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Old 05-15-2020, 11:39 PM
 
1,977 posts, read 503,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie the heartbreaker View Post
This qualifies as social unrest in the great depression.
Well, that accounts for about 50 people, yes...
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
6,384 posts, read 4,326,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Therblig View Post
Such as? One of the hallmarks of that event was the largely passive response of Americans. There was no point in struggle or conflict because no one had anything.

Some labor unrest, but with thousands chasing every job trying to be first in line at the gate each morning was more important. Some violence against Okies, which is why most of them continued on to California.
Not everywhere but there were spot situations. Off the top of my head,

West coast waterfront strike that started led to the San Francisco general strike in1934.

Ford hunger march 1932, Detroit

Auto-lite Strike, Toledo, 1934

National guard had to be called up for this stuff.
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:27 AM
 
1,977 posts, read 503,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Not everywhere but there were spot situations.
It would not seem there was any more general unrest during the depression (1930-35 or so) than in any other time in the first half of the century. And none particularly memorable other than perhaps San Francisco.

Which is remarkable, given the desperate straits most of the country and other nations were in. My point is that 'being hungry' does not lead to mass riots or the like unless it's very localized and 'there's food just over the fence.' There wasn't in the 1930s, and we're in much the same situation now. There is no better place at the moment; what's to agitate for?
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Heart of flyover America
643 posts, read 255,042 times
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Looking at home prices and rents in various cities.

Nope, no "deflation" whatsoever there.
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Old 05-16-2020, 09:42 AM
 
1,977 posts, read 503,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taggerung View Post
Looking at home prices and rents in various cities.

Nope, no "deflation" whatsoever there.
It's been two months. More or less. Sheer shock has prevented any changes in markets that aren't tracked by the minute.
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Old 05-16-2020, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
6,384 posts, read 4,326,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Therblig View Post
It would not seem there was any more general unrest during the depression (1930-35 or so) than in any other time in the first half of the century. And none particularly memorable other than perhaps San Francisco.

Which is remarkable, given the desperate straits most of the country and other nations were in. My point is that 'being hungry' does not lead to mass riots or the like unless it's very localized and 'there's food just over the fence.' There wasn't in the 1930s, and we're in much the same situation now. There is no better place at the moment; what's to agitate for?
Just remembered "Bloody Harlan" 1934. The Kentucky governor had to call out the national guard for that one for that one too.

The Bonus Army march. That resulted in something like 6 deaths. Another callup of the Army situation.

It was worse. The previously comparable time would have been the early 1890s which had its own depression. But in the 1930s there was actual communist agitation, popularity of demagogues like Huey Long etc...

In today's media environment, even one incident where the national guard had to be called up & there was a death would be shocking.
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Old 05-16-2020, 10:46 AM
 
80,180 posts, read 78,518,791 times
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I can never understand the obsession with the stuff that happened in a different world in a different era .

History never repeats itself exactly enough to make a darn ...only historians repeat themselves , history never does .....

Each time things play out or are triggered by things just different enough that whatever you thought was so sure to play out Because of history will be just different enough to make things not work out the way you thought
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Old 05-16-2020, 11:22 AM
 
1,977 posts, read 503,478 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
I can never understand the obsession with the stuff that happened in a different world in a different era .

History never repeats itself exactly enough to make a darn ...only historians repeat themselves , history never does .....

Each time things play out or are triggered by things just different enough that whatever you thought was so sure to play out Because of history will be just different enough to make things not work out the way you thought
Yes, so you've repeated several times. You can stop rubber-stamping the notion around. No one with an ounce of actual historical understanding interprets it as literally as you imply.

There's a difference between some sort of stuck-robot auto-repeat, and the repeat of a situation that among other things, can be better analyzed and addressed by understanding past iterations.

A depression in more or less modern America is a depression: there are lessons from the past ones that can help us understand and blunt this one.
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Old 05-16-2020, 11:31 AM
 
1,910 posts, read 708,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happs View Post
Why aren't prices on most goods and services rapidly declining during this pandemic? With high unemployment rates and low stock market indexes compared to January 2020, one would assume that consumers have less disposable income. It seems however that prices are holding steady to increasing.
I've read that the stimulus $$, having gone to almost everyone, was not spent for consumables as much as it went to savings or paying down debt.

Plus, many folks like me whose income was uninterrupted are saving more than ever because there's no place to spend it even if you want to.
I'm just now restarting a full, down to studs bathroom renovation that was postponed in March, so give it some time before we see whether prices go down or up.
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Old 05-16-2020, 11:35 AM
 
Location: It's in the name!
6,277 posts, read 7,467,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
Plus, many folks like me whose income was uninterrupted are saving more than ever because there's no place to spend it even if you want to.
I am not sure where you live or if you have internet. I assume you have internet access at home. We have had no problem spending money. Even if we DIDN'T want to.

Stores are still open. Home Depot, Costco, Target, etc. Not even considering online retailing and restaurant delivery services.

Unless you live on an island, spending money is not an issue. WE're even considering upgrading our bed to a sleep number bed with the next stimulus payments.
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