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Old 06-21-2020, 03:29 PM
 
80,258 posts, read 78,608,722 times
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Most small towns I know of aren't dying, they just aren't rapidly growing. Most have stable populations. Only Mississippi River delta and former Appalachian coal mining counties / towns are loosing enough population to be considered dying. Cities have extremes of income, the richest and poorest people live there. Rural areas tend to be overwhelmingly middle class with few on either extreme. They have jobs in farming and local govt / healthcare that are quite stable during recessions.

When cost of living was more similar across the USA it was more apples to apples comparison to talk about ciites having far more job opportunities. But with a starter home in the largest metro areas going for 500k to over 1 million even the extra income you'd make by living there leaves you no better off than making $12 an hour in a small town.
Metro areas like here In nyc offer coop apartments for those on the lower end of things. All our kids started off buyers by coops before they could afford homes Us too we bought a coop back in the 1980s before we could afford a home I can say my own growth potential was far greater here then where we had a second home in the poconos
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Old Today, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
27,631 posts, read 20,628,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Most small towns I know of aren't dying, they just aren't rapidly growing. Most have stable populations. Only Mississippi River delta and former Appalachian coal mining counties / towns are loosing enough population to be considered dying. Cities have extremes of income, the richest and poorest people live there. Rural areas tend to be overwhelmingly middle class with few on either extreme. They have jobs in farming and local govt / healthcare that are quite stable during recessions.

When cost of living was more similar across the USA it was more apples to apples comparison to talk about ciites having far more job opportunities. But with a starter home in the largest metro areas going for 500k to over 1 million even the extra income you'd make by living there leaves you no better off than making $12 an hour in a small town.
In many cases, those small towns and rural areas that do have the government/healthcare employment base often have lower wages, even adjusted for the local cost of living.

If I'm making $35k here vs. $60k in Charlotte for the same job, and my cost of living only goes up by 20%, I'm better off in Charlotte. That's not even mentioning that small towns may only have a place or two for a p professional to work at. If something happens to that job, you are moving.
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