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Old 07-24-2012, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,714 posts, read 31,259,789 times
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The average teacher in California is paid $69,434, 3rd highest in the nation.

The Ten States That Pay Teachers The Most (And Why It Doesn’t Matter) - 24/7 Wall St.
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:30 AM
 
17,183 posts, read 23,001,286 times
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Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
The average teacher in California is paid $69,434, 3rd highest in the nation.

The Ten States That Pay Teachers The Most (And Why It Doesn’t Matter) - 24/7 Wall St.
The problem with using average teacher salaries by state is that you are not taking cost of living into account. California also has the highest housing costs in the nation. The cost of living in California is very high in general. So if you are going to live in California, you better have a salary that allows you to get by.

I see your figures are from the Wall Street Journal. I am not sure that their averages are accurate.

http://www.payscale.com/research/US/...alary#by_State

According to this database, the average teacher salary in CA is $46,388 and MA is $44,438 and NY is $47,180
Now, if you take averages, you are not going to understand that for a teacher in NYC, that amount is far too low for living in Manhattan (I would assume the salary in NYC is going to be higher). In upstate NY, that salary will go much further, so if a teacher is in Buffalo, NY then the salary is probably going to be lower.

You just cannot go by state averages.

Last edited by nana053; 07-24-2012 at 10:31 AM.. Reason: add link
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Old 07-24-2012, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,714 posts, read 31,259,789 times
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The Sacramento Bee has a much different figure. Payscale is probably reporting a starting salary.

I don't think anyone believes the Payscale figure is the CA average.

See how well your school district pays its teachers, superintendent - Data Center - The Sacramento Bee
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:05 PM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 5,787,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
The Sacramento Bee has a much different figure. Payscale is probably reporting a starting salary.

I don't think anyone believes the Payscale figure is the CA average.

See how well your school district pays its teachers, superintendent - Data Center - The Sacramento Bee
You missed the very serious flaw in the Bee's data:
"Roughly 15 percent of districts -- most of them very small -- did not report 2011 teacher pay data to the state."
That pretty much means they remove all the salaries below the 1st standard deviation. That makes for a huge shift in mean or median salary (not clear which they are using).

I also wonder if they are including supplementals (in particular, teachers paid for administrative duties), because the highest paid district has nearly every teacher at the top of its pay school if its average pay does not include supplementals.
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:08 PM
 
Location: St Louis, MO
4,677 posts, read 5,787,366 times
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Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
The various school districts in CA represented by the CTA should start firing the poor teachers and free up those positions to people who can get the job done. CA gets an "F" for policies to get rid of bad teachers by the National Council for Teacher Quality.

Change the CA law requiring 40% of the state budget to be spent on education.

Finally, give up some of the pensions and/or up personal contributions. Times are tough. Something has to give.
Or, give up Prop 13 and solve teacher pay, school district budgets, and the state budget in one fell swoop.
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:29 AM
 
17,183 posts, read 23,001,286 times
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Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
You missed the very serious flaw in the Bee's data:
"Roughly 15 percent of districts -- most of them very small -- did not report 2011 teacher pay data to the state."
That pretty much means they remove all the salaries below the 1st standard deviation. That makes for a huge shift in mean or median salary (not clear which they are using).

I also wonder if they are including supplementals (in particular, teachers paid for administrative duties), because the highest paid district has nearly every teacher at the top of its pay school if its average pay does not include supplementals.
Which is also why state averages are not very useful in figuring this out.
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:53 AM
 
8,231 posts, read 17,353,078 times
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Originally Posted by psr13 View Post
Well, the state doesn't have any money. It has spent way, way too much money for far too long.
Coming to a state near you, and the federal government as well.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,714 posts, read 31,259,789 times
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Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
Or, give up Prop 13 and solve teacher pay, school district budgets, and the state budget in one fell swoop.
CA should phase out Prop 13. They should bust or dramatically weaken the CTA too. Let that property tax stay in the local areas instead of letting the state legislators play with it. Oh - and get rid of Proposition 98 too.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,714 posts, read 31,259,789 times
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Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Which is also why state averages are not very useful in figuring this out.
Very small school districts employ relatively few teachers. So their data probably is not nearly as important as capturing the data from LA, SF, SD, Bay Area, etc.

Do you think the average teacher in California earns $45K?
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Old 07-25-2012, 06:57 PM
 
32,516 posts, read 37,285,299 times
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Originally Posted by marigolds6 View Post
Or, give up Prop 13
That is not going to happen anytime soon.

The Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association is too powerful. (Pro- Prop 13 taxpayer's group.)
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