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View Poll Results: Do you know a Depresssion survivor personally?
I know a Depression survivor 141 90.97%
I do not know a Depression survivor 14 9.03%
Voters: 155. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-18-2008, 08:46 AM
 
5,090 posts, read 10,048,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
My earliest photos show me in a cloth diaper tied to a row of berries, as my siblings picked berries. I was the row marker.
THAT is quite a mental image, FBK.

Thank you for that very personal perspective.

Quote:
Building that farm up now, to be ready.
So we shall, together, my brother.
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Old 12-18-2008, 09:29 AM
 
242 posts, read 674,266 times
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i'll let you know in ten years...

oh, the first great depression....sorry, my bad.

my grandma. SHe died in the 80s. My dad was born in 37
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Old 12-18-2008, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Florida
21,000 posts, read 21,124,615 times
Reputation: 25278
I was raised by parents that went through it and it definately influenced how I handle money and possessions.I don't save bread wrappers and every twister tie like my mom did way past the time it made sense .She didn't get to use 1/1000 of the saved ones
But I don't replace anything until it's no longer working/useful.

What chet may not understand is that some 'doom and gloom' thinking/talking is only "planning for the worst and hoping for the best"
Or applying the boy scout motto of being prepared.
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Old 12-18-2008, 10:13 AM
 
28,453 posts, read 73,536,850 times
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I have no problem with people being prudent about building up their savings, planning for tougher times, and even thinking out load about a "worst case sceanrio".

I have a whole different attitude toward folks that seem to want to ENCOURAGE panic behavior, possibly for personal gain, and are flat out irrational when it comes to LIKELY effects of widespread awareness of the financial difficulties.

My grandfather on my dad's side (long since deceased) moved the family from Chicago to the Dubuque, where he used his Old Country skills to make a decent living farming while the family business was 'suspended' in Chicago. They eventually moved back, with a "better business plan" while the Depression was still raging, but an awareness that in America all kinds of opportunity was possible. My dad was the youngest and served in WWII. He went to college and joined the family business. He was pretty frugal in his personal life, much preferred to use cash for things, but had a thorough understanding of the business uses of credit and a healthy respect for the downsides of government intervention.

There is a world of difference between hoping for the best and cheerleading alongside a train wreck...
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Old 12-18-2008, 11:20 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,299 posts, read 12,553,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
I have no problem with people being prudent about building up their savings, planning for tougher times, and even thinking out load about a "worst case sceanrio".

I have a whole different attitude toward folks that seem to want to ENCOURAGE panic behavior, possibly for personal gain, and are flat out irrational when it comes to LIKELY effects of widespread awareness of the financial difficulties.
...
I think we have different views on what is likely, and thus different ideas about how urgent it is to prepare and how much preparation is needed.

You and the Globe reporter seem to believe that most economists are predicting a recession rather than a depression. My own observation is that only government-employed economists are publicly predicting a recession, and of course they have a vested interest in preventing panic.

Non-governmental economists that I've read haven't used the word "depression" a lot, sometimes they do, but their analyses imply a depression without actually calling it that.

Quote:
The Great Depression lasted a decade by some measures, and at its worst, one in four American workers was out of a job. (By comparison, unemployment now is at a 14-year high of 6.5 percent.)
As has been pointed out many times in this forum the unemployment rate is over 16% when calculated by the older methods used before Clinton, and we've got at least a couple million more layoffs on the way.

Also remember that your thinking (at least below the surface) is that most people are like you - a professional with many resources, lots of savings and wise investments. It's natural to assume that most people are like us.

But they're not. Most people are on the brink of unemployment, and they have few savings and investments. Their need for preparation is much more urgent than yours, given the reduced ability of the govt to provide safety nets.
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Old 12-18-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
17,031 posts, read 27,574,967 times
Reputation: 16212
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waterlily View Post
I grew up around depression era adults. Both of my parents,grandparents, and aunts all lived through the depression. My husbands' family is the same way only they had a larger family during the depression era.
Many had to struggle, and some just coasted along. My farther in law grew up on a dairy farm, so they did alright. They grew some vegetables but cut back on growing them because of theft problems. I guess people weren't too interested in stealing the cows.
Yes I believe I learned something from all those people. I learned to make do with what you have. Don't be too greedy. Don't get in debt beyond what you can easily pay. Most of all don't worry about keeping up with the neighbors and the Joneses.
Exactly. Like many posters my parents were born in the depression era and passed a lot about saving and not getting to far into debt. I've been surprised by all the expensive cars and furnishings I see by people in their 20s. Hope its paid in full...
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Old 12-18-2008, 11:28 AM
 
3,490 posts, read 7,524,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post
They were extreme savers. Grandma recycled ziploc bags. They saved everything and never spent anything, even decades after the depression. It's kind of sad, really. When they died, in the same tiny cold creaky house they'd lived in for decades, they left behind the better part of a million dollars in various investments. They never spent money so they never knew much about money. They just knew to always save it and never spend it. They didn't know how to spend money. They could have lived nicely, used heat in the winter, bought a car that works, traveled the country or the world, gone out and done things, etc. But instead, even during good times, they were conservative to a fault.
.
Yes, there has to be some kind of spend/ save balance. What's the point of saving a million dollars if you never get to enjoy any of it?
That is one extreme, and the spend thrift, credit card dependance we are seeing now is the other. We need to strike a happy medium!


Interesting piece.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
From the Boston Globe link above

Keep sucking down the FEAR UNCERTAINITY & DOUBT that the MEDIA WIZARDS are pumping out and soon you sheep will be BEGGING to have our health care federalized, our retirements accounts seized by the idiot do-gooders, and our free choice snuffed out.


Wha???
Are you saying that countries with 'federalized' health care (like pretty much every first world country except the USA) , are in fact communist?
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Old 12-18-2008, 12:31 PM
 
28,453 posts, read 73,536,850 times
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Loss of choices in our investments, retirement option, health care and a myriad of other financial decision would be the natural consequences of people continuing to believe that the sky is falling and we are all doomed...

The pathetically weak socialist economies of Europe do have "government provided health care" but the warped thinking of communism is really only alive in Cuba and North Korea, so you can rest assured that I won't mistake those for where we are heading.

I think it is long way to drift from warnings about comparisonsof the current business climate to the Great Depression through harping up Fear Uncertainity and Doubt will serve as a wedge that would lead to nearly inevitable loss of personal choices into a debate singing the praises of government controlled health care. If you want to have THAT debate we should take it to another thread -- probably outside business, finance & investing....
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Old 12-18-2008, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 5,341,569 times
Reputation: 1295
My grandparents lived through the depression. After loosing everything they went back to Europe to live on the family farm. They may of not had money in their pockets but at least they did not go hungry. They never believed in the banks after loosing all of their cash and never purchased anything using credit. They just never trusted the economy 100% in the years following the great depression.
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Old 12-18-2008, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,255,593 times
Reputation: 16829
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Both sets of my grandparents were farmers, and lost their farms during the dust bowl era. Became migrant farm workers along with my parents. My earliest photos show me in a cloth diaper tied to a row of berries, as my siblings picked berries. I was the row marker.

I got a 20-year government pension, and then bought a farm.

Building that farm up now, to be ready.
Wow, what an amazing picture to have. When your kids/grandkids compain about not being able to buy something talk to them about that.

My grandmother might have helped out yours. She had two kids to raise on not much but did have a home, and did what she could for those who did not.

I can't do a farm, but used to live in socal. Between the rising crime and gangs and the out of control cost of living I had to move, but came to a small town with farms and ranches around it for a reason. Having been there I appreciate the value of a roof over your head and a good stock of food.

Google the word "homestead" and read about the expanding movement for self-sufficency, even to those who can only do their part. And the growing list of intentional communities, established as a planned way to be self sufficent in a community setting. Perhaps these are the fringe, but the way the fringe is expanding shows there are a lot more people on the fence.

As another poster says, preparation does not mean the worse must happen but if it does your not taken by surprise.
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