U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-13-2009, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,228,132 times
Reputation: 4343

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
There are probably stats out there about the percentage of women in the work force today compared to 20, 30, 40 and 50 years ago
Of course there are, see:

PercentMenWomen.jpg (image)

But contrary to the picture you are trying to paint, the pace at which women joined the work force was steady between the 1940's and 1980's. There was no noticeable jump when boomer women started to become working age.

Regardless, yeah those in the GI generation had different ideas about gender roles. Personally, I think they mostly got it right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
I doubt that the vast majority of women from your age group would choose to permanently leave the work force even if finances made it possible.
I think the typical thing GI/Silent generation women did was stay home and raise their family and then work part-time when the kids got older. But at some point, staying home to raise a family was no longer respected by many (ahem...boomers). I see a lot of women in my age group and younger that are interested in being "stay at home moms".
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-13-2009, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,228,132 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
There is no should about it. That's your preference. In the real world, having a mortgage or not having a mortgage at ANY age is a choice. In the grand scheme of things, it matters very little that the mortgage situation is different from the previous generations. Things change! Let go of the past and be here now.
I do not believe financial matters are completely relative, its not just "preferences". Certainly, people should be able to do whatever they want....but its not just my preference that say building credit card debt by purchasing electronics is bad for you financially.

The difference in itself does not matter, what matters is that many of the boomer financial practices are ill-founded where as those of the previous generation were not. I think having a mortgage when you're in your 60's indicates a degree of financial mismanagement, of course there are exceptions (e.g., divorce, etc), but generally speaking.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,228,132 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
It's becoming clear the biggest mistake we boomers made was spending money we didn't have to send our kids to college at $100,000 a clip.
The number of boomers that did such a thing are by far the minority. After all if the boomers were so generous, why exactly do students today have so much more student loan debt than before?

Boomers rarely save money....as a result they had no money to support their kids education so the kids had to use loans. Of course the boomers benefited from a number of programs that made education affordable, but they were sure to do away with them once they were tax payers and the largest voting bloc.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,228,132 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by car54 View Post
Very high voting rates among seniors, coupled with the sheer number of Boomers means that we will be an overwhelming force at the polls far into the future. By the time we are out of the way, you will be in, or close to codgerhood yourdamnself!
Within a decade the boomers will be out numbered by a pretty large amount, enough to account for the differences in voting patterns. In terms of pensions, most of this is state level and even if the boomers manage to overwhelm the younger and raise taxes to cover their plush pensions the younger can vote with their feet and move to other states. I'm not really sure how its going to play out, all I know is that many states have way too plush pensions that are not viable long term.


Quote:
Originally Posted by car54 View Post
Also, unless you're trolling, I don't understand your concern with the entire matter? You keep saying you're self-employed....so how do you have a dog in this fight?
Taxes and investing. Just as the boomers moved the markets on their way up, they are likely to do it on the way down. But how...exactly? And how can as younger folks prevent our selves from being bag holders?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 07:46 AM
 
975 posts, read 1,631,093 times
Reputation: 524
And how can as younger folks prevent our selves from being bag holders?

You can't. You will be paying for the repercussions of this mess for the rest of your life. A lost generation so to speak and the first to experience a lower standard of living than their parents. As the deflationary spiral spins for the next decade or two your assets and income will be devastated while your debt service will explode.

Sorry, but your generation will go down in history as sort of a modern day dark age period where civilization takes a major step backwards. I feel bad for you. Personally I think I would kill myself if I were in your shoes.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 07:50 AM
 
1,822 posts, read 4,186,509 times
Reputation: 4921
How do you insulate from the flogging as a Gen Y? By disavowing things like the stock market and housing as a primary investment vehicle. You do these things, and the boomers are hosed.

As much as the boomers accuse younger generations of having an entitlement complex, I have in my life never found more a optimism-biased bunch as the boomers. The concept of "things are ONLY worth what someone else is willing to pay for them" completely eludes this group, as a collective. This is of course the source of such generational gems like "houses never depreciate" and "stock market and investing in it (401K) is WAY better retirement than a pension, but I'm keeping mine anyways".

Healthcare is a hot topic yet again and I think it will become quite evident in a decade or so the sheer disaster that awaits medicare and taxation in this country when the boomers hit the healthcare welfare rolls (Medicare). Forget SS, that's a sunk cost, Medicare is going to prove the big generational sticking point between the boomers and GenX/Y. The early boomers might be alright, but the late boomers are going to face the brunt of GenX/Y generational taxation disenfrachisment, and they (late boomers) may not fare so well, sans their precious voting block.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,805 posts, read 17,589,207 times
Reputation: 9435
John23 wrote:
With vietnam, the numbers killed now in iraq are much lower, but look at the post traumatic stress, and number of severe injuries. Watching your buddies come back now all screwed up isnt easy. There are wars in every generation.

Also, the threat now of dirty bombs, 9/11, chemical weapons, etc. Our airports have become militarized zones vs the 70's.
Unfortunately this rings very true. The differnece however, is that the folks going to the current wars are VOLUNTEERING. They are not being DRAFTED against their will. Until you have faced the threat of being drafted, there is no way to comprehend how that threat impacts your life. In that regard ( not having a draft ), the post boomer generations have it pretty darn good.

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 08-13-2009 at 09:30 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 09:19 AM
 
1,156 posts, read 3,439,197 times
Reputation: 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by hindsight2020 View Post
How do you insulate from the flogging as a Gen Y? By disavowing things like the stock market and housing as a primary investment vehicle. You do these things, and the boomers are hosed.

As much as the boomers accuse younger generations of having an entitlement complex, I have in my life never found more a optimism-biased bunch as the boomers. The concept of "things are ONLY worth what someone else is willing to pay for them" completely eludes this group, as a collective. This is of course the source of such generational gems like "houses never depreciate" and "stock market and investing in it (401K) is WAY better retirement than a pension, but I'm keeping mine anyways".

Healthcare is a hot topic yet again and I think it will become quite evident in a decade or so the sheer disaster that awaits medicare and taxation in this country when the boomers hit the healthcare welfare rolls (Medicare). Forget SS, that's a sunk cost, Medicare is going to prove the big generational sticking point between the boomers and GenX/Y. The early boomers might be alright, but the late boomers are going to face the brunt of GenX/Y generational taxation disenfrachisment, and they (late boomers) may not fare so well, sans their precious voting block.

Yes - I think what I perceive as boomer "entitlement" is actually what boomers would call optimism. To me, this is the big difference in the generations. There's a book I read, The Fourth Turning taht addresses a lot of these topics. It argues that every fourth generation the American psyche is sort of recycled.
Fourth Turning
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,813 posts, read 9,449,423 times
Reputation: 7805
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
The number of boomers that did such a thing are by far the minority. After all if the boomers were so generous, why exactly do students today have so much more student loan debt than before?

Boomers rarely save money....as a result they had no money to support their kids education so the kids had to use loans. Of course the boomers benefited from a number of programs that made education affordable, but they were sure to do away with them once they were tax payers and the largest voting bloc.
Rarely save money? Are you kidding me? Everyone I know puts away something - mostly in 401k's - we didn't have IRA's until 1979 or so, right? I know I live in an area where most are wealthier than I am but a lot of working people I know have cash in money markets sitting there waiting for the next opportunity and when to return to the stock market. Within the next 7 years, I hope to buy 3 homes in areas that may prosper, rent them out, then in 15 to 20 years, that will be my 401K. Yes, there will be mortgages on them but so what? They will be rented out. It's a good tax deduction. Not every boomer is the way you think.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2009, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
2,984 posts, read 5,435,937 times
Reputation: 1295
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Here is what I don't understand, why do you even have a mortgage? Even if you purchased your home when you were 30, it should be paid off right now. Lately, I've been finding that many boomers in their late 50's and 60's still have a sizable mortgage. Very different from the previous generation, my grandparents had no mortgage by the time they were 40.
When I was in banking many boomers would come in to the bank to take out home equity mortgages in order to purchase a second retirement/vacation home. Now that the real estate industry is smashed many boomers can't afford to retire. They can't find young buyers for their first super inflated homes and they are upside down on their second mortgage. Is it a matter of greed or bad decision making?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top