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Old 06-18-2020, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Riverside Ca
20,929 posts, read 23,361,130 times
Reputation: 32282

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
Three words: Universal Basic Income ($1,000 a month) for all citizens making less then $75,000 a year or $100,000 a year in higher COL areas like the Tri-State area or San Francisco Bay area.
Basic income I believe is for everyone regardless of wages earned. Hey go ahead and give it to everyone. The only thing that’s gonna happen is.....everything will just get more expensive. But hey between myself and my wife I’ll have my house paid off in 6 years. Cause I’ll be dumping that 2k a month along with my payment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mizzourah2006 View Post
We either you grocery pickup or self-checkout. I can't remember the last time I've used a cashier.

Ok that’s you. If I have the option I’ll have a human do the checking

Quote:
Originally Posted by ihatetodust View Post
I would not miss cashiers. Most of them look at you like you are interrupting them by being in their line. I don't exactly blame them - it is probably not much fun to stand there all day.

Not my stores. Everyone is nice and helpful. Two weeks ago my wife and I bought lunch for the crew at my local supermarket


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill the Butcher View Post
The average person, myself included, procrastinates or is disorganized way too much to do all their shopping on-line.
I know exactly what I’m shopping for online. And in the store. To each his own. I have saved a ton of money shopping online. Certain things I stil go in to get


Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
You'll have to find other thrills; you can't avoid technology. Amazon Go stores charge you (via an app) as you walk out the door with the item(s).
Yeah I worked with a guy who was working on that tech along with license plate reader cameras. Sure eventually I won’t have a choice. Until then......
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Old 06-18-2020, 12:24 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 555,926 times
Reputation: 3332
It's been a long time coming, and as I've noted repeatedly, the virus crisis is going to kick the whole timeline ahead by several years. Expect the retail world to be very different by next summer—not just reactive to what's happening, but skipping an evolutionary phase or two.

But also keep in mind that things like self checkout and its successors don't have all that much to do with reducing staff and staff costs. That's (some) immediate gravy, yes. But it's not the reason and not what's driving the effort. For one thing, stores will need almost as many "front counter" people for a long time to watch and assist shoppers checking out. (Especially for stores like Walmart that have a policy of seeking the death penalty for pocketing a candy bar.) There's almost no immediate (2-3 year) savings in front line staff, and those that remain will have to be of a slightly higher caliber than most checkers. Vague notions of a superstore staffed by four people are, for any foreseeable future, nonsense.

Yes, the reduction in staff is used as a carrot for the dumber participants, since that's all they understand while being solicited to install three payroll-years' worth of equipment to replace them people things. And it's what's obsessing most econ discussion that hasn't gotten past the Foreword yet.

But deeper in, there are two things going on here that drive SCO and "automated checkout" and so forth.

The first is the impending collapse of the service sector in general. It won't disappear overnight, but there is going to be a long dismal twilight in which stores can't afford to cut (customer) capacity but can't afford to provide it with full human staff, either (things like checkout being service-within-a-service, in many cases). The automation will make it easier to keep a store open with a steadily reducing staff, until the change is so great they have to restructure the business completely. (Many will simply go out of business, eventually.)

The second reason for SCO/ACO is a more subtle progression of a problem retail has been trying to eliminate since Oog sold rocks and sticks to the tribe. The checkout is the last barrier to consumer spending, and the effort for decades has been to reduce it to invisibility, minimal delay and interaction and as little awareness and thought by the consumer as possible. You no longer chat with the nice saleslady at Macy's about the party you're going to wear this outfit to; you go from a handful of store possessions to a bag of owned goods in the blink of an eye, a painless magic trick that keeps you from really considering the total.

SCO is something of a distraction, busying you with the task so that you just want to get done; you don't even get that minute of idle rest while the checker does it. And if the total registers on you, it's of less importance than getting the frack out of the place.

And the next step, Automated Checkout, ACO, like Amazon's feeble "Amazon Go" store concept... that removes even the last barrier to thinking about purchases and acquisitions. Retail has been trying to implement this for fifty years, with evolving barcode and RFID and other technologies. Now, with micro-tracking of consumer identity and action, it's within implementation. It won't even need a supervisory front staff since shoplifting will be next to impossible; you already can't pass items from the belt to your bags without the system catching it.

So the steady increase of SCO was always heading towards totality, with most stores allowing problematic transactions at a customer service counter; that Wallymart is ready to take the plunge is simply a year or two ahead of schedule. And not really about reducing staff, not in the immediate or near future. Don't get lost chasing that red herring.
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Old 06-18-2020, 01:46 PM
 
3,586 posts, read 2,268,084 times
Reputation: 8093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
Walmart's problem is that they are just another big box retailer, that can't comprehend that brick and mortar is obsolete. So like other big boxes they are frantically trying to find a solution to prop up their failing business model. Walmart is going out of business. They just don't know it. There are a lot of other dominoes that have to fall first, but eventually it will get to Walmart.

If Walmart was smart, they would close all of their stores, and convert every single one of them to fulfillment centers, and go head to head with Amazon. With 4,700 warehouses to 100 for Amazon, they could easily beat Amazon at their own game. They could offer 2 hour delivery in areas Amazon couldn't even dream of.

But instead they will do what other companies do, and continue to try to figure out a way to save their retail stores, at the expense of their online operations.
What?

Walmart is heavily shifting towards online and investing. They’ve stood up to Amazon the best.
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Old 06-18-2020, 02:18 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 555,926 times
Reputation: 3332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
And the slow pace of the cashiers is okay with Walmart too. Because they are hoping you will get tired of the slow checkout and go use the self checkout instead.
I've observed this in more than one store. My working theory is that it's half "put our slowest check/box teams on the registers, to drive people to SCO"... and half a seniority thing, in that the longest-tenured checkers are retained while the newer-comers are reduced and RIFfed. Anyone who's been a checker for Walmart, Sam's, even Costco for years is going to be one of those plodding drones who couldn't move faster if you shot a murder hornet at them.
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Old 06-18-2020, 02:26 PM
 
4,559 posts, read 3,409,010 times
Reputation: 4416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatsright19 View Post
What?

Walmart is heavily shifting towards online and investing. They’ve stood up to Amazon the best.
They stood up to Amazon by purchasing Jet Blue. Wal-Mart's website was horrendous before the purchase. I'd argue Wal-Mart's site is as good as Amazon's now. I use the Wal-Mart website to search in-store availability. I purchase so little when I visit Wal-Mart that I haven't felt grocery pick-up suits me just yet.

Wal-Mart pushed hard for grocery pickup after Amazon purchased Whole Foods. Although they had been testing grocery pickup in Bentonville, AR for years. Amazon motivated Wal-Mart to pivot and change how they conducted business. Wal-Mart is the main retailer in rural areas. Where I live, it's Wal-Mart, Harps, a local grocery chain, and Aldi's.

We have nothing that resembles a Publix, Trader Joe's, etc.
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Old 06-18-2020, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Metropolis IL
1,680 posts, read 2,033,807 times
Reputation: 2558
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
It is not just those items that are difficult. Items with no bar code like fruit/veggies inevitably mess up on the self scan. I would say I have about a 75% failure rate where it thinks I am trying to put an extra item into the bag. It also has issues when you don’t put the item onto the bagging area at all, which sometimes I don’t want to do with an item that is heavy like a 24-pack of cans or water or other bulky items it makes more sense to scan in the cart and leave there.
And once you mess up, you can't correct the issue, and have to summon a disgruntled "associate" to type in the secret code.
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Old 06-18-2020, 03:49 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 555,926 times
Reputation: 3332
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLS2753 View Post
And once you mess up, you can't correct the issue, and have to summon a disgruntled "associate" to type in the secret code.
But we're fortunate in that grocery stores sell only small, one-hand items that can easily be passed from basket to scanner to bag. It'd be a PITA if any of them were large, or unwieldy, or if there was no place to set them, like jugs of bleach, cases of soda... and setting them back in the cart would set off all kinds of obnoxious robo-demands...
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Old 06-18-2020, 05:07 PM
 
955 posts, read 1,075,770 times
Reputation: 1417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Therblig View Post
But we're fortunate in that grocery stores sell only small, one-hand items that can easily be passed from basket to scanner to bag. It'd be a PITA if any of them were large, or unwieldy, or if there was no place to set them, like jugs of bleach, cases of soda... and setting them back in the cart would set off all kinds of obnoxious robo-demands...
You guys sound like 2010 to me. My walmart and local grocery stores have had wireless scanners for 2-3 years. No need to move anything big or bulky. After you scan an item you have an option to press a button that says something along the lines of "dont bag this item" which takes care of the error messages in regards to weight.

I exclusively use self checkout any chance I can because the lines are shorter since everyone has a morality crisis when checking out yet they're probably the same one that shop at Amazon Instead of mom and pop places.
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Old 06-18-2020, 05:21 PM
 
251 posts, read 56,908 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by weezerfan84 View Post
They stood up to Amazon by purchasing Jet Blue. Wal-Mart's website was horrendous before the purchase. I'd argue Wal-Mart's site is as good as Amazon's now. I use the Wal-Mart website to search in-store availability. I purchase so little when I visit Wal-Mart that I haven't felt grocery pick-up suits me just yet.

Wal-Mart pushed hard for grocery pickup after Amazon purchased Whole Foods. Although they had been testing grocery pickup in Bentonville, AR for years. Amazon motivated Wal-Mart to pivot and change how they conducted business. Wal-Mart is the main retailer in rural areas. Where I live, it's Wal-Mart, Harps, a local grocery chain, and Aldi's.

We have nothing that resembles a Publix, Trader Joe's, etc.
WMT website is no comparison to AMZN ,WMT spent a lot of money buying Jet Blue as they are not well versed into ecommerce,so they think Jet Blue can take on AMZN.
Now they know better,they hire an Indian PHD who used to work for GOOGLE,MSFT and AMZN and he is now reporting to the CEO .
Wmt is now partnering with Shopify,cant recall all the details,
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Old 06-18-2020, 05:24 PM
 
251 posts, read 56,908 times
Reputation: 167
All these brick and mortar companies did not catch on at first,they think it is child play,sitting in front of your PC and buy a few things,do some chatting.
When Kroger first held a meeting to talk about setting up a website,some of the attendees left the room,where are they now?
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