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Old 04-29-2010, 07:36 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 4,825,536 times
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Some are bullish cause they are caught up in and divided by the false left-right paradigm since they believe their side is cleaning up after the last side in power, these people seem to be the most out of touch with reality. Also the media is a crucial part of pumping up consumer confidence and are mostly interested in dividing people and ratings instead of accurate reporting. The current media is bascially worthless plus the government deliberately provides poor data to also pump up confidence. And some people are hopelessly optimistic no matter what and seem to have a very short memory. Most people will once again not see the next stage of this crisis. There are many potential catalyst to bring this house of cards down now which will happen.
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,664,177 times
Reputation: 27647
I'm hesitant to buy into the recovery because of what I see recovering which looks different this time.
Profits are up due to expense cuts in the US (layoffs) and increased foreign revenue with domestic revenue down. While I see people layed off, I don't see the jobs put "on hold"; instead I see the jobs going offshore and being done by a cheaper worker.

What does that say about the long term recovery ?? What do we recover to may be a better question. Many of these jobs are not coming back to US shores.
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Alaska & Florida
1,629 posts, read 5,014,391 times
Reputation: 834
We are in a recovery! We are no longer facing a financial collapse. The market will continue to increase. Companies will continue to beat earnings estimates. You can be bitter McCain lost the election and continue to be a bear or you can hop on board and ride the market until at least 2012.
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,068 posts, read 76,664,177 times
Reputation: 27647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonotastic View Post
We are in a recovery! We are no longer facing a financial collapse. The market will continue to increase. Companies will continue to beat earnings estimates. You can be bitter McCain lost the election and continue to be a bear or you can hop on board and ride the market until at least 2012.
There is more to a sustained recovery then a bull market bolstered with government bailout money.
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Old 04-29-2010, 10:15 PM
 
Location: NC
5,135 posts, read 2,132,245 times
Reputation: 2395
So that companies blowing out earnings reports (with increasing markets in the international AND domestic fronts) means absolutely nothing, eh?

Who am I talking about?
Apple, Goldman Saches (I know I know), EMC, Caterpillar, etc for examples.

Oh I know, this is because its against really low expectations from last year, right?

Guess what....that means things are improving--and the stock market is very forward looking.
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Old 04-30-2010, 12:44 AM
 
750 posts, read 1,345,742 times
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Stock market means very little to the everyday Joe. HappyTexan is right we are sending ton of jobs overseas. We are replacing good paying jobs with jobs at Sears. Low pay no benefits that is good how? Once all this bailout money is gone we will see how much of a recovery we have. I am thinking not much of one. Companies are making earnings by laying off workers in the US. Hiring workers in India and China not good. The Fed is still buying tons of paper with Fannie Mac ect just to make housing look good.
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Old 04-30-2010, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Alaska & Florida
1,629 posts, read 5,014,391 times
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Because I have virtually all my money in the market, I pay very close attention to every GDP report, consumer spending report, unemployment report etc. The economy is improving on multiple fronts, not just in Wall Street earnings. Unemployment is the only major front that has not been growing, which is okay because large increases in employment usually come at the very end of a recovery. The important thing is we are not loosing huge amounts of jobs anymore. People don't understand the purpose of bailouts. They are basically emergency loans. Many of the major financial institutions have already paid the government back. Some of these include Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, and American Express. The government has made a profit of $4 billion from the banks who have paid and are still paying their loans. If the government never bailed out these financial institutions we would have continued to see quarterly job losses in the hundreds of thousands and instability in our economy. I'm not saying every company that received bailout money will be able to pay us back, but I do believe we will get most of it back if not break even years down the road. It's much better than spending a trillion in Iraq, money that we will never get back and in fact now have to pay for support for the next million years. I don't want to start a debate about economic policies or politics, so I will just say time will tell. I strongly believe our economy will continue to improve over the next couple of years. I believe the stock market will continue to grow over the next couple of years.I believe reports on GDP, consumer spending, real estate etc will continue to improve over the next couple of years. You guys get my point. Look into the balance sheets and income statements of companies such as Google, Apple, Intel, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan etc and see whether they increased revenue or decreased expenses by laying off workers. Check it out yourself.

Also...outsourcing jobs is not something that is done only during poor economic times. It started a long time ago for reasons I will not talk about now because it will get the thread off topic. If you are interested send me a DM.
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Old 04-30-2010, 03:29 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
8,035 posts, read 11,819,045 times
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Collapse means a breakdown in deliveries of utilities and food to households and in civil order, not merely warps in the financial system due to credit policies designed to mask decline from the masses.

That doesn't mean that such a collapse could not happen, but the probability is still relatively small.

More on target, the standard of living for the average person in the countries of early industrialization, and those who lived on their coattails in the past three decades (e.g. Greece and Portugal) is visibly declining, certainly relatively, probably also in absolute terms, and the trend will continue.

Now that the design is unmistakeably unmasked, it seems horrible, but it is not that bad.

The outlook is okay for those in some way gainfully involved in the global economy, still bleak for those domestically stuck in a globally uncompetitive rut.

Of course the outlook is great for those at the helm of the financial warp and the new rules of the game for global distribution of production, income, and wealth.

The stock market is buoyed because the drops in the September 2009-March 2009 period were exaggerated and corporate earnings are beating expectations from that period, and because interest rates are just so low.

To be sure, the average worker of the "golden age" middle class continues to wade through a mine field (financial warp and global redistribution of production, income, and wealth), already having lost a foot, maybe a leg.

Good Luck!

Last edited by bale002; 04-30-2010 at 04:22 AM..
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Old 04-30-2010, 05:02 AM
 
12,869 posts, read 13,685,772 times
Reputation: 4453
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonotastic View Post
We are in a recovery! We are no longer facing a financial collapse. The market will continue to increase. Companies will continue to beat earnings estimates. You can be bitter McCain lost the election and continue to be a bear or you can hop on board and ride the market until at least 2012.
when a country is monetizing its own debt, what could possibly go wrong?
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Old 04-30-2010, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
1,194 posts, read 1,910,543 times
Reputation: 816
Look at Argentina, Germany, Zimbabwe. Or how about in 2008, with oil going up, up, and away.
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