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Old 12-26-2019, 10:00 PM
 
7,441 posts, read 2,282,480 times
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Doesn't it seem as if all we do is tweak?

What Baby Yoda, OK Boomer and Hemp Farming Told Us About the 2019 Economy
By Jeanna Smialek

Productivity growth has been stuck throughout the decade, and failed to break out in a lasting way this year. One explanation, championed by Northwestern University economist Robert Gordon, is that prior-century inventions like washing machines transformed the way the world works. Now innovators are left making derivative improvements or less life-altering technologies. Society can’t reinvent running water or the refrigerator any more than Hollywood can outdo the Force.

https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other...omy/ar-BBYim8P
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Old 12-29-2019, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,590 posts, read 5,285,596 times
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I find it interesting how Netflix was the number one stock of the decade. Not a medical breakthrough, not a supercomputer, not artificial intelligence, not a life-changing energy source, not a revolutionary new form of transportation or even smartphones. No, the most rewarded idea was the ability to sit on your couch and click on a movie. That is what the market valued the most.
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Old Today, 06:01 PM
 
7,441 posts, read 2,282,480 times
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Exactly. Very few "breakthroughs" in the way there were maybe a century ago.
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Old Today, 06:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
No, the most rewarded idea was the ability to sit on your couch and click on a movie. That is what the market valued the most.
To me, this IS a "disruptor" although there are others that follow the Netflix business model. I bought Comcast in the early 1980s. I once figured my cost basis at $2.25/share. (It split a lot.) It hit 40 or 50 before the dotcom bust and it's at $47.50 now. Fortunately I have only a few shares left. Remember when EVERYONE had to have cable? Remember how everybody complained as the cable companies got fat, dumb and happy "bundling" channels into overpriced packages so if you wanted HBO or Nickelodeon you had to get The Broccoli Channel and QVC? Remember how commercials crept back into "pay TV"?

And now we have options. In my case, it's Netflix only and I'm a happy camper despite the increase form $10/month to $13/month last year.
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