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Old 05-16-2009, 08:52 AM
 
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I am running into so many people who are unemployed or underemployed or not able to go back to college to gain job skills, or participate in professional development. All can be blamed on the recession.

I am starting to be concerned that maybe a whole generation of people may be hurt by this terrible economy. I am not talking about putting food on the table or paying the rent, most people will figure out a way to do that even if it involves working three minimum wage jobs. What I am talking about is the incredibly large number of Americans who are not able to do the type of work that they are talented in. Accountants and Financial Analysts who are working as Check Out Clerks for $7.00 an hour at the grocery store, Marketing Specialists working at Fast Food and IT Professionals working at Walmart. Or Engineers sitting at home all day watching television.

So many talented people with so many skills unable to use them. Isn't this one of the true causalities of the recession?
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 5,441,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
I am running into so many people who are unemployed or underemployed or not able to go back to college to gain job skills, or participate in professional development. All can be blamed on the recession.

I am starting to be concerned that maybe a whole generation of people may be hurt by this terrible economy. I am not talking about putting food on the table or paying the rent, most people will figure out a way to do that even if it involves working three minimum wage jobs. What I am talking about is the incredibly large number of Americans who are not able to do the type of work that they are talented in. Accountants and Financial Analysts who are working as Check Out Clerks for $7.00 an hour at the grocery store, Marketing Specialists working at Fast Food and IT Professionals working at Walmart. Or Engineers sitting at home all day watching television.

So many talented people with so many skills unable to use them. Isn't this one of the true causalities of the recession?
This sort of thing has been going on for Xers since the mid 80s. The nation has followed the path towards job outsourcing for twenty years. It is now coming to its conclusion. Now its not the Xers that are only hurting but the Y generation is also getting the shaft. I recall graduating college in the mid 90 and finding nothing but crummy commission base service jobs. You don't sell, you don't eat. I wonder who is eating now.
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:50 AM
 
2,197 posts, read 6,936,670 times
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It will affect more than one generation, and it won't end with the recession.

We have adopted this attitude that everyone needs to/must go to college, when so many of the essential jobs do not require a college degree. Electricians, plumbers, gardeners, housekeepers, truck drivers and appliance repairpersons demand more per hour than many college grads. Their jobs remain in demand, while a glut of overeducated, disenfranchised workers chase jobs that no longer exist... or exist in India and Asia.

There's an imbalance between wants and needs. Many boomtime jobs have vanished for good, as Corporate America downsizes and business landscapes are redefined. The job market is a game of musical chairs and not everyone is going to get the chair they want. Some aren't going to get a chair at all.
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Old 05-16-2009, 09:58 AM
 
Location: NH and lovin' it!
1,780 posts, read 3,601,813 times
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Just take a look at the Great Depression generation. They are/have been captains of industry, banking and any other business you can think of.
I think the outcome has more to do with relying on our own resources, being flexible and the necessity of hard work in order to succeed.
Sure it hurts, but the qualities that come out of a recession/depression are, well, priceless.
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Old 05-16-2009, 10:31 AM
 
223 posts, read 488,156 times
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I think that the economoy will affect mutliple genrations as well. My husband and I were talking about this the other night. It is unfortunate that we will be spending the best of years of our lives in such a bleak economy. It makes my generation very angry at the decisions made by those before us, and I am sure that future generations will feel the same way. The baby boomes had it great there for a while, and now everything is falling apart. It will take a long time to rebuild what has been lost.
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Old 05-16-2009, 11:09 AM
 
28 posts, read 76,754 times
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Default What worries me too

The quality of work in some trades and businesses is going down hill fast. Nobody cares for many reasons like smaller pay and bad management. Management is so hung up with their numbers that they are now taking it out on the worker and consumer. Repairs on autos will be done as cheap as they can get away with and it seems to me everyone is ripping everyone off for their bottom line. I know of one bmw mechanic (20's) who replaced an expensive part on a new bmw under warranty and was suspended for a week with no pay. He was always complemented on what a great mechanic he is and then wham! The manager has to make the numbers work so take it out on the worker.....this is scary! From many stories its the little guy that is taking the brunt of all of this. I'm seeing a separation more than ever of the lower class to higher class. The wealthier class of people really have no idea what is going on with the lower class.....which is growing at an alarming rate. Everybody has a sad story. The middle class is now the lower class as their pay has taken a large cut. With so many out of work, good workmanship doesn't get you anywhere anymore, as long as you are cheap labor.
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Old 05-16-2009, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,820 posts, read 9,469,975 times
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Smile I blame it on outsourcing overseas

Our good jobs are going away and have been. When our economy was growing, few noticed. We need to depend our ourselves again (America) and look within. We have taken care of the rest of the world long enough, too long in my book.

I have a client who went back to his homeland (he is a US citizen) and was shocked by the responses of those back there - "we have no money now; we are waiting for the U.S." -- these comments were from his family members in high ranking government positions. Makes you wonder.

Combined with the job losses, we have seen the devaluation of wealth across all classes. That's a large problem also.
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 5,441,064 times
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My wife and I also had a long conversation about how things got this way since the outcome was obvious. Was it because people were greedy, stupid, short sighted, or did not have the mental ability to use common sense? When we got married in 1995 and I went on job interviews I was shocked at what I saw. I never saw myself having to take over responsibility for the family business just to survive. The U.S. is the land of broken dreams. Interview after interview even back then showed how companies cared and gave little for their employees.
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Old 05-16-2009, 01:57 PM
 
975 posts, read 1,632,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stac2007 View Post
Was it because people were greedy, stupid, short sighted, or did not have the mental ability to use common sense?
I think that pretty much sums up the average American. Case closed.
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Old 05-16-2009, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 5,441,064 times
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Originally Posted by Traderx View Post
I think that pretty much sums up the average American. Case closed.
The real question is how do we get clean of all this. Can we ever go back to the time where it took only one person to support a family and the second salary was the icing on the cake? My parent's generaton never had it so good way back when.
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