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Old 01-11-2009, 12:51 PM
 
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Life expectancy has been climbing for, well, the last couple hundred years I believe:



In addition there are still a lot of countries that have fairly low life spans, like Afghanistan etc. We here in the US are extremely lucky, access to healthy food, clean water, medical treatment, etc.

On a side note I noticed the more money I made the less money I needed to live on (I could reduce expenses such as car insurance deductibles) but the more money I spent on luxuries.
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:54 PM
 
12,872 posts, read 22,659,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof Woof Woof! View Post
But I started this thread to get an idea of how much people need to spend each month to live. Do you think could share some of that info instead?
Why do you need to know what others spend? Write down your bills and that is what you spend. Or are you looking for ideas to save money?

If you're single I imagine you really just "need":

Food $150/month
Water free-$30/month
Shelter free (barter) to $ a few hundred bucks to rent a room out

Car: optional unless you have a job that you need it for, $100/month for beater mx
Car Insurance: see above most beater car insurance is cheap, $20/month or so unless you have a bad record
Gasoline: Depending on job location - $20-$50/month on average I'd guess

Things you don't need:
Cell phone
Home phone
TV/Cable
Internet
Memberships
Pets
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:01 PM
 
4,182 posts, read 5,908,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof Woof Woof! View Post
ndfmnlf:

Interesting statistics and you've certainly done your fair share of research! This might be a good topic for a new thread.

But I started this thread to get an idea of how much people need to spend each month to live. Do you think could share some of that info instead?

Thanks!

Woofers

Your question is about poverty thresholds. The Census Bureau has data on poverty thresholds Poverty Thresholds for 2007 by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years (http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/threshld/thresh07.html - broken link)

Poverty threshold is the minimum level of income needed to attain an adequate standard of living. "In 2007, in the United States of America, the poverty threshold for a single person under 65 was US$10,787; the threshold for a family group of four, including two children, was US$21,027."
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Texas
8,062 posts, read 16,484,334 times
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My bills would total $435 per month if I dropped my car insurance down to liability and uninsured motorist (and made my son pay for his own car insurance!) and if I got rid of cable TV. I'm only paying for utilities and insurances. I can't get rid of my Internet service because it's so necessary since I'm homebound. I use it to pay bills, shop, etc. Add about $250 for food, gas, doctor and prescription copays, etc. and I need a minimum of $685 per month.

I analyzed my expenses recently and it truly does stink how much goes for insurances -- car, home, and medical. In almost 30 years of driving, I've never had an accident/car insurance claim. Sheesh, I've given them a lot in premiums over the years!
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Old 01-11-2009, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Some place very cold
5,500 posts, read 20,489,922 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teatime View Post
I analyzed my expenses recently and it truly does stink how much goes for insurances -- car, home, and medical. In almost 30 years of driving, I've never had an accident/car insurance claim. Sheesh, I've given them a lot in premiums over the years!
Yeah, those are the big ones for sure!
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:07 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,177,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndfmnlf View Post
. If in 1911 the life expectancy was 47 years, that means 47 years is the age at which most people were expected to die. In 1999, people were expected to die at age 77. There's no other explanation for this other than that more people in 1999 were living longer into their 70s and 80s.
That is not correct. The life expectancy means the *average* NUMBER OF YEARS from your time of birth that you are expected to live. If a large number of babies are born and die very young that lowers the life expectancy. The reason that life expectancy has increased is because the infant mortality rate has dropped significantly from this time period.

If you READ anything about history, you will find that even in the eras when life expectancy was very very very low, there were still SCADS of old people around. Look at our founding fathers - MOST of them lived to be in their 70s,80s and even 90s. Look at our presidents List of United States Presidents by age - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia from George Washington in 1799 through Woodrow Wilson in 1913, (28 presidents) there were only five presidents who did not make it to 60. And four of those (Abe Lincoln and James Garfield, Chester B Arthur and William McKinley) were asassinated.

Think about Alexander Graham Bell, Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, Ben Franklin, etc., etc., the list is endless. There have always been lots of old people regardless of the year. The reason that we have more old people now is because we HAVE MORE PEOPLE.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Some place very cold
5,500 posts, read 20,489,922 times
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Okay, everyone. Thanks for participating in the thread. I appreciate all your responses.

Best of luck to everyone in this tough economy!

Woofers (a.k.a. woof x3)
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:33 PM
 
2,779 posts, read 4,804,094 times
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Woof (x3) - We have two kids (one in private school) and a mortgage so our expenses now are around $4200 a month. A lot but pretty standard I think for a family of four in the burbs.

But, I wanted to tell you that I lived in NYC when I was in my early 20s on $1200 net a month. And my rent was $1000! Utilities were included. My parents bought me a mattress and boxspring and took me to the grocery store on their yearly visits. I lived on tuna melts and cheap ice cream so I could go sip my beer (only one all night long, had to make it last!) at the bars on the weekends. Oh and it was wonderful, tons to do for free.

I'm not recommending a move to New York but wanted to just show that you don't necessarily have to live somewhere cheap to live cheaply.
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,177,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof Woof Woof! View Post
Branson,

This is very impressive! How do you manage to live on $12K a year? Are you sure that is all you spend?

I think I could learn a thing or two from someone like you. How do you manage?

Wx3
I can't tell if you are being condescending or are genuinely interested. LOL

We don't have television, we don't rent/go to movies. We live in a single-wide mobile home that was manufactured in 1989, it is a little over 700 square feet in size (14X56).

One of our cars is 16 years old the other one is 8 years old. They are, however, well maintained. Last week we spent $450 to get a new water pump and flush the fluids). The Explorer is due for a new set of ball joints soon too!

I shop in thrift shops almost exclusively. Except for underwear, I have not spent $100 in a "real" retail store in the past 10 years. Our couch was purchased in 1984 from a Payless type rental place for $135. We have cats and it is a mess, but we throw a cover on it and it is fine to sit on. My dh's "stereo system" is from the 1980s. Everything in our house (except for a Buddha statute and our mattress and box spring) was purchased in a thrift shop or salvaged from curbside or dumpsters.

What we do spend money on is eating out (too much) and food. We spend about $400 - $500 per month on food expense (there is just two of us). We buy grass fed beef and pork from local suppliers. We also buy free range chicken and eggs. It is much more expensive but the food is better and better for you. Also, in the summer we have a big garden and we preserve as much of that food as possible.

Many people might think that we live a spartan existence and that we are "miserable" because of our frugal lifestyle. This is not the case, we enjoy our lives very much and live this way because we choose to - not because we have to. Being frugal means that we have the luxury of having one of us stay home full time (to tend the garden and work around the homestead), while the other one works.

There you have the big points! LOL And if you were being condescending then.....

20yrsinBranson
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Old 01-11-2009, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,521 posts, read 27,018,476 times
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We have never counted on social security because we really don't think it will be there by the time we qualify so my husband planned very carefully.

It greatly depends on where you live and how easily entertained you are. If you are high maintenance or you love to go out to eat and shop all the time you need a lot of money to live on.

We are very simple. We love the outdoors, love to build, and basically just love being together. We live within our means and shop by "value". Life is very good and it's not because of things.

We have no mortgage.
Property taxes $128.00 per year.
No electric bill- we are off grid.
No water or sewer bill.
Propane- @$1000.00 per year.
Phone- pre paid cell that we hardly use- $15-$20 per month.
Free books and videos from the library.
Medical Ins. and prescriptions- $2200.00 per year.
Car paid
Insurances- $1000.00 per year.
Gifts- $400.00 per year.
Clothing- $100.00 per year.
Gas-under $1000.00 per year
Satellite TV and Internet(our biggies)- $1800.00 per year.
Food-$400.00 per month and we eat really well. This year I will be growing a lot of our own veggies.(We eat out maybe twice a year)

All in all we can live very inexpensively if we had to. We do spend money on our property and sometimes travel. We are not cheap by any means as we have everything we could ever want but we don't spend much on everyday things. This year was a whopper though because we built our house but it is a great future investment. Like I said "value".
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