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Old 04-16-2010, 12:53 PM
 
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It causes us to be much smarter shoppers.

To the supermarkets credt, they have the unit price posted on the shelves and that makes comparrison shopping a whole lot easier.

Check unit prices.

On smaller containers, I was shocked to see that there is a huge difference in unit prices.
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Old 04-16-2010, 02:06 PM
 
Location: 3rd Rock fts
749 posts, read 1,004,804 times
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Quote:
Has nothing to do with supply and demand and everything to do with reducing the quantity/volume of a product and keeping the same price. That's inflation pure and simple.
The company would not risk ‘shrinking’ the product (re-tooling costs, etc…) if there was no demand for that particular product. I disagree that the concept of Inflation is pure & simple as well.

Of course when inflation lingers on then the company can increase the size & brag to consumers that they’re getting 25% more for the same price. I call that: the way the economy works.
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Old 04-16-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,394,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myrc60 View Post
You are right. I've worked in the industry and price point is definitely a tool they use. They know you will notice you are getting less product but they know you wouldn't pay more for the same amount you got a few years ago.
I think fiddling around with food products is sort of a weird way of control over a population. It's like the debasement of a currency. You don't notice inflation of 2-3% a year in any particular year, but added up over time, it can be very harmful.

-Look at how fast food has changed in just the last 10-15 years. There's an emphasis on pictures, symbols. If you compared a McDonalds store in 1990 vs now, you'd see an noticable difference. These chains have such a subtle impact on the culture, with 12,000 McDonalds on every corner in the country. You don't need to "know" very much anymore to order at McDonalds, just point at the picture. How much simpler can it get?

And the burgers have changed, the meat has changed, the quality has definitely changed. A McDonalds burger has gone up X in price in the last 20-30 years. But the quality has gone down, the cost to produce has probably gone way down. Its a very stealth inflation, when you pay more for something every year, yet its cost to produce gets lower.

-Also the food sizes, calorie portions in the last 10-20 years. Big gulps, etc you didnt you to use to have. The medium drinks at a lot of fast food places can hardly fit in your car drink holder. And that's the "medium".

You dont realize how much you're being tricked in this society.
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Old 04-16-2010, 04:45 PM
 
12,869 posts, read 13,681,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
I think fiddling around with food products is sort of a weird way of control over a population. It's like the debasement of a currency. You don't notice inflation of 2-3% a year in any particular year, but added up over time, it can be very harmful.

-Look at how fast food has changed in just the last 10-15 years. There's an emphasis on pictures, symbols. If you compared a McDonalds store in 1990 vs now, you'd see an noticable difference. These chains have such a subtle impact on the culture, with 12,000 McDonalds on every corner in the country. You don't need to "know" very much anymore to order at McDonalds, just point at the picture. How much simpler can it get?

And the burgers have changed, the meat has changed, the quality has definitely changed. A McDonalds burger has gone up X in price in the last 20-30 years. But the quality has gone down, the cost to produce has probably gone way down. Its a very stealth inflation, when you pay more for something every year, yet its cost to produce gets lower.

-Also the food sizes, calorie portions in the last 10-20 years. Big gulps, etc you didnt you to use to have. The medium drinks at a lot of fast food places can hardly fit in your car drink holder. And that's the "medium".

You dont realize how much you're being tricked in this society.
at mcdonald's you can get a double cheeseburger for 1 dollar. (or 2 apple pies for a dollar) i think that is still a pretty good deal, especially if you eat cheeseburgers. i don't know who decided to start a war on the fast food industry lately.

why would you assume their cost to produce is dropping? real estate has been getting more expensive -so commercial real estate prices rose as well, although that may be changing in the future. food transportation costs certainly haven't dropped, with gas prices rising. i think mcdonald's (and a lot of fast food restaurants) are doing a pretty good job at holding their prices down. arby's shifted from the 5.01 cent meal to a dollar menu focus.

even regular restaurants are advertising lower prices since people are having to tighten their purses now. american industry is very good at adaptation when they aren't hampered.

on a side note, i have noticed a slow rise in pet food prices, with some canned cat foods at over 1 dollar apiece now, and an increase in dry food prices as well.
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Old 04-16-2010, 07:30 PM
 
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You're JUST noticing this? Reduction of sizes has happened for years now. Even before the recession.
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Old 04-16-2010, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,847 posts, read 2,125,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DSOs View Post
The company would not risk ‘shrinking’ the product (re-tooling costs, etc…) if there was no demand for that particular product. I disagree that the concept of Inflation is pure & simple as well.

Of course when inflation lingers on then the company can increase the size & brag to consumers that they’re getting 25% more for the same price. I call that: the way the economy works.
actually I know two products that have been shrunk, next time at the store take a look. Cheez-its and fritos
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Old 04-16-2010, 10:11 PM
 
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I am suspecting The boxed mac and cheese noodles are smaller. Is is my imagination or do They take less time to cook now? The noodles look different. And the american cheese slices are thinner now I swear it. Hey at least the calories go down with these newer smaller sizes right?
I also notice that when I shop in the ethnic food aisles, those products are more immune to the inflation-izing of the packaging sizes. Pretty much all still the same. Those products are not paying for their marketing I guess?
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Old 04-17-2010, 12:47 AM
 
3,324 posts, read 4,318,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
When they start skimping on the toilet paper rolls there will be an uprising !
Yes, an uprising of dirty laundry.....yuck!

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Old 04-17-2010, 02:19 AM
 
3,460 posts, read 5,188,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
When they start skimping on the toilet paper rolls there will be an uprising !
Check again. Last time I bought TP, the rolls were half an inch narrower than they used to be.
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Old 04-17-2010, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,394,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridasandy View Post
at mcdonald's you can get a double cheeseburger for 1 dollar. (or 2 apple pies for a dollar) i think that is still a pretty good deal, especially if you eat cheeseburgers. i don't know who decided to start a war on the fast food industry lately.

why would you assume their cost to produce is dropping? real estate has been getting more expensive -so commercial real estate prices rose as well, although that may be changing in the future. food transportation costs certainly haven't dropped, with gas prices rising. i think mcdonald's (and a lot of fast food restaurants) are doing a pretty good job at holding their prices down. arby's shifted from the 5.01 cent meal to a dollar menu focus.

even regular restaurants are advertising lower prices since people are having to tighten their purses now. american industry is very good at adaptation when they aren't hampered.

on a side note, i have noticed a slow rise in pet food prices, with some canned cat foods at over 1 dollar apiece now, and an increase in dry food prices as well.
At McDonalds specifically...

-Their cost of labor must be much lower now, vs 1990 or in the 80's. The minimum wage hasnt kept up at all with inflation.

-Their cost of production I'm sure has dropped. Either moving facilities overseas, or through efficiencies in their production facilities. It must be cheaper to produce at 12,000 mcdonalds now vs 5,000 or 4,000. The meat quality/bun quality isnt the same.

I think they have done a job good at keeping their prices low, but you really dont get much for your money. Their dollar double cheeseburger doesnt compare with a $5-7 burger at other restaurants.

I think the changes in food portions are weird though. Why do people suddenly need 64 ounce drinks and "super sizing", when they didnt need that 20 years. Do people now need more calories? Go back to the 50's and 60's and 70's, and the adult portions then at fast food places would probably be considered the kid size now. That's pretty strange in 30 years.
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