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Old 06-27-2008, 12:18 PM
 
6,342 posts, read 8,957,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilnewbie View Post
You be surprise the amount of people who argue that all people in suburbs should live in the city... imagine those brownstones tripling in cost at the very least... I think the same people would rather the people in suburbs move to live in a studio apartment in the city and pay the same in mortgage... how nice of them isn't it..

Like I have said, about four times, I am not talking about in the city, but near the city, as in a less than twenty mile commute.
Example: Weehawken NJ is about five millions from NYC and is served by multiple busses. But, houses there are smaller than the McMansions in places further away from the City. In the future, there will be more Weehawkens and less sprawling, one-hour-commute developments.
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:20 PM
 
6,342 posts, read 8,957,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
On the Brownstones in NYC thing. Prices are coming down. In queens alone prices have fallen by 15% so far. Not sure about the other boroughs. So I agree, time will sort all this out.

Prices are falling everywhere because housing has crashed, and NYC is no different.
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:23 PM
 
6,342 posts, read 8,957,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ira500 View Post
If you go up to Seattle, you'll see rapid expansion of Bellevue and skyscrapers being built which is by the "suburbs"

Kind of. When I think of suburbs I think of places where people live and commute to cities for employment, and Bellevue was that way for a long time, but now it's a real city in it's own right, and plenty of people do the reverse commute from Seattle into Bellevue.

Thing is, Bellevue is VERY close to Seattle compared to other suburbs...people in Franklin township NJ commute to NYC, which is about forty miles away. All they needed to do was improve mass-transit through Bellevue and the problem would be solved.
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:27 PM
 
19,098 posts, read 20,668,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victorianpunk View Post
Like I have said, about four times, I am not talking about in the city, but near the city, as in a less than twenty mile commute.
Example: Weehawken NJ is about five millions from NYC and is served by multiple busses. But, houses there are smaller than the McMansions in places further away from the City. In the future, there will be more Weehawkens and less sprawling, one-hour-commute developments.
Weehawkens is a suburb then... you are tyring to separate distant suburbs from close suburbs... they are suburbs just the same. would I rather live in a suburb close to city? Yeah, I can still build a 1 acre lot in a close suburb, why would I want a 1 acre lot far away for?
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Old 06-27-2008, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Chino, CA
1,458 posts, read 3,006,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victorianpunk View Post
Like I have said, about four times, I am not talking about in the city, but near the city, as in a less than twenty mile commute.
Example: Weehawken NJ is about five millions from NYC and is served by multiple busses. But, houses there are smaller than the McMansions in places further away from the City. In the future, there will be more Weehawkens and less sprawling, one-hour-commute developments.

Then we're fine here in LA area ... most of the suburbs are less than twenty miles from any of the job centers. We just need better cars/transit systems. I think in the most part most suburbs are within that distance from job centers.... but, like you said and I agree, the ones that aren't will be either "retirement" villages... or disappear as it gets more difficult to live out there unless businesses move out there (which I think is likely as outlined by the costs - depending on the density and environment around the suburbs).

-chuck22b
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:42 PM
 
148 posts, read 436,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck22b View Post
Then we're fine here in LA area ... most of the suburbs are less than twenty miles from any of the job centers. We just need better cars/transit systems. I think in the most part most suburbs are within that distance from job centers.... but, like you said and I agree, the ones that aren't will be either "retirement" villages... or disappear as it gets more difficult to live out there unless businesses move out there (which I think is likely as outlined by the costs - depending on the density and environment around the suburbs).

-chuck22b
It's our "exurbs" that are taking the hit. That article was pretty accurate in regards to the future for LA, in fact, you can use LA as the perfect example. However, in our case it is not the local suburbs, but the exurbs that will face serious problems.

During the real estate run up, you had the most desirable areas, prime housing real estate along the coasts/beaches, higher elevation/areas with views, and affluent/exclusive neithborhoods continue to fuel demand (along with key commercial/income property and locations), with the nearby alternatives running up as well. This caused a domino effect on nearby but not so good neighborhoods, as the only affordable alternative for the rich-but-not-rich-enough. And so on and so on, until the ghetto areas that saw white flight in the 60's and 70's began to be gentrified, including the inner city and near to downtown areas get gentrified.

Where did the low income and ghetto people that used to live here move to (or get forcibly relocated to?) - the newly (over)built and 'affordable' exurbs of the high desert, San Bernadino, Riverside, etc.
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Old 06-27-2008, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,267,347 times
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Why are cities important anymore in a country where we produce nothing? Once the financial services are allowed to collapse. places like NYC will become a lot less expensive. Suburbs hold a lot of appeal, and if economic collapse causes people to strike down zoning communism, there will be a lot of innovation that will keep the suburban lifestyle afloat. Otherwise I expect ghost towns in areas with only residential or retail space. Those around industrial areas will do fine.
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Old 06-27-2008, 04:23 PM
 
69,360 posts, read 57,147,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TexianPatriot View Post
I'm making a killing in this economy. There's money to be made no matter which way the market goes. COMMODITIES baby!!!
I'm also making a killing in this economy, my exports are through the roof on one company, my consulting business is boombing, my real estate company is buying several properties a month, and my loan investment company has loaned out more money, and made more now then ever in the past..

Always money to be made for those willing to work hard and reinvest.
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Old 06-27-2008, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,933 posts, read 6,975,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Why are cities important anymore in a country where we produce nothing? Once the financial services are allowed to collapse. places like NYC will become a lot less expensive. Suburbs hold a lot of appeal, and if economic collapse causes people to strike down zoning communism, there will be a lot of innovation that will keep the suburban lifestyle afloat. Otherwise I expect ghost towns in areas with only residential or retail space. Those around industrial areas will do fine.
dead on. the rust belt is gunna fire back up and eventually we'll produce our way out of this mess. it's going to be painful decent downward though until we get to that point. all of these major urban financial, insurance, and real estate (FIRE) markets are going to come crashing down. I also see a major emergence of farming over the coming years. It's funny how people want to move closer to the city. My dream is owning a couple thousand acres, running some cattle, hunting, having a 3000 sq ft home, and only going into town once a month for groceries, clothes, ect.
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Old 06-27-2008, 04:41 PM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,766,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilnewbie View Post
No one cares??? You must of miss the motherload of topics concerning McMansion, suburban homes, sprawl, etc etc.. apparently there are many people who do care where I live and apparently from your post, so do you... I am the one that is saying people here and there should NOT care where I live... if a suburban turns into a ghetto, so what?... there are ghettos forming everywhere in urban and suburban places, do you think suburbia should be "immune" to something that happens EVERYWHERE... I suppose there are people who want to add a "suburban" tax because they aren't able to live in suburbia themselves, to them I give the one finger salute and ask them to kindly stay out of my business..
I honestly have no idea what your on about. I assume you "speed read" posts and then respond outlandishly. I could care less where you live. All I have said and continue to say is what I THINK will happen to suburbia.

Doesnt mean I care if it affects a few people or a alot of people. I really don't to be honest. People in America are selifish and self absurbed for the most part. We have a very ME centric society. As a result, the piper must be paid. The only way people will change their bad habits is if they are forced to and these hard times will definitly force change. This next decade is going to be a roller coaster.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TexianPatriot View Post
dead on. the rust belt is gunna fire back up and eventually we'll produce our way out of this mess. it's going to be painful decent downward though until we get to that point. all of these major urban financial, insurance, and real estate (FIRE) markets are going to come crashing down. I also see a major emergence of farming over the coming years. It's funny how people want to move closer to the city. My dream is owning a couple thousand acres, running some cattle, hunting, having a 3000 sq ft home, and only going into town once a month for groceries, clothes, ect.
unless your farm is near a major urban area you sir are going to be in trouble. The days of trucking food in from thousands of miles will soon be at a close
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