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Old 11-15-2008, 10:29 PM
 
1,989 posts, read 4,466,032 times
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....some never before seen public service tv ads? Like a US government funded ad encouraging people to read books (ironically created out of movie footage) or ads about the virtue of saving money or keeping better track of your health expenses?

I've seen all three for the first time this week.

So the message is...Start reading books for entertainment, save your money and try to keep your healthcare costs under control.

The underlying message is....

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Old 11-16-2008, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
3,306 posts, read 4,155,506 times
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I haven't seen those. But I don't watch much TV. I have seen ads for the FDIC and SIPC online though, which I thought was a little odd.
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Old 11-16-2008, 11:23 AM
 
7,099 posts, read 27,184,501 times
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Think about it this way......those TV ads are paid for by tax money.

Doesn't it make you feel just wonderful that your tax dollars are being spent this way?

The underlying reason for these ads is that they have to come up with new ways for people to justify their jobs. "Ah Ha!!" says One, "Let's encourage people to read more and save money." When they get 25 other warn bodies to agree with them, it's done. And they can then justify their position as advisors.

And we'll be glad to foot the bill, won't we!!!
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Old 11-16-2008, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,171 posts, read 7,662,720 times
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Public Service Ads usually run when paid ads pull out or they don't sell enough advertising for the slots available.
Could be an indication that advertisers are slashing budgets and pulling out of shows too late to sell anyhing else.
More PSAs=Fewer ad dollars=less confidence in consumer buying
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Old 11-16-2008, 02:48 PM
 
5,760 posts, read 11,546,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knoxgarden View Post
Public Service Ads usually run when paid ads pull out or they don't sell enough advertising for the slots available.
Could be an indication that advertisers are slashing budgets and pulling out of shows too late to sell anyhing else.
More PSAs=Fewer ad dollars=less confidence in consumer buying
A + You get it.

Only means revenue paying ads are down.

Once again, there is no hidden messages, no conspiracy, no massive government funds at waste . . . and still no Space Aliens.

Geeezzz, and folks consider ME a doomer - conspiracy type.
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Old 11-16-2008, 06:13 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 27,184,501 times
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Oh, yesss indeedy, they are run when there are cheap slots available, but there was a cost involved in development of the ad involved. The folks that made the pretty public service anouncement, didn't do it for free.

No matter, they are still better than watching the same old, same old ads about creepy health and physical problems. I get ill just listening to the list of possible side effects to some of these medications.
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Old 11-16-2008, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,471 posts, read 15,833,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knoxgarden View Post
Public Service Ads usually run when paid ads pull out or they don't sell enough advertising for the slots available.
Could be an indication that advertisers are slashing budgets and pulling out of shows too late to sell anyhing else.
More PSAs=Fewer ad dollars=less confidence in consumer buying
Cadillac, a GM brand, withdrew its sponsorship of the Masters golf tournament in January, and this summer, GM ended its relationships with two NASCAR racetracks: Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee and New Hampshire Motor Speedway. The company is not renewing its long-standing partnership with the U.S. Olympic Committee when the contract expires at the end of this year. In one of the most dramatic examples of the company's diminishing sports profile, GM said recently that it would not buy television commercials in the Super Bowl broadcast this season.

Amid downturn in U.S., GM and other sports sponsors rethink their game plans - International Herald Tribune
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Old 11-16-2008, 07:31 PM
 
1,989 posts, read 4,466,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Padgett2 View Post
Oh, yesss indeedy, they are run when there are cheap slots available, but there was a cost involved in development of the ad involved. The folks that made the pretty public service anouncement, didn't do it for free.

No matter, they are still better than watching the same old, same old ads about creepy health and physical problems. I get ill just listening to the list of possible side effects to some of these medications.
Not only are there big costs to produce the ads, there are also big committees that choose which ads-- out of dozens to hundreds-- the government will run. So there is something going on here.

Did the government choose its "don't do drugs" or "create an emergency readiness kit" or "stay in school" ads that we're all so familiar with? No. For decades, they're running the same stuff and then all the sudden, we're getting "save your money," "the FDIC is great," and "don't spend your money."

"Just because I'm paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get me."
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Old 11-16-2008, 07:45 PM
 
465 posts, read 1,417,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cohdane View Post
....some never before seen public service tv ads? Like a US government funded ad encouraging people to read books (ironically created out of movie footage) or ads about the virtue of saving money or keeping better track of your health expenses?

I've seen all three for the first time this week.

So the message is...Start reading books for entertainment, save your money and try to keep your healthcare costs under control.

The underlying message is....

I haven't seen them but it sounds OK to me. Exactly what year was it that we decided to stop teaching our children about the value of money?
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Old 11-16-2008, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,171 posts, read 7,662,720 times
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You can get the info on Federal PSA's from the GAO report done on them in 2006
Public service announcement ... - Google Book Search
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