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Old 11-16-2008, 11:23 AM
 
5,340 posts, read 8,888,539 times
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Food banks see more need, fewer donations | U.S. | Reuters


Food banks are reporting increased demands and less donations. According to the article, many of the new needy are middle class folks. I am posting this, in part, because there are always some people who wrongly believe that people who need help are lazy, undeserving leeches. I hope those who need help get the help they need in this cold, harsh winter.

Last edited by davidt1; 11-16-2008 at 12:51 PM..
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Old 11-16-2008, 09:27 PM
 
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and to think we waste money subsidizing farmers to NOT produce food.
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Old 11-17-2008, 01:30 AM
 
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hmmm, sincere confusion here . . . it would seem that the Food Banks would need Food -- not money, per se. Food is what they deal in, correct?

What am I missing?

btw, I like what I know of the various Food Bank and Pantry systems -- but throwing money at non-money problems does not always make much sense.
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Old 11-17-2008, 04:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by killer2021 View Post
and to think we waste money subsidizing farmers to NOT produce food.
i always thought that was nuts! government standing in the way of production again!
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Old 11-17-2008, 06:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by killer2021 View Post
and to think we waste money subsidizing farmers to NOT produce food.
Is this done to manipulate the commodities market or for some other reason?
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Old 11-17-2008, 11:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by trishguard View Post
Is this done to manipulate the commodities market or for some other reason?
Essentially, that's the concept ... to allow the soil bank to "rest" fallow or with a cover crop in CRP instead of producing an excess of a given crop which lowers the market price below a profitable production point.

But, it's not the "small farm" that's taking in the big share of these monies, even with a small acreage in CRP. Typical payments are on the order of a few dollars per acre; it's not like a small farm is able to survive on non-production. The land is also returned to wildlife habitat as part of being taken out of production; a farmer cannot even graze his own livestock on CRP land, all he can do is look at the dirt he owns (and pays taxes and insurance on). It's the big national corporate farms that have figured out how to "game" this aspect of our Farm Bill and turn it into a profitable money maker for them.

I'd be very happy if the Fed's would get out of attempting to control/influence our food production and allow the free market to establish the value of the commodities. Fed manipulation has worked to the detriment of farmers across the country ... up until very recently, we saw beef prices below cost of production, or wheat in the $2.50 per bushel range. Locally, our land costs, seed costs, insurance, equipment costs, and fuel costs, it was less of a loss to leave some of our dryland wheat (that's hard red winter wheat, the best for bread flour) land fallow than to even plant it, let alone harvest 30-40 bushel/acre HRWW. So, do we plant this year in confidence and optimism that we can get a return on all of our work and investment ... prepping a field, planting it ... doesn't come for free. Most of our costs are up-front before we have a crop or a market to sell it to.
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