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Old 01-15-2009, 08:40 AM
Rei
 
Location: Los Angeles
494 posts, read 1,649,571 times
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Quote:
I would be pretty cautious about getting into any service industry that is financial, informational or intellectual in character.
That only leaves government and health....
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Old 01-15-2009, 08:48 AM
 
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The smart thing would be to go on to graduate school and work on the side.

A lot of people are going to be reaching retirement age soon. The average age in the Northern Virginia government workforce is supposed to be in the low to mid 50's.
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Old 01-15-2009, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
17,031 posts, read 27,561,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lchoro View Post
The smart thing would be to go on to graduate school and work on the side.

A lot of people are going to be reaching retirement age soon. The average age in the Northern Virginia government workforce is supposed to be in the low to mid 50's.
Good point in the next 8 years there will be significant turnover in the workforce. You would like to have 5 yrs experience by then.
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Old 01-15-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,308 posts, read 35,242,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rei View Post
That only leaves government and health....
I really meant that it may be wise to consider an industry that builds, designs, engineers, manufactures or otherwise produces tangibles.

Phillip-Morris comes to mind as a recession proof entity... Kind of the opposite of health-care, though...
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Old 01-15-2009, 11:01 AM
 
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Why not go ahead and graduate and go straight into grad school?
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Old 01-15-2009, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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OK guys - What segments are hiring? I may need a job after I retire.
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:23 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
24,598 posts, read 42,239,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
Why not go ahead and graduate and go straight into grad school?
Not always a good idea, depends on your discipline. (science / math - maybe OK... engineering +/-(more minus for ME / Civil), business - no, Health care - definately - no)

Many grad schools require 3-5 yrs experience BEFORE grad school, and often the 'seasoned' grad students with some work experience are more valuable to the learning environment of others and themselves. (Plus less risk of taking something you're gonna hate.

my choices...(your mileage may vary)
1) international travel / language & culture immersion (Don't be a tourist... live with the locals)

2) Peace Corp or similar (not fun, but often a good 'attitude adjustment')

3) explore a career you may later 'wish' you had tried, but thought it was too silly at the time. (Go where your heart leads you)
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,478 posts, read 52,823,640 times
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In these times forget your heart and go for the money. Pay your debt down as fast as possible by living a frugally as possible. Live in a cheap apartment or shared rental house. Cook your own food. Only buy used cars. I recommend cars (Nissan, Honda, Toyota, Subaru) just hitting the 100 k range. Live in a warm part of the country to avoid huge fuel bills. Borrow nothing!
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Chino, CA
1,458 posts, read 3,006,916 times
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Interesting premise, but I don't really agree with the delaying graduation part... but probably going on to grad school and working part-time seems more feasible. At least then you are still improving yourself instead of just delaying.

When I graduated with my bachelors the economy just went through the .com bust.... The year before I graduated I was going through the college recruiting and interviewing process and was able to get a few rounds of interviews for some fairly prestigious firms. Then 9/11 happened, and we all know how things contracted after that... so least to say, the firms that were recruiting all of a sudden had a hiring freeze. When I graduated, I had little prospect and had to get anything I could get.

If I were to have graduated just a few years earlier, my potential income, connections, resume, etc. could of been drastically different. If I had graduated a couple years later, I could of probably got into a better firm because of the hiring/growth from the housing boom.

Instead, I had to find anything I could get and have had to work through the ranks to get experience and worked for a smaller company for quite a few years.

Anyhow, I made the best of it, and worked full time while also going to graduate school part-time. They were tough years, but now I have both my masters and bachelors and numerous years of experience (the good thing about smaller firms is that you get to get your hands into everything vs. being highly specialized/restricted in larger firms). But of course, I wonder how things would of been if I graduated a few years earlier or later and got into a larger firm and had that on my resume.

From what I can tell in many fields... sadly, it's who you worked for that gets you the better jobs rather than what you did. Part of that Cover your ass when you hire thing. He worked for IBM, so he must be good

-chuck22b

Last edited by chuck22b; 01-15-2009 at 12:50 PM..
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Old 01-15-2009, 02:09 PM
 
16,434 posts, read 19,667,831 times
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The hard truth is, it's going to be a tough job market for a long time.
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