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View Poll Results: Do you know a Depresssion survivor personally?
I know a Depression survivor 141 90.97%
I do not know a Depression survivor 14 9.03%
Voters: 155. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-01-2011, 10:43 AM
 
1,566 posts, read 2,842,936 times
Reputation: 1262

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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
There's a lot of information on frugal living in old books from the Depression era. I've always loved those books, even the cookbooks with their frugal meals and uses of leftovers and lists of ways to re-use and make do--I have one old book that has ways to use leftover soap slivers, leftover everything.

My late parents lived through the Depression and it was my mother's stories, especially that turned me into a lifelong frugal person.

My mother's Dad died in October 1929--same time that the stock market crashed and that left the mother with the three youngest kids and nothing except the house they owned. All his money had been in the stock market.

He'd had a good job and my mother had some memories of having pretty dolls and other nice things but at the age of seven her mother had to take boarders into their house. My mother grew up doing housework and helping cook and clean for the boarders.
Her mother was a great cook so there were always plenty of boarders and she got extra money when the town fair was on because she would set up tables in the yard and feed the fair workers. They all wanted to be assigned to her for meals--and from what I've heard her pies were legendary!

My mother remembers having only 2 dresses, one to wear while she washed the other one. She was embarrassed to go to school in the same two dresses day after day.

My mother took the hard courses in school so that she could go to college but when the time came, there was no money for it. Her grandmother had a job and put her through two years of secretarial school.

My mother never got over it. She never ever bought new clothes but would only wear what other people would give her secondhand. If we bought clothing for her at Christmas she would return it.

She never wasted money on makeup and fancy haircuts. She always shopped at several grocery stores to use all her coupons and get the best bargains. We took vacations in the off-season to save money.

To this day I'll admit that I still save aluminum foil and twist 'ems--I sort of thought everyone did. Today I went to MacDonalds and washed and saved the plastic straw so I don't have to ever buy straws. We make iced coffee at home and re-use the MacDonalds cups and straws when we go on car trips. I re-use plastic bags and cardboard boxes. I plant vegetables. I've never had a car loan and I drive a 1998 car and keep it in good repair. I have a hard time spending money but not as bad as my mother who just couldn't buy anything except necessary things for us kids (even though she had the money.)

I use credit cards and I think they're great but I pay them off and only use them for emergencies like medical expenses or car repairs.

I can still picture my mother's mother, in her old age, standing there doing ironing for other people to earn money. Because her husband died young and died at the same time the Depression started. There was no social security for her.

And, yes, as other people have said, my mother remembered Christmas presents consisting of fruit. There were also homemade presents for each other. These people today who live in the MacMansions and throw money around and take the kids to Disney World three times a year are NUTS! I hope a lot of them learn a lesson and change their values and get a more down to earth view of how to live and not think they need to have everything.
people who **** all their money away are nuts- but so are people who wash straws and paper cubs to save 4 dollars a year
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Old 08-03-2011, 04:51 PM
 
9,966 posts, read 16,577,996 times
Reputation: 16902
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
How sad to be so misinformed.

They did have medical insurance. It was called "catastrophic medical insurance" and it was sponsored by one's employer ever since FDR enacted a Wage & Price Freeze because rising wages were driving prices up (um, that is what Wage Inflation does).

Catastrophic "health insurance" was for long term health care coverage in the event you were seriously injured in an accident, like an automobile accident, or if you got "the cancer" and you required 6 to 36 months of hospitalization. It was expanded in the 1950s to cover emergency room visits, and then expanded again in the early 1960s to cover child-birth.

Since Oncology did not exist at the time, and since there weren't any Oncologists, and since they were clueless, and since the only cancers were lung cancer, "women's cancer" and "the" cancer, there wasn't much they could do anyway, even if they spent $104 TRILLION TRILLION on your grandmother.

I would say your grandfather fed you a line of bull, probably because he was angry that he lost his wife, or that he and everyone else on Planet Earth was powerless to help her at the time.
My grandfather was self-employed, so he didn't qualify for any govt sponsored plan. BTW, my grandmother had leukemia, a type of blood cancer. Sorry my grandparents story irritates you so much..........sorry Grandpa spent his last dime on her care and you think its bull****
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:08 AM
 
Location: In America's Heartland
929 posts, read 1,916,494 times
Reputation: 1177
Yes. My parents and both sets of grandparents lived, worked and survived the Great Depression. One of my grandfathers never made more than $100 a week and worked a long 6 day week for that. He never owned a car and built his own house... saw it destroyed in a flood and rebuilt it again. They survived on persistence instead of assistance.
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Old 08-07-2011, 04:24 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,299 posts, read 12,547,783 times
Reputation: 8057
I think you've missed the point of why people nowadays get assistance, debtmonger. Unless the recipient is scamming the system, most who get it are disabled (or are single mothers who can't work for low wages and no benefits, and raise kids safely at the same time).

"Persistance" won't help you rebuild a home if you're blind, a paraplegic, severely retarded, have muscular dystrophy, are dying of cancer, or are slowly dying of emphysema.
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Old 09-11-2011, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Sausalito, CA
129 posts, read 383,565 times
Reputation: 91
I was raised by my Grandmother, who went through the Great Depression.

She ended up being a hoarder of things & of money.
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Old 09-12-2011, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,252,215 times
Reputation: 8847
My great-aunt grew up in the Depression. her husband was a freemason and saved...she lived in the same house 60 years after he died, no kids.She lived alone many years and was self-sufficient-money wasnt her main thing, but she lived penuriously.

Once she paid her plumber by giving him the antique Packard she had in her garage. She never trusted banks and hid money in the house....she had a great social life, lived to be 90 and died a multi-millionaire-they truly were the greatest generation, survived through a great deal.
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Old 09-12-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: NC
10,002 posts, read 9,272,709 times
Reputation: 3074
My grandfather lived through the great depression he was young, but told me about his parents. My great grandparents owned a grocery store and they lived above it with their 3 kids and around 10 boarders, mainly from Italy. They basically got their food from their garden, their boarders and the stuff they couldn't sell in the store. My great grandmother was apparently a great cook who could make carp taste like salmon and squirrel taste like chicken. This was because the boarders were often day laborers who brought various "food" items back to offset some of the cost of the rent. Even so my great grandparents came from Italy where there was no heat, no electricity, no running water etc. They saved a bunch of money and ended up buying up a bunch of property, much of which is still in the hands of my family today. Like many people at the time they were strongly pro-FDR and the Democrats.

Last edited by Randomstudent; 09-12-2011 at 11:05 PM..
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Old 09-13-2011, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
3,685 posts, read 6,207,690 times
Reputation: 3632
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamofmonterey View Post
My great-aunt grew up in the Depression. her husband was a freemason and saved...she lived in the same house 60 years after he died, no kids.She lived alone many years and was self-sufficient-money wasnt her main thing, but she lived penuriously.

Once she paid her plumber by giving him the antique Packard she had in her garage. She never trusted banks and hid money in the house....she had a great social life, lived to be 90 and died a multi-millionaire-they truly were the greatest generation, survived through a great deal.
I shoulda been a plumber!
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Old 09-13-2011, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 74,767,178 times
Reputation: 27602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
It seems many have not, they seem so surprised by an economic downturn, blow it out of proportion and seem unable to cope or imagine life with sacrifices.
Read "The Fourth Turning". It's an eye opener.
It's views history as cyclic with the cycles repeating rather than the straight timeline we were all taught in school.

The last generation that lived during the Great Depression are in their 80's and 90's now if still living.

Boom and busts are cyclic with each person experiencing both at least once in their lifetime. And it goes on to theorize that these major busts (depression/war/etc) happen about once every 80 years.
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Old 09-13-2011, 07:17 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,299 posts, read 12,547,783 times
Reputation: 8057
Quote:
I shoulda been a plumber!
No kidding. Maybe the conversation went like this:

Plumber: "Ok, the grand total on your bill is going to $613.87. How do you want to pay that?"

Auntie: "Oh my. That's quite a lot. I do have a little money here and there ..... but you know, I don't ever drive my car anymore. I bought it new for $700, but I've only taken a ride in it twice ..... both times I felt too ill to walk the 3 miles to church, and so my son drove me in it. But I'm sure it's still worth almost as much as I paid for it. Would you like to take that instead of cash?"

Plumber (quickly figuring how close to $50,000 he could get for it): "Ummmm ..... well, I don't usually do something like that ..... but seeing as how you're so special to me as a customer, I could make an exception this one time!"
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