U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Do you know a Depresssion survivor personally?
I know a Depression survivor 141 90.97%
I do not know a Depression survivor 14 9.03%
Voters: 155. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-24-2011, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
3,685 posts, read 6,203,798 times
Reputation: 3632

Advertisements

I've been thinking about starting a blog focusing on stories of the Depression and WWII. I thought I'd have people share stories of survival, being frugal, gardens and such. This thread makes me think I should do it...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-24-2011, 03:52 PM
 
9,955 posts, read 16,564,733 times
Reputation: 16880
Quote:
Originally Posted by little elmer View Post
My parents as well. The habit of keeping bread crumbs in the pantry for a rainy day was a hard one to break, I hear.

How did they keep them from getting moldy?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2011, 04:01 PM
 
9,955 posts, read 16,564,733 times
Reputation: 16880
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYChistorygal View Post
I've been thinking about starting a blog focusing on stories of the Depression and WWII. I thought I'd have people share stories of survival, being frugal, gardens and such. This thread makes me think I should do it...

I can share stories of my grandparents......Grandpa never went into debt. he built his own house while living down the street in a rental. He paid for the materials as he went.

Then, along came the GD, he got laid off from his good-paying job in the factory. he got a job that same afternoon, driving a trolley bus, kept it for 4 years. It was a fraction of the pay, but they managed, because he owned his house. also, he took advantage of bankruptcy sales, bought up machines, and started his own business. By WWII, he was a wealthy man, relatively speaking. then, Grandma became sick, cancer. there was no such thing as medical insurance, pay or die.

Grandpa went almost broke providing for Grandma's medical bills, then he spent the remaining years of his life inpovrished. BTW, my Grandmother died MAY, 1965. What's signficant about that date, or about that time? anyone know?

It was June, 1965, LBJ signed the medicare act. For the first time, seniors had medical insurance. Prior to that, either pay or die. Well, medicare was signed into law one month after my grandmother died, and none of it was rectroactive. When we complain about how complicated insurance is now (and it is) just realize people didn't always have the option to utilize (and complain) about insurance. At least we now have something, flawed as the system is, its better than nothing!

One thing I learned from my grandparents and parents, they accepted their responsibilities without complaining. They never gripped the govt didn't hand them more money, we took care of our own then. Guess its too much to ask now?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2011, 04:16 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,299 posts, read 12,541,461 times
Reputation: 8057
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
How did they keep them from getting moldy?
Dried white bread stays good for at least a year, and can be restored by adding a bit of water and heat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-26-2011, 09:45 PM
 
5,546 posts, read 8,864,645 times
Reputation: 2780
Yes, my mother and my now deceased father.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2011, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Anchorage
801 posts, read 1,534,454 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYChistorygal View Post
I've been thinking about starting a blog focusing on stories of the Depression and WWII. I thought I'd have people share stories of survival, being frugal, gardens and such. This thread makes me think I should do it...
i will look forward to it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2011, 07:39 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
21,431 posts, read 20,429,229 times
Reputation: 37556
There's a lot of information on frugal living in old books from the Depression era. I've always loved those books, even the cookbooks with their frugal meals and uses of leftovers and lists of ways to re-use and make do--I have one old book that has ways to use leftover soap slivers, leftover everything.

My late parents lived through the Depression and it was my mother's stories, especially that turned me into a lifelong frugal person.

My mother's Dad died in October 1929--same time that the stock market crashed and that left the mother with the three youngest kids and nothing except the house they owned. All his money had been in the stock market.

He'd had a good job and my mother had some memories of having pretty dolls and other nice things but at the age of seven her mother had to take boarders into their house. My mother grew up doing housework and helping cook and clean for the boarders.
Her mother was a great cook so there were always plenty of boarders and she got extra money when the town fair was on because she would set up tables in the yard and feed the fair workers. They all wanted to be assigned to her for meals--and from what I've heard her pies were legendary!

My mother remembers having only 2 dresses, one to wear while she washed the other one. She was embarrassed to go to school in the same two dresses day after day.

My mother took the hard courses in school so that she could go to college but when the time came, there was no money for it. Her grandmother had a job and put her through two years of secretarial school.

My mother never got over it. She never ever bought new clothes but would only wear what other people would give her secondhand. If we bought clothing for her at Christmas she would return it.

She never wasted money on makeup and fancy haircuts. She always shopped at several grocery stores to use all her coupons and get the best bargains. We took vacations in the off-season to save money.

To this day I'll admit that I still save aluminum foil and twist 'ems--I sort of thought everyone did. Today I went to MacDonalds and washed and saved the plastic straw so I don't have to ever buy straws. We make iced coffee at home and re-use the MacDonalds cups and straws when we go on car trips. I re-use plastic bags and cardboard boxes. I plant vegetables. I've never had a car loan and I drive a 1998 car and keep it in good repair. I have a hard time spending money but not as bad as my mother who just couldn't buy anything except necessary things for us kids (even though she had the money.)

I use credit cards and I think they're great but I pay them off and only use them for emergencies like medical expenses or car repairs.

I can still picture my mother's mother, in her old age, standing there doing ironing for other people to earn money. Because her husband died young and died at the same time the Depression started. There was no social security for her.

And, yes, as other people have said, my mother remembered Christmas presents consisting of fruit. There were also homemade presents for each other. These people today who live in the MacMansions and throw money around and take the kids to Disney World three times a year are NUTS! I hope a lot of them learn a lesson and change their values and get a more down to earth view of how to live and not think they need to have everything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2011, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
2,727 posts, read 5,504,476 times
Reputation: 1980
Of course my elderly relatives (grandparents, great aunts/uncles) are all survivors. They are gone now, but I do wish I had an opportunity to talk to them about it.

My mother's side of the family came to America in the late 40's so they were not here at the time. However, they were very poor and suffered their own "problems" (can't think of the word to use) where they came from. My grandmother and great aunt were very frugal and had that same mentality of paying for everything in cash.

Again, they passed away when I was in my teens, but I do wish I had had an opportunity to talk with them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2011, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Ohio
21,281 posts, read 15,078,410 times
Reputation: 17713
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
It was June, 1965, LBJ signed the medicare act. For the first time, seniors had medical insurance. Prior to that, either pay or die.
How sad to be so misinformed.

They did have medical insurance. It was called "catastrophic medical insurance" and it was sponsored by one's employer ever since FDR enacted a Wage & Price Freeze because rising wages were driving prices up (um, that is what Wage Inflation does).

Catastrophic "health insurance" was for long term health care coverage in the event you were seriously injured in an accident, like an automobile accident, or if you got "the cancer" and you required 6 to 36 months of hospitalization. It was expanded in the 1950s to cover emergency room visits, and then expanded again in the early 1960s to cover child-birth.

Since Oncology did not exist at the time, and since there weren't any Oncologists, and since they were clueless, and since the only cancers were lung cancer, "women's cancer" and "the" cancer, there wasn't much they could do anyway, even if they spent $104 TRILLION TRILLION on your grandmother.

I would say your grandfather fed you a line of bull, probably because he was angry that he lost his wife, or that he and everyone else on Planet Earth was powerless to help her at the time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2011, 09:01 AM
 
48,509 posts, read 86,145,879 times
Reputation: 18105
I can still rememeber when the often had to do exploratory surgery on people. As a kid I can still rememeber when the adults would say they found cancer ;so had to sew them up because nothing they could do. Even back then mnay people had hospitalization insuarnce which meant it only paid when you were hospitalized. That was common for both those working and retired.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top