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Old 06-27-2008, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,933 posts, read 6,968,030 times
Reputation: 5506

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
I honestly have no idea what your on about. I assume you "speed read" posts and then respond outlandishly. I could care less where you live. All I have said and continue to say is what I THINK will happen to suburbia.

Doesnt mean I care if it affects a few people or a alot of people. I really don't to be honest. People in America are selifish and self absurbed for the most part. We have a very ME centric society. As a result, the piper must be paid. The only way people will change their bad habits is if they are forced to and these hard times will definitly force change. This next decade is going to be a roller coaster.

unless your farm is near a major urban area you sir are going to be in trouble. The days of trucking food in from thousands of miles will soon be at a close
If it gets that bad, I'll just produce for myself and my family. Men aren't meant to live crammed together like sardines. Not me anyway. I'll gladly watch people flock to the cities. Maybe land values will finally fall cheap enough for me to secure a nice place for a reasonable amount of cash. Land ownership=freedom.
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Old 06-27-2008, 05:00 PM
 
69,360 posts, read 57,098,251 times
Reputation: 9371
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Actually you are stealing from the American consumer at the pump. You are a huge part of whats wrong with this economy.

All of that aside, 25% unemployment by Jan 2010 is almost a sure thing.
I havent read anything this funny in years... People who work to make money are stealing from the consumers... ooh yeah.. right..

Lets not even discuss the 25% unemployment prediction, which is higher then the great depression rate..
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Old 06-27-2008, 05:00 PM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,759,702 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexianPatriot View Post
If it gets that bad, I'll just produce for myself and my family. Men aren't meant to live crammed together like sardines. Not me anyway. I'll gladly watch people flock to the cities. Maybe land values will finally fall cheap enough for me to secure a nice place for a reasonable amount of cash. Land ownership=freedom.
Men have been living in cities congested for centuries. Just go to Egypt and look at their old cities. Go to Rome or look at lay outs of ancient Ido (present day Tokyo).

This suburban thing is the thing that's new, not cities and living in close proximity. You did have small villages (which existed along side congested cities) back in the day but, those were self sustaining systems were people provided their own food and had their own industries. Suburbs generally dont have ANY of that. They generally have workers commuting into work and food is trucked in from miles away. It is a extremely inefficient system.

Suburbs need to transform into how old villages used to be (and still are in much of the world). Self contained with the ability to provide for itself.
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Old 06-27-2008, 05:02 PM
 
69,360 posts, read 57,098,251 times
Reputation: 9371
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
unless your farm is near a major urban area you sir are going to be in trouble. The days of trucking food in from thousands of miles will soon be at a close
And your proposing that they will put farms in the middle of downtown NYC? Dont think so. When they continue to truck food in from other countries, I hardly expect trucking it in from the farms in the middle of nowhere is at risk..
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Sitting on a bar stool. Guinness in hand.
4,429 posts, read 5,804,131 times
Reputation: 1708
Look there a couple of possibilities when it comes to where we live in the coming century or so.

1. If we as a country don't force our businesses, government, and ourselves to come up with better individual travel technology then the country is going to look like this. We will have a late 19th early 20th century set up. That is there will be three types of living arrangements (a) cities (b) small towns and (c) farms. All these arrangements allow you to be rather close to where you work and live a lifestyle that will fit your wanted life style.

Cities would probably be the biggest gainer in the coming decades because the convenience factor looms large in most people hearts. Also a lot of people I've meet of all ages seem to like this thing called "culture." Ex. theater, social clubs, Museums, etc. etc. Personally I don't get it but the people seem to like it. Also there is likely to be good access to public transportation trains and buses and also person could have the possibility walk anywhere they need to go for daily items.

Small towns (so of there will be former suburbs) I think would still be very much alive in the coming decades. Of course that will be contingent on if/when the mom and pop retro revolutions begins. Basically People will live in these small town and create a microcosm economy for goods and services. Day to day items will be bought at the town stores owned and operated by people that live in the community. Now for those who wish to make lots of money and have culture this would not the gig for you. But for a person like me that just wants good landscape and a slower pace of life it would work.

Farms believe it or not would and actually will probably thrive in the next couple of decades because of the demand for food goods around the world. I expect grain/corn exports to be huge in the next couple of decades or so. Especially from China and India. I know that there are some huge multi corps owning a lot of farming but I don't think this trend will continue. I think want-a-be farmers will increase in numbers looking for some profit and a simpler lifestyle. Eventually there will be a increase in overall independent farmers and the Multi corps will have to share over all production with them.


2. We actually do get our act together and get vehicles that are extremely fuel efficient or run on some energy source that is not expense to manufacture Then thing will be status quo.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Sitting on a bar stool. Guinness in hand.
4,429 posts, read 5,804,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
unless your farm is near a major urban area you sir are going to be in trouble. The days of trucking food in from thousands of miles will soon be at a close
Acutually wild trains can easilly take any farming/cattle product to markets across the usa. The farmer and reciever will just need enough fuel to get to the train stop to drop off/pick up the goods.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:14 PM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,759,702 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by pghquest View Post
And your proposing that they will put farms in the middle of downtown NYC? Dont think so. When they continue to truck food in from other countries, I hardly expect trucking it in from the farms in the middle of nowhere is at risk..
^^


NYC community Gardens

hydro farming in NYC

Urban Farm: Chicago

Community Gardens: LA area

do research

Quote:
Originally Posted by baystater View Post
Acutually wild trains can easilly take any farming/cattle product to markets across the usa. The farmer and reciever will just need enough fuel to get to the train stop to drop off/pick up the goods.
I can't find the article right now however here is the jest. America's rail = dilapidated. to fix = billions of dollars and will take years. As it is now, trains can be delayed for days on end because of lack of double tracking etc.

To think our current system can save the day for our shipping food from long distances need, is to ignore facts on the ground.

*edit*

found the link (broken link)

Last edited by Wild Style; 06-27-2008 at 07:30 PM..
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,257,221 times
Reputation: 4927
I realize that city living is easier than farming, and less risky- but it is unrewarding to me. What I like are two things, farming and manufacturing. Ideally I would have an algae farm or small factory, in a rural area. In the past cities were necessary as centers of manufacturing and trade. However, today we have a nationwide network of roads and the Internet that did not exist in 1900. I really feel that cities are obsolete to an extent unless they have resources and create products. Once the speculators and financiers sell out this country and the economy crashes, the farms and sources of raw materials will be where it is at. What economic activity will support all those city dwellers who pay 1/2 million to live in a pidgeon hole? The only way that cities will survive is to revive manufacturing.
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Old 06-27-2008, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,257,221 times
Reputation: 4927
Once zoning is repealed in suburban areas, you will see more neighborhood food production. I like the idea of city farming as well, it is better for the environment and allows city waste to be converted to produce. A friend of mine who now lives in Minnesota has experimented with aeroponic basement vegetable gardening during the winter and had incredible results. But remember, produce is production. Only sustainable production can save us.
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Old 06-27-2008, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Sitting on a bar stool. Guinness in hand.
4,429 posts, read 5,804,131 times
Reputation: 1708
[quote=Wild Style;425772



I can't find the article right now however here is the jest. America's rail = dilapidated. to fix = billions of dollars and will take years. As it is now, trains can be delayed for days on end because of lack of double tracking etc.

To think our current system can save the day for our shipping food from long distances need, is to ignore facts on the ground.

*edit*

found the link (broken link)[/QUOTE]


Touché. Very good. And thank you for the article.
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