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Old 04-25-2022, 12:16 AM
 
8 posts, read 6,963 times
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Asking for my son. Finance seems likely dead with AI taking over that section in near future. His his original goal was Engineering, but seems like a heavy load with college ball and 15 hours of work study a week. Thoughts?
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Old 04-25-2022, 02:56 AM
 
106,594 posts, read 108,739,314 times
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Sure it is , this way when one is out of work they understand why.

I don’t see much demand today

Last edited by mathjak107; 04-25-2022 at 03:40 AM..
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Old 04-25-2022, 08:15 AM
 
Location: USA
9,114 posts, read 6,160,628 times
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It's not the degree; it's how you intend to use the degree. In studying economics you have to employ many different skills, but especially quantitative analytical ones. Many people who have a background in Economics develop complex quantitative models for financial markets.

Common career paths for economics graduates include:
  • Economist
  • Financial risk analyst
  • Data analyst
  • Financial planner
  • Accountant
  • Economic researcher
  • Financial consultant
  • Investment analyst
  • Actuary
  • Public sector roles


https://www.topuniversities.com/stud...onomics-degree



Skills for Economics Majors
The skills you gain from studying economics are invaluable in an era where companies are increasingly looking for candidates with a quantitative background. Your economics studies will give you tools that are highly desirable in the workplace, such as:
  • Data analysis
  • Mathematics
  • Quantitative reasoning
  • Critical thinking
  • Knowledge of how markets operate
  • An understanding of business


https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/guide...nomics-majors/
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:12 AM
 
5,527 posts, read 3,248,594 times
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Economics is a good degree if your school does not offer an undergraduate business program and it's a target school. At these places the economics department is a feeder to financial careers.

Target schools are high end schools that Wall Street recruits from. They are household names and you would probably know if you're attending one.

If not in the situation above, an economics degree can be used in some business functions but ideally should be combined with a math minor or double major.
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:16 AM
 
19,776 posts, read 18,060,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenHunt View Post
Asking for my son. Finance seems likely dead with AI taking over that section in near future. His his original goal was Engineering, but seems like a heavy load with college ball and 15 hours of work study a week. Thoughts?
Econ. Ph.D here.

1. Finance as a degree field is not dead or dying anytime soon.

2. Per BS/BA degrees many colleges offer several several econ. degrees. From very math heavy, a few are actually through math departments, to what amount to almost pure social science degrees. IMO avoid the later unless the kid is simply looking for a lever into law or MBA school or the FBI etc.

3. Formal econ. is really tough for most people because it's half or two thirds math and analytically driven and half or one third soft science....plus many concepts in econ. are counter intuitive. Surprisingly few people are strong enough in both areas to thrive. Finance is tough but it's much more straightforward.

4. Get on the internet and buy or find excepts from one of Greg Mankiw's (Harvard) microeconomics textbooks.
Don't expect your kid to comfortably understand much. However, if he's interested that a good sign. If he's horrified that's also valuable. Do keep in mind micro tho. is the toughest broad area in economics for undergrads.

5. Econ. also attracts a bunch of eggheads, geniuses plus math and physics wonks. IOW it's stupid competitive as one moves up the ladder, but most undergrad programs are at least tolerable.
Economics students are just behind medical, math and physics types in GRE score and IQ results. It's tough.




Mankiw's blog......

Greg Mankiw's Blog
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:26 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,550 posts, read 81,103,317 times
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I've only known one person with a degree in Economics, and I hired her in 2010. She retired last fall making about $90,000, which is not that great for this area, but she enjoyed what she was doing. Most of her career was utility rate analysis with several public agencies. The person I replaced her with has a degree in Finance.
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:31 AM
 
19,776 posts, read 18,060,308 times
Reputation: 17262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avondalist View Post
Economics is a good degree if your school does not offer an undergraduate business program and it's a target school. At these places the economics department is a feeder to financial careers.

Target schools are high end schools that Wall Street recruits from. They are household names and you would probably know if you're attending one.

If not in the situation above, an economics degree can be used in some business functions but ideally should be combined with a math minor or double major.
I don't agree with much of this but especially disagree with the target school bit. To whatever degree the claim is true it's never been less true. Many big Wall Street players have been de-New Yorking for a good while and recruit much more broadly now. And the overwhelming majority of great econ. careers do not start on Wall Street.
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:35 AM
 
129 posts, read 107,669 times
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I have an undergrad degree in economics from a state school and work in commercial banking as a credit analyst. I like my job and get paid well.
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:38 AM
 
129 posts, read 107,669 times
Reputation: 362
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
Sure it is , this way when one is out of work they understand why.

I don’t see much demand today
Really? Economics is very broad and can get you a plethora of different jobs/industries.
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Old 04-25-2022, 09:50 AM
 
1,766 posts, read 1,222,834 times
Reputation: 2904
eCONnomist are Con Man. That degree is WORTHLESS and those guys are a nothing but a joke. No eCONomist ever seems to be able to explain what is going on today, or tell you what will happen tomorrow. Most of them are just PAID SHILLS working for different industries and who can't predict anything right, from the financial crisis to the recent stock market highs.

Good Luck!
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