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Old 01-14-2009, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Sitting on a bar stool. Guinness in hand.
4,429 posts, read 5,813,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatguywho View Post
What they did not tell you is the same weather pattern that caused the dust bowl is now causing the drought for the last few years in the south...and the hurricanes in florida.
Some accurate predictions by Bob - Some of the accurate predictions from my articles about the ...

Yes I noticed this weather for the past couple of years and couple that with a growing demand on a strained infrastructure because of a exponential growth in population in the south, leads me to speculate that the upper great lakes area will be the place to live in the coming decades. Granted I could be wrong. But I think (only my opinion) that is where a sustainable and comfortable (semi comfortable for those who hate the cold) living will be had. And the great news for people that are thinking the same way I am is that it's pretty damned cheap to buy at this point in a lot of market. So there maybe major profits to be had in if the population does return in droves.
Let me also say that the state in the rust belt and NY state must also start at this time to find new industries and businesses to entice more people to emigration into those states as well as changing some to there governmental controls and limitation on businesses to spur that growth of new businesses.

We will see if I'm right in 10 years or so (this ain't a quick buck thing) but I think this is the direction the movement of the U.S. Population is headed.
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:09 PM
 
20,377 posts, read 18,393,843 times
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Just say no to the bailout and turn a deaf ear to the government when they tell you to spend spend spend and go deeper into debt.
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:17 PM
 
706 posts, read 1,188,690 times
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Not to go off on a weather tangent, but if we ever get serious about manufacturing again in this country, the great lakes will be positioned to make a big comeback. Availability of water is going to be a prime issue in the near future and where better than the great lakes?
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Fort Myers Fl
2,305 posts, read 2,753,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyP View Post
Not to go off on a weather tangent, but if we ever get serious about manufacturing again in this country, the great lakes will be positioned to make a big comeback. Availability of water is going to be a prime issue in the near future and where better than the great lakes?
Very true, but it is to damn cold up there!
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:54 PM
 
Location: USA
3,966 posts, read 9,629,594 times
Reputation: 2200
Market is crashing, yet people are still buying eletronics and calling me for support. People are still going to mcdonnalds to buy sunday breakfast. Cops are still arresting drug users and drunk drivers taking them to jail, needing a lawyer to go to court which has a judge and another lawyer...

See where im going with this? How does everyone all of a sudden not have money and the great depression is here. There is still money flowing and maybe the dollar is going down the tubes and the cost of items will skyrocket because of it. But the true survivers will still work, maybe require some homegrown stuff, ect.

Im thinking of a downsizing of overused items in the united states vs a depression like the 20's where people would starve to death.

Any of you finance geeks can correct me.
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Old 01-15-2009, 04:21 PM
 
706 posts, read 1,188,690 times
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I would rather think there are areas of the country that are in depression. For example Michigan, where I just read the average price of a home sale is $56,000. Over 60% of all sales are foreclosures. Unemployment is double digits officially. There are other areas I'm sure, but the overall economy nationwide isn't at depression levels.
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Old 01-15-2009, 07:53 PM
 
28,453 posts, read 73,577,247 times
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Default But but but but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyP View Post
I would rather think there are areas of the country that are in depression. For example Michigan, where I just read the average price of a home sale is $56,000. Over 60% of all sales are foreclosures. Unemployment is double digits officially. There are other areas I'm sure, but the overall economy nationwide isn't at depression levels.
... the EXPERT said so...

There are a tremendously bleak folk in the media (and on many web sites) that want to see only the downsides of things. In a more balanced view it is clear that while there are some very distressed areas of the economy, and the general mood is quite down, there are also tremendous opportunities.

Sadly too few former autoworkers have skills that are in demand, but a smaller number of people are TREMENDOUSLY skilled. The automotive engineers with the knowledge to put the ability to OVER PRODUCE vehicles will eventually be married to the higher tech vehicles with alternative power sources and great things can happen. The timelines for these kinds of changes are hard to predict, but somehow I think that some signficant progress could be seen in 20-36 months...
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Old 01-15-2009, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Loving life in Gaylord!
4,121 posts, read 7,963,073 times
Reputation: 3900
I'm from Michigan and have been told, we have been in a deep recession maybe mini depression for many years. I can tell you now it has been bad for auto workers, but other than that I have not noticed a big downturn in my life, or anyone I know for that matter. I live in a town of about 17,000 and it's going strong. Other cities are also going strong. I think Detroit is about the worst off city, but they are talking about hiring thousands in the next few years to build the batteries for the electric cars. Of course housing in and around Detroit is bad, but other than that prices are decent. I am actually watching some housing prices in the northern lower part of our state, and can get a fantastic deal on some awesome houses in some beautiful areas, so I love it! The 60,000 houses are in Detroit and are crap. I plan on paying around
120-$130,000 for a 1500 sq. Ft. House in the next year or so, which is a normal price for a good house in that area, or any good area. I've always believed that you get used to things and find ways to get by when things get bad. We here in the hard hit areas have been in this mode for quite a while, so we may me in a good position to recover quicker. I guess you either adapt to the situations this life gives you and become stronger....or die.
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Old 01-16-2009, 02:19 AM
 
253 posts, read 975,397 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by w1ngzer0 View Post
Market is crashing, yet people are still buying eletronics and calling me for support. People are still going to mcdonnalds to buy sunday breakfast. Cops are still arresting drug users and drunk drivers taking them to jail, needing a lawyer to go to court which has a judge and another lawyer...

See where im going with this? How does everyone all of a sudden not have money and the great depression is here. There is still money flowing and maybe the dollar is going down the tubes and the cost of items will skyrocket because of it. But the true survivers will still work, maybe require some homegrown stuff, ect.

Im thinking of a downsizing of overused items in the united states vs a depression like the 20's where people would starve to death.

Any of you finance geeks can correct me.
Of course many people are still living above their means and stubbornly refusing to cultivate financial responsibility and awareness.

Yeah there is as small percentage that is doing extremely well...because they were very well off to begin with, but again they don't represent most.
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Old 01-16-2009, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Parker, CO
1,110 posts, read 2,824,561 times
Reputation: 1880
If we're in a depression, then I guess that depressions aren't THAT bad. I know that things are bad, but the world hasn't stopped turning.
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