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Old 07-03-2008, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Ohio
21,300 posts, read 15,086,092 times
Reputation: 17731

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
lets follow what this means

star bucks cuts jobs (as will other food service industry business will soon). That means more layoffs right?
Yes, that's how Cost Inflation works its magic, starting with the service sector: slow and deliberate, just like a dream where a freight train is headed right at you in slow motion and there's nothing you can do to stop it.

A depreciating US Dollar drives prices up, and shortages in commodities drives the prices even higher, reducing people's disposable incomes. People have to make choices. Higher fuel prices create additional problems by eating up disposable income faster, plus people start using mass transit and drive less by combining trips or going out only when necessary.

Since labor at retail and restaurant is solely dependent on sales volume, which is dependent on people being out and about, those people who work in retail and restaurant get their hours reduced, and take home less money, which then starts affecting the retail and restaurant sectors more dramatically and eventually spills over into other sectors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
But what does it mean for people on white collar fields?
That depends on the sector of the economy they work in and their management level. Lower level white collar workers go first, then usually the process audits start, so be wary of any "temporary" workers who suddenly appear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
What it also means is, look for people to start doing more crime and I would assume really outlandish sorts of crime at that.
There's no link between poverty and crime nor is there a link between high unemployment and crime.
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Old 07-03-2008, 11:53 AM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,765,640 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niners fan View Post
I was agreeing with you up until I got to the part about the crime wave...
nothing to agree or disagree with. Crime is up in almost every metro area, thats a fact my man. As things get worse, so will the crime numbers.
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Old 07-03-2008, 11:55 AM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,765,640 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Yes, that's how Cost Inflation works its magic, starting with the service sector: slow and deliberate, just like a dream where a freight train is headed right at you in slow motion and there's nothing you can do to stop it.

A depreciating US Dollar drives prices up, and shortages in commodities drives the prices even higher, reducing people's disposable incomes. People have to make choices. Higher fuel prices create additional problems by eating up disposable income faster, plus people start using mass transit and drive less by combining trips or going out only when necessary.

Since labor at retail and restaurant is solely dependent on sales volume, which is dependent on people being out and about, those people who work in retail and restaurant get their hours reduced, and take home less money, which then starts affecting the retail and restaurant sectors more dramatically and eventually spills over into other sectors.



That depends on the sector of the economy they work in and their management level. Lower level white collar workers go first, then usually the process audits start, so be wary of any "temporary" workers who suddenly appear.



There's no link between poverty and crime nor is there a link between high unemployment and crime.
there is no link between poverty and crime? *chuckle* ok.
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Old 07-04-2008, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Ohio
21,300 posts, read 15,086,092 times
Reputation: 17731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
there is no link between poverty and crime? *chuckle* ok.
When you get your degree in law enforcement, and I do mean law enforcement and not criminal justice, and you reach the rank of detective sergeant, then you'll have sufficient knowledge and information to render an opinion, instead of stating a false belief.

In the mean time, any time you're ready I'll take you on the World Poverty Tour. I'll show you poverty that will make you puke and have nightmares for the rest of your life, and that'll just be from the first part of the tour in Eastern Europe. After that, we'll go to the traditional poverty haunts in Asia, Africa and South America, assuming you can hack it.

Those people don't have electricity or running water, but don't worry, they aren't going to kill you for your Adidas shoes, or your i-Pod, or your cell-phone.
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Old 07-04-2008, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
1,356 posts, read 5,592,530 times
Reputation: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
there is no link between poverty and crime? *chuckle* ok.
I don't know wild style. Five of the bottom seven counties in terms of per capita income in the US are in South Dakota:
Lowest-income counties in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It appears that South Dakota alone dispels the poverty = crime myth.
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site

Last edited by Yac; 09-13-2018 at 04:57 AM..
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Old 07-04-2008, 04:47 PM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,765,640 times
Reputation: 2073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
When you get your degree in law enforcement, and I do mean law enforcement and not criminal justice, and you reach the rank of detective sergeant, then you'll have sufficient knowledge and information to render an opinion, instead of stating a false belief.

In the mean time, any time you're ready I'll take you on the World Poverty Tour. I'll show you poverty that will make you puke and have nightmares for the rest of your life, and that'll just be from the first part of the tour in Eastern Europe. After that, we'll go to the traditional poverty haunts in Asia, Africa and South America, assuming you can hack it.

Those people don't have electricity or running water, but don't worry, they aren't going to kill you for your Adidas shoes, or your i-Pod, or your cell-phone.
lol,

a degree in law enforcement doesn't have anything to do with sufficiently compiling information on what SOCIAL issues do or don't contribute to crime my friend. LOL where do these people come from. Sociologist generally study such issues. Law enforcement can however give you states on what areas (geographic) have higher crime, or what felonies have been committed, so on and so on.

As for this "world tour" my family is from west africa my friend. If you knew ANYTHING about the world you would see the directo correlation between crime and social circumstances. Go crack open a book written by a notable sociologist and then come back and talk to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Niners fan View Post
I don't know wild style. Five of the bottom seven counties in terms of per capita income in the US are in South Dakota:
Lowest-income counties in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It appears that South Dakota alone dispels the poverty = crime myth.
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site
Are you serious? Please tell me no.

Last edited by Yac; 09-13-2018 at 04:57 AM..
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Old 07-04-2008, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,899,112 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
Sad, one of the hallmarks of this decade can't even withstand the current economy. I know I haven't been to Starbucks since gas hit $4/gallon. Neverthless, Starbucks went into many markets that were NOT Starbucks markets. It repeated the mistake of Krispy Kreme. A brand like that loses its specialty when its in every hick town and every gas station in the US.
They overbuilt in the first place. Some places here in Atlanta they are literally across the street from each other! And they built in some places where they should not have. They are primarily a yuppie company and out here where I live we drink Waffle House coffee- black!
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Old 07-04-2008, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,899,112 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by norcalmom101 View Post
You know, I'm a Peet's snob, and McD's coffee is actually pretty good. Good business move!
My coffee is Waffle House and my chocolate is Tim Hortons that I order from Canada.
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Old 07-04-2008, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Jonquil City (aka Smyrna) Georgia- by Atlanta
16,248 posts, read 21,899,112 times
Reputation: 3587
Quote:
Originally Posted by Niners fan View Post
I don't know wild style. Five of the bottom seven counties in terms of per capita income in the US are in South Dakota:
Lowest-income counties in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It appears that South Dakota alone dispels the poverty = crime myth.
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site
Those probably have indian reservations on them. And I do not know if the FBI counts crimes that occur on indian reservations towards the crime rate since they have no jurisdiction over them.

Last edited by Yac; 09-13-2018 at 04:57 AM..
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Old 07-04-2008, 05:30 PM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,633,565 times
Reputation: 4586
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelmate38 View Post
The thing most here have overlooked is that for unskilled work, Starbucks was huge. It provided livable wages to tens of thousands of lower middle class Americans. A starting wage at most starbucks was about $12 an hour. Not bad for making a cup of frothy coffee. Plus they offered a very lucrative benefit package that offered a family health care plan, 401K and even retirement. The average person who worked at Starbucks for 5 years made a salary of over $30,000 yearly, plus medical, dental vision. etc.

I never used Starbucks, I have a $2000 Italian espresso machine and have made my own lattes for years at about 25 cents each. BUT my point is, all those jobs are lost and what are those people going to do? Just add more and more pressure to blue collar workers and jobs, thus lowering the wages and benefits for us all even further. The reverse trickle down affect is well under way folks. Watch, listen, learn, history is repeating itself right before you eyes! What history you ask? The great depression. Fasten in tight, it's going to be a wile ride..........
That first cup cost you $2000.25...
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