pumps, water pumps, water makers, etc...Then the computer systems, a couple hundred grand in electronics, two steering stations (bridge and tower), and on and on and on. All requiring maintenance and repair. Then there are the motors (1800 horses in MTU16's or C32A CATS. Those rigs move at 34 knots cruise so needless to say they take a beating. especially the 64 which was a dealer demo in which we had instructions during the tournament's not to get passed. But of course there are customs that would blow by us like we were standing still.

Yep, expensive toys. Even if they don't drop down that much in price ( many don't want to wait for a build slot to open which can be several years wait on a custom rig like those out of North Carolina) the cost of maintenance will take a big chunk out of ones bank account.

I have always said that if one of those rigs was given away, a normal person would not be able to afford it, even if it was never moved! I know I sure couldn't!
Someone said that when you get into the Sportfisher world, expect $1K/foot a year. Which sounds crazy as someone who is used to 18-22 foot outboard boats, but just thinking of what you'd pay a yard to haul and bottom paint it, maybe not so crazy.
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Old 12-11-2019, 11:36 AM
 
6,155 posts, read 7,029,518 times
Reputation: 15959
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlinfshr View Post

I have always said that if one of those rigs was given away, a normal person would not be able to afford it, even if it was never moved!

That pretty much nails it.

I can tell you from experience that the upkeep--just basic stuff--is staggeringly expensive (for example, as soon as you say "marine" the price automatically doubles).


Insurance, dockage, hauling, blocking, cleaning and stabilizing before you even hit the water will drain an average person pretty quickly.


Back in the day you could take the yacht as a second home deduction. That helped, but still...unless you can figure a corporate write off, your bank account will suffer a substantial annual breath-taking blow.


Want to buy a yacht? Wait for an economic downturn and you will see people puking these up for ANY price just to get rid of them. Not the really big stuff (over 100') where the truly wealthy hang out, but from 30 to 60 or 70 feet that are owned by the average person who had a couple of good years, bought a boat, and now can't handle the upkeep, let alone the mortgage.
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Old 12-12-2019, 03:43 AM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
2,354 posts, read 3,134,585 times
Reputation: 4155
Offshore fishing and the tournament circuit was my career for close to 30 years. Now its boat detailing and owner/operator of a 21 foot inshore skiff. I worked for a couple boat dealers on their demo programs through the mid 1000's. You are correct in that the mid sized boats are the first to get hit in an economic down turn. The end of the decade put boat builders and dealers to the test. In those years the only ones really being sold were the mid seventy plus foot Vikings and the hot customs out of Carolina, (but the custom builders were pretty much only building 60 plus footers and only 1 at a time)

The 65 I was on for 2 years (2002/2004) cost about 500 grand a year to operate. Now that went from the Mid Atlantic to Venezuela, on to Costa Rica and Cabo and back. I think the 64 was about the same but it only went from NY to Costa Rica.

I like my little skiff. Max I would be out would be about 10 grand if the motor went. Of course that single little 115 Suzuki to me is probably like a pair of MTU16's to those who own these larger boats.

My one bosses 65 to him (he didn't use it much) was like me having a canoe leaning up against my shed, hardly ever being used.
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Old 12-13-2019, 04:33 AM
 
15,560 posts, read 8,382,686 times
Reputation: 28156
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
Someone said that when you get into the Sportfisher world, expect $1K/foot a year. Which sounds crazy as someone who is used to 18-22 foot outboard boats, but just thinking of what you'd pay a yard to haul and bottom paint it, maybe not so crazy.
The cost per foot isn’t linear. Cost is better related to displacement than length.
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