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Old 08-11-2009, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,210,220 times
Reputation: 4343

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
You have a lot to learn...
Completely vacuous.
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Old 08-11-2009, 12:41 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 5,196,191 times
Reputation: 6677
Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Completely vacuous.
Boring and vacuous? I must be moving up in the world!

Or were you just projecting again?
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Old 08-11-2009, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,210,220 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
Boring and vacuous? I must be moving up in the world!
Huh? I'm not saying anything about you...your sentence was vacuous. It accomplishes nothing...its just the sort of thing people say to make themselves feel superior to others. Don't worry, when you get older you'll understand
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Old 08-11-2009, 01:30 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 5,196,191 times
Reputation: 6677
Your argument regarding working without financial incentive tells a lot about what kind of person you are. I'm guessing that you really hate what you do every day, and you dread dragging yourself into the office every morning knowing that you'll never be much more than a wage slave. If that's true, you really do live a pathetic life.

I work for self fulfillment, and whether that work is volunteering, or pursuing a life goal for profit is irrelevant. While you may think that your parents should be frittering away their last days playing checkers so that you can beg for a higher wage, I'm enjoying every minute doing something I believe in, and making what I consider to be great money in the process.

And true to Jazz's experience, my work mainly deals with applying good old fashioned common sense to solving the problems that confuse PhDs.
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Old 08-11-2009, 01:49 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,470 posts, read 18,210,220 times
Reputation: 4343
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
Your argument regarding working without financial incentive tells a lot about what kind of person you are. I'm guessing that you really hate what you do every day, and you dread dragging yourself into the office every morning knowing that you'll never be much more than a wage slave.
Your guesses are not very good. I've never held a traditional full time job in my life. When I was a teenager I worked in some machine shops part-time, I quickly realized I could make more on my own than being exploited by some (ahem...boomer) boss. I have worked here and there part-time or on contract, but largely I've been self-employed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
While you may think that your parents should be frittering away their last days playing checkers so that you can beg for a higher wage...
Yeah, because the only thing to do besides work is play checkers. And I'll say it again, my post here has nothing to do with my particular situation. I learned when I was a teenager that the boomers would exploit me in any way they could, as a result I ignored their advice and did things to maximize my earnings rather then theirs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
And true to Jazz's experience, my work mainly deals with applying good old fashioned common sense to solving the problems that confuse PhDs.
Why is it that people with less education, went to so-so schools, etc always have a need to make these sorts of comments? Its amusing, why not just be happy with what you have?
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Old 08-11-2009, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
5,517 posts, read 9,409,301 times
Reputation: 2547
Quote:
Originally Posted by CosmicWizard View Post
I would venture a guess that my monthly expenses are no more, or perhaps even less than yours. My 11 year old car ( which I drive just 80 miles a week ) has been paid off for many years. My mortgage is less than it would cost to rent a home half as nice as the home ( under 2000 sf) I live in. If I so desired, I could quit my job tomorrow and get by very nicely on part time jobs every now and then. But I have no intention of doing that.
My car is 10 years old, also paid off, and I drive it about 50 miles a week. I live in a 900sqft house which I rent from my parents at a cut rate. I dont have cable, dont go out, dont buy new clothes until the old ones are thread bare, most of my electronics and furniture are donated or gifted.

Any how, without getting in to a pissing match about who has lower expenses, in my parking lot, there are 7 cars that are over 40k. Want to bet who they belong to?

Well, every one of them belongs to a manager, and all but 2 belong to someone over 50 years old, including a 100k Mercedes, and a 60k Mercedes.

Exactly two "mature" people in my building drive a car of any reasonable price, one of them is at a lower position then I am.

On the other hand, if you check the parking lot for the oldest and most beat up cars, they will all belong to people under 30 years old.
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Old 08-11-2009, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
5,517 posts, read 9,409,301 times
Reputation: 2547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskapat528 View Post
As far as dress in the workplace. Yes it makes a difference when one comes in with their midriff hanging out; this has nothing to do with generations but has to do with common sense and respect. WHY do you think so many companies have made dress codes?

Ironically, the older people in my office dress far more casual and poorly then the younger people.
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Old 08-11-2009, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,805 posts, read 17,572,960 times
Reputation: 9435
IMO the best combination is a team of people from different generations. My boss who is 35 brings a freshness if you will, while I at age 60 brings experience. In our case anyway, neither of us are overly attached to doing it our way. We have a mutual respect for one another instead of getting hung up in a generational war. We have a knack for getting things done for the benefit of the team instead of ingratiating our individual egos.


Randomdude: I'm not an advocte of expensive cars or big houses, so I tip my hat to your frugal lifestyle. The question is, will you maintain that frugality when your salary increases over the years and you have more disposable income? Only time will tell! The simple reason that most of the expensive cars belong to people over 50 is because they have built up their bank accounts from working many more years than you have at this point in your life. Some older folks can afford a few luxuries, and they don't need permission from you and me.

If you want to see a congregation of expensive cars, check out the parking lot at Cox High School.

Last edited by CosmicWizard; 08-11-2009 at 10:08 AM..
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Old 08-11-2009, 09:32 AM
 
Location: In My Own Little World. . .
3,238 posts, read 8,212,151 times
Reputation: 1609
I'm a boomer, aged 62, and I don't feel anywhere near retirement. I have two teenagers to put through school yet, and I'm just starting Paralegal training. DH and I both work full time at jobs that pay the bills, but don't really give (me anyway) a feeling of making a difference. I hope to "retire" from my current job when I'm 66 and then start doing something that will make a difference. In the meantime, get the kids through college, get all our bills (including mortgage) paid off, so we don't need much to live on.

My parent's generation had to deal with forced retirement. I saw my dad spend his retirement years mostly watching TV and shuffling grandchildren around (which he hated). When my mom was forced to retire at 65, my sister hired her part time to work in her office, which she did for another 10 years. She had a much more quality of life than my dad did.

After watching them, I know "retiring" is not for me. At least not until I can't get out of bed anymore.
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Old 08-11-2009, 10:25 AM
 
14,256 posts, read 16,231,844 times
Reputation: 13759
First of all ..... thanks to everyone for a very interesting discussion.

I'm 55 next birthday (1955 right in the middle of the Baby Boomer generation) and as I already said, I no longer have the passion, drive or energy for what is a very demanding job. In addition (and I was thinking about this last night), I no longer have the patience for the overlapping layers of process that keeps getting piled on my job by management, OGC and by government.

I love working with the really smart kids (22 - 30) that we hire and i am really impressed by their grasp of the technology but also by their level of comfort with the technolgy. But, despite that, here are a few examples of areas they are not so comfortable .....

1. I can cost a job either in my head or on the back of an envelope real quick and I am usually pretty much spot on with the result. I do not need a spreadsheet, a system and a process that takes three weeks.

2. I have been working since I was 14 ... that is since 1969. I might not have as much energy or drive as the kids but my experience helps me work smarter and keep us out of difficult situations. It also helps clean up the mess left by some of the kids.

3. Technology, social networking, etc. cannot and do not replace human contact.

Just like my generation looked down on our parents as being part of the problem and not part of the solution, so it is with the Gen Xers and the Gen Ys. However, the smart ones will see that we have a lot to offer and will benefit from that experience.

ps. what is with the bare midriffs and the flip flops?
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