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Old 07-31-2012, 10:58 PM
 
14,725 posts, read 33,357,750 times
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Well, I'm not THAT bad, but I remember getting a not-so-hot mid-term grade in HS Civics. Why? It was boring. As a 15 year old, I had fully absorbed the fact that politicians were and are slime, so I couldn't be interested in a semester worth of that crap.

However, I did well in my history courses, be it in HS or college.
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:03 AM
 
3,393 posts, read 5,276,530 times
Reputation: 3031
Quote:
Originally Posted by 313Weather View Post
These are the results of a telephone survey back in 2009. The percentages show how many students provided the correct answer. This is scary...

75 Percent of Oklahoma Students Can't Name the First President - News9.com - Oklahoma City, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports |
Nowadays, I don't think people have the brain power. I'm not sure it fits in their world, either, as technology does all the thinking for people. Handwriting is almost extinct too but, young people are ok with being illiterate, as they can print and don't need handwriting to earn bling.
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Old 08-01-2012, 01:08 PM
 
2,603 posts, read 5,017,960 times
Reputation: 1959
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
To a kid who thinks God was there since 1776, the year it was put there is is more meaningful than the significance of it. Significant is the fact that the Founding Fathers never thought it needed to be there, and even tried to keep it off, with the First Amendment.
I think you're exactly right. But I think to a young kid, 1957 is just as exotic as 1776. When we focus on the dates for the test, it simply become "a long time ago."
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:10 AM
 
919 posts, read 1,689,808 times
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In my opinion these questions don't accurately test or measure a students knowledge of history. Not knowing how many years you elect a senator for will be lead to repeating some international crisis. These are merely trivia questions like the sort youd see on like jeopardy. What they should've asked questions about the importance of the declaration of independence, why the 3 branches of gov't were created, etc.

I'm an A student in AP US History and there are questions in the OP I can't answer like the senator question; but I can go on for hours about the civil war, the revolutionary way, the great depression, the roaring 20's, the Eisenhower era, the Cuban Missle Crisis, the holocaust, the watergate scandal, etc. these things in my opinion; are more important than knowing someo the above questions.
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Old 08-05-2012, 03:31 PM
 
Location: NJ
1,495 posts, read 5,044,766 times
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My husband knows the answers to all those questions the OP posted and he's British and has only been in the US a few years !


I'm a teacher for younger children and it's scary to see how much knowledge and skills children are lacking today
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Old 08-05-2012, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,694,120 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzii View Post
In my opinion these questions don't accurately test or measure a students knowledge of history. Not knowing how many years you elect a senator for will be lead to repeating some international crisis. These are merely trivia questions like the sort youd see on like jeopardy. What they should've asked questions about the importance of the declaration of independence, why the 3 branches of gov't were created, etc.

I'm an A student in AP US History and there are questions in the OP I can't answer like the senator question; but I can go on for hours about the civil war, the revolutionary way, the great depression, the roaring 20's, the Eisenhower era, the Cuban Missle Crisis, the holocaust, the watergate scandal, etc. these things in my opinion; are more important than knowing someo the above questions.
While I disagree with you about the senate term issue (I happen to think that's important to know), I agree with the rest of your post. Many of those original questions are more or less "trivia questions". It is rather shocking (if true) that most don't know who the first president was.
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Old 08-05-2012, 04:23 PM
 
919 posts, read 1,689,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
While I disagree with you about the senate term issue (I happen to think that's important to know), I agree with the rest of your post. Many of those original questions are more or less "trivia questions". It is rather shocking (if true) that most don't know who the first president was.

Lol, maybe at some point I will know. But again I am only in H.S... Maybe when I start voting

and yeah I don't know how many people (realistically) could not know the first president
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Old 08-05-2012, 04:55 PM
 
1,034 posts, read 1,798,510 times
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My 18 year old son was taught very little American history in school, but he had several years worth of classes about the Pacific rim countries, especially Japan.
A student from Australia a few years older than he said she had been taught a great deal about the US in school.

Don't feel too bad though, fellow Americans. A while ago I read an article published in a British newspaper about British schoolkids' appalling lack of knowledge of history.

Here are a couple of articles to make us poor ignorant Americans feel just a tad better. At least we're not the only ones in an apparently sinking boat.



Study shows England

‘Spoon-fed’ students given tuition in basic skills at university - Telegraph
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Old 08-07-2012, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Nesconset, NY
2,202 posts, read 4,325,639 times
Reputation: 2159
What is the supreme law of the land? 28 percent
Most people get this wrong by saying "the U.S. Constitution". It's actually all those laws and agreements established by Article VI, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution: "This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding."

What do we call the first ten amendments to the Constitution? 26 percent

What are the two parts of the U.S. Congress? 27 percent

How many justices are there on the Supreme Court? 10 percent

Who wrote the Declaration of Independence? 14 percent
Most get this wrong by saying "Thomas Jefferson". It is generally agreed Jefferson wrote the first draft which the 'declaration committee' then reworked. The 'declaration committee' consisted of members of the Continental Congress: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Robert R. Livingston, and Roger Sherman. After the committee completed their draft it was presented to the full Continental Congress for further revision. The most correct answer would be: "The Continental Congress".

What ocean is on the east coast of the United States? 61 percent

What are the two major political parties in the United States? 43 percent

We elect a U.S. senator for how many years? 11 percent

Who was the first President of the United States? 23 percent
Most get this wrong by saying: "George Washington (President 1788-1797)". George Washington was the first President under the U.S. Constitution, however, the Articles of Confederation established the colonies as independent of Great Britain in 1781. Under the Articles of Confederation John Hanson was elected President that same year. There were six other 1yr. Presidents under the Articles of Confederation. So, technically, George Washington is the 7th. President.

Who is in charge of the executive branch? 29 percent
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,928,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIGuy1202 View Post

Who was the first President of the United States? 23 percent
Most get this wrong by saying: "George Washington (President 1788-1797)". George Washington was the first President under the U.S. Constitution, however, the Articles of Confederation established the colonies as independent of Great Britain in 1781. Under the Articles of Confederation John Hanson was elected President that same year. There were six other 1yr. Presidents under the Articles of Confederation. So, technically, George Washington is the 7th. President.

None of the presidents before Washington could correctly be called "president of the United States". They were the presiding officers of the Continental Congress, and as such, were closer to being Speaker of the House. While there was a Continental Congress, there was not yet a United States, of which one could be president, nor was there an executive branch, which would have been the office of the president. The Executive Branch , and therefore the office of President of the United States, was created with the Constitution of 1787.

Last edited by jtur88; 08-07-2012 at 09:57 PM..
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