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Old 01-04-2009, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by car54 View Post
My buddy told me that humans and kitty cats are the only animals that consume milk in adulthood (and the milk of another species, at that).
Cats like the vast majority of animals are lactose intolerant as adults. Most humans are also lactose intolerant as adults, just particular groups can digest lactose as adults (Most people of European origin being one of them).
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Old 01-04-2009, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Humanoid View Post
Cats like the vast majority of animals are lactose intolerant as adults. Most humans are also lactose intolerant as adults, just particular groups can digest lactose as adults (Most people of European origin being one of them).
I knew this was true about adult cats....but not the part about humans. Very interesting. I wonder if this is due to decades of many people choosing to use formula instead of breast feeding....unlike many of the other countries outside of US/Europe.
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Old 01-04-2009, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Humanoid View Post
You can't digest vegetables or legumes? Why is that? How do you stay healthy?


Not to be a broken record but there are no proteins in meat that can't be found in vegetables and/or legumes. So, if your diet didn't work for you its because it wasn't a good diet, not because you needed "meat protein" to thrive. But this is a problem with proponents of veganism, etc they often pretend as if there is a one size fits all diet and there isn't.


The grocery stores seem to hate to lower the sticker price. The sale on milk has lasted months now...and its actually gotten cheaper. Costco seems to be the only store that doesn't mind adjusting the price downward.
Not all veggies... and you have to remember that what you get out of a small portion of meat equals much much more veggies. As the origional poster said, and you have said there is no one size fits all diet. Before going on any new kind of diet everyone should know how they handle what kind of foods and if they get benefit from them, and look to see if that diet will provide enough. If you are sensitive to bean/legumes for instance...

Hmmm. Hoping that Walmart has discounted milk again. I could get whole milk from a dairy for 2.00 a gallon and if I could get my hands on some of this excess milk power could make that into four gallons...

For some reason the USDA milk power tastes better, never have figured that out.

To make this on topic, as everyone had different needs in food, while some things may be reduced in consumption and some will increase, the dairy farms and ranches will not dissapear, nor will they turn into farms growing veggies. The diversity of the American diet is a strength rather than a weakness.
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Old 01-04-2009, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
Not all veggies... and you have to remember that what you get out of a small portion of meat equals much much more veggies.
Although this is true of vegetables, its not true of all non-meat sources of protein like nuts and legumes. For example 100 grams of almonds have around 22 grams of protein, where as 100 grams of steak depending on the cut has anywhere from 24~30 grams of protein.

The only real issue when not eating meat is to make sure you are getting all the necessary amino-acids. Unlike meat, most non-animal sources of protein don't contain all the necessary amino-acids so you need to eat a variety of high protein vegetables, nuts, legumes. Of course, if you are just a vegetarian you can easily get it from dairy/eggs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
The diversity of the American diet is a strength rather than a weakness.
I think the complete opposite, in fact I think that is why Americans do so badly with Vegetarianism/Veganism. Outside of meat and dairy the typical American diet contains very little protein because Americans consume such a small selection of available vegetables, fruits, nuts and legumes. Where as for example Indians don't have a big problem with it.


Regardless, meat and dairy are expensive so it won't be surprising if people start moving away from them.
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Old 01-04-2009, 11:13 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
.....People really are much more idiosyncratic in food tolerances than most folks realize. Roughly 10 to 15% of people either have celiac or other sensitivities to wheat and gluten. Irritable bowl syndrome can make coarse roughage like in whole grains and some vegetables a major problem for others. There are known allergies to peanuts and tree nuts. Many people can't tolerate the nightshades, such as tomatoes, peppers and potatoes. Some of this is sorted out in the book "Eat Right For Your Blood Type," which points out that type A people can easily go vegetarian, but that some type O people find that type of diet actively unhealthful and do much better on meat.
.....
I've been meaning to read that book, it seems to be saying some things similar to what I believe according to what people have told me. Different blood types would be associated with different environmental stresses - probably type O conferred some sort of survival advantage among some ethnic or racial groups, and types A or B offered advantages to other typed. It might well be that celiac disease (which is an allergy to a PROTEIN found in some grains such as wheat) became more common in populations that didn't need much in the way of grains to survive, but needed type O for some other advantage.

It's interesting how some people can handle animal proteins but not gluten or nut proteins ..... others are fine with plant proteins, but can't handle milk or eggs!

That's one of the reasons I say it's a good idea to start off with approximately the diet your ancestors had adapted to, if they mostly came from one part of the world, and if you can determine what that diet might have been like (not always an easy thing to find out!) My ancestors probably went light on plant foods and heavy on dairy and meat, like many Europeans who lived at higher altitudes. The different seasons would have had an impact on food types also.
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Old 01-05-2009, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Yes
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Looks like I started something with the Soy Milk comment lol

I never said I was a vegetarian though. I still eat my fair share of chicken and roast beef w/ vegetables, breads, chips, etc. I just happen to have become lactose intolerant about a year ago and I like the taste of Soy Milk + it's where I now get my calcium. Sucks though because now I have to take a lactaid pill if I want to eat pizza.
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Old 01-05-2009, 12:44 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
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You shouldn't have a problem with most cheeses, oscottscotto, I'm pretty sure they don't have much of any lactose. My cheddar cheese label says there's only one gram of carb and zero of sugars per ounce, and I know cheese is allowed on low carb diets.
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Old 01-05-2009, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
You shouldn't have a problem with most cheeses, oscottscotto, I'm pretty sure they don't have much of any lactose.
So they tell you they have a problem with it, but because you think cheese doesn't have much lactose (not accurate in general) they shouldn't.

The amount of lactose in cheese is directly related to how long the cheese is aged, as the bacteria use the lactose as a food source. Some cheeses have just as much lactose as milk does, where as some have very little. Most of the more mild cheeses eaten by Americans have a fair amount of lactose (Also, cheeses that age less cost less). Mozzarella tends to have a decent amount of lactose in it, which would explain why they aren't able to eat pizza.
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Old 01-05-2009, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Yes
2,660 posts, read 6,154,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
You shouldn't have a problem with most cheeses, oscottscotto, I'm pretty sure they don't have much of any lactose.
Oh trust me, my favorite food for 27 years (I'm 28) is now off limits without a lactaid pill before hand. Sucks, but my stomach is the extreme expert on that lol. And yes, typical mozerella (the only cheese I eat) has a fair amount of lactose in it. No pizza, no milk and cereal, and no flat-out milk (the only three things I really took in with lactose). Of course, my eating habits have gotten alot healthier because of having to leave these off I've moved on to more chicken and spinich and such.
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Old 01-05-2009, 03:37 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,299 posts, read 12,554,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Humanoid View Post
So they tell you they have a problem with it, but because you think cheese doesn't have much lactose (not accurate in general) they shouldn't.
I'm just going by what my doctor told me (for a low carb diet) and what the cheddar cheese nutritional label said. Some people are told in a generic way that they should eat no dairy products for their intolerance, which isn't true of butter in normal amounts nor of the cheeses I eat.

Yogurt seems to bother some people but not others.

Another complication is that there are other intolerances and bowel conditions with similar symptoms to lactose intolerance (at one time I mistakenly thought I had the problem, which went away after eating yogurt daily).
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