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Old 07-29-2012, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,928,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm not sure the answers to all those questions are particularly relevant, especially the bold. "Civics" is more than memorizing little factoids for trivial pursuit.
I was responding to the OP, which made no reference to Civics.
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Old 07-30-2012, 06:35 PM
 
17,183 posts, read 22,898,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I had some "new math" in college. A friend had some in a university run HS in Illinois. A criticism I heard about "new math" is that it wasn't interpreted, e.g. taught properly. I don't know. I'm not a math expert.
This is true. The problems with the *new math* were not with the actual math, but with the fact that the people who introduced it did not allow enough time to train teachers to teach it properly. It was mathematically sound, but very badly executed in textbooks and by teachers.

Don’t Become a Casualty of the Math Wars
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Old 07-30-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Middle America
37,409 posts, read 53,543,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I learned almost everything I know about Canada from when I was a big hockey fan. Seriously, I knew the junior teams and the pro teams. Looked them up on maps. Was in touch with 2 players families in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Went to see games in Toronto. Went to Quebec. It made me interested in finding out as much as I could about Canada. I can even sing their anthem.
As a kid who grew up in Buffalo and a hockey fan, trips to Toronto often, my boyfriend could probably pass a Canadian citizenship test.
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:49 AM
 
3,244 posts, read 7,445,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Are people really annoyed by others' knowledge? How sad for them.

I would say that many are annoyed by the lack of knowledge. See it every day.
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:50 AM
 
3,244 posts, read 7,445,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
As a kid who grew up in Buffalo and a hockey fan, trips to Toronto often, my boyfriend could probably pass a Canadian citizenship test.
Just joking, but there is only one question on the test. "Can you say 'Eh?' "
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:51 AM
 
2,603 posts, read 5,017,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm not sure the answers to all those questions are particularly relevant, especially the bold. "Civics" is more than memorizing little factoids for trivial pursuit.
I would think the percentage voting for Washington as less important than when we put God on our money.

The problem is, the ridiculous tests ask kids to regurgitate the year that something happened, rather than the significance of it. I would rather our kids take away the fact that we added "God" to a lot of patriotic symbols sometime in the 1950s to distinguish ourselves from Communists rather than simply "we put God on our money in 1957."
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Old 07-31-2012, 02:48 PM
 
17,183 posts, read 22,898,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coped View Post
I would think the percentage voting for Washington as less important than when we put God on our money.

The problem is, the ridiculous tests ask kids to regurgitate the year that something happened, rather than the significance of it. I would rather our kids take away the fact that we added "God" to a lot of patriotic symbols sometime in the 1950s to distinguish ourselves from Communists rather than simply "we put God on our money in 1957."
I agree that the significance is more important than the dates, but... what you say above is only half-true. You are thinking of the under God in the Pledge of Allegiance and that was in 1954, not 1957. What is ironic is that the people who insist that the pledge should be recited in school seem to have no idea that it was written by a socialist. He actually wanted to use *equality* in the pledge from the French Revolutionary phrase, but knew that superintendents of education were against equality for women and blacks at the time.

The motto was placed on our coins in 1864. The appeal by clergy began in 1861 and had to do with increased religious sentiment during the civil war. It was not placed on paper money until 1964.

History of 'In God We Trust'

The flag:
The Pledge of Allegiance - A Short History
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Old 07-31-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,928,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coped View Post
I would think the percentage voting for Washington as less important than when we put God on our money.

The problem is, the ridiculous tests ask kids to regurgitate the year that something happened, rather than the significance of it. I would rather our kids take away the fact that we added "God" to a lot of patriotic symbols sometime in the 1950s to distinguish ourselves from Communists rather than simply "we put God on our money in 1957."
To a kid who thinks God was there since 1776, the year it was put there is is more meaningful than the significance of it. Significant is the fact that the Founding Fathers never thought it needed to be there, and even tried to keep it off, with the First Amendment.
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Old 07-31-2012, 04:16 PM
 
2,612 posts, read 5,583,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
This is true. The problems with the *new math* were not with the actual math, but with the fact that the people who introduced it did not allow enough time to train teachers to teach it properly. It was mathematically sound, but very badly executed in textbooks and by teachers.

Don’t Become a Casualty of the Math Wars
In my experience, that's true of nearly every teaching reform to come down the line in the last 30 years.
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Old 07-31-2012, 04:21 PM
 
2,612 posts, read 5,583,639 times
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Kids don't learn anything of significance because they are too busy memorizing a plethora of trivia. Instead of learning who George Washington is, they have to memorize names and dates of not just a few, but about 30 dead guys that most of us have never heard of. The important stuff gets lost in all that trivia. Honestly, I don't know who John Cabbot is and I'm pretty sure I can live the rest of my life well without knowing, but it is a test question on a standardized test given every year. Also, they only study American history for one or two years max - the other years are spent learning completely useless drivel like memorizing the names of every indian (native american) tribe that lived in this state and what they ate. An entire year is spent studying a small country in African that no one has every heard of other than the third graders that spend a year studying the habits, government, architecture, and other useless stuff about this tiny and completely insignificant country. Quite a bit of time is also spent memorizing the name of all the Egyptian gods. Important stuff, that. I mean, who cares about the house and senate when there are ancient gods who looked like giant birds.Somewhere in all of that there are important ideas hidden, but the ideas are not taught, just the trivia, because that's what's on the test, and anyway, even without the test most teachers don't really understand the study of history beyond memorization of facts.
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