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Old 10-17-2012, 01:31 PM
 
624 posts, read 1,247,079 times
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Work for a high performing school.
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:20 PM
 
3,281 posts, read 6,274,498 times
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Originally Posted by lvoc View Post
From what appears that is pretty much what we do. Bad teachers with tenure become permanent. Great but junior teachers get laid off.
No teacher is ever "permanent." Tenure simply ensures due process for those that have experience and have proven themselves. If an administrator wants to get rid of a bad teacher, it can be done. The fact that there are bad teachers that still have jobs is the fault of poor administration, not the system itself.

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Originally Posted by lvoc View Post
And then we have charters where those who won't deal with the system demonstrate they can do less well for more money..
No, what charters demonstrate is that when the brightest urban students from the most motivated families are cherry-picked from their normal public schools, they occasionally (but not always) score higher on standardized tests. As for the money part of the equation, it should be noted that charters also take in disabled students at a lower rate than regular public schools, which also keeps costs down. Don't be fooled, most charters are doing nothing different or special to improve outcomes besides gaming the system (and lining the pockets of the corporate management companies).
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:56 PM
 
Location: San Diego
990 posts, read 938,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffpv View Post
How do you think teachers should be evaluated?

High-stakes test scores? Too many variables unrelated to teacher performance.
Percentage of students passing? Again, too many variables, and besides teachers would have a tangible reason to inflate grades.
Observations? Not enough time (in most schools) for administrators to effectively evaluate all teachers.
Student feedback? Not a good idea for many obvious reasons.

Any combination of the above?
None of the above?

Obviously the buzzword is accountability. However, how can accountability fairly be defined for both teachers and the district?

I despise high-stakes examinations for a number of reasons, one of those reasons being that I have yet to see a high-stakes examination which is truly holistic. Therefore, I would like to see such examinations eliminated all together; therefore I surely wouldn't use them to evaluate teacher performance.

In my opinion, a synthesis of highly individualized student 'action plans' (formulated after students have been in classes a certain time; say, a month) and ongoing assessment would be an effective method of analyzing student achievement; I would tie these results in with teacher performance. This, combined with administrative/peer observations, teacher participation in professional training, and teacher activity in the 'life' of the school would constitute the evaluation of educators.

At least that's my 2 cents. Thoughts or suggestions?
I'm a founder and board member of a high-achieving charter school here in San Diego. We were founded on the idea that teachers must be held accountable for the progress of their students. We use the STAR testing in order to measure the progress of the students. We test at the beginning and end of the academic year and use that to determine if the teachers are really doing a good job. The school has been incredibly successful and our massive waiting list (unlike most Charter schools) is a pretty clear indicator of the value of holding teachers accountable for their success. We don't measure raw scores, but rather the improvement in each individual student.

We knew using STAR was a good idea when the teacher's unions were fighting us during the implementation process. In the end, we were able to obtain some wonderful teachers because they were the ones willing to take the risk of being truly reviewed on their performance.
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Old 10-18-2012, 03:57 PM
 
570 posts, read 1,729,503 times
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Originally Posted by Marty3d View Post
Or, measure teacher performance by tested student growth in the subject - compared to other students who are tested in the same subject at other schools and begin the class with a similar test history.

There are still a large batch of variables, some of which the teacher cannot control, but it is results driven and contains less subjectivity.
teacher performance shouldn't not based on the student's test score at all. I would want to teach mostly Asian students if that's the case.
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Old 10-18-2012, 07:15 PM
 
2,042 posts, read 2,903,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkBeforeYouVote View Post
I'm a founder and board member of a high-achieving charter school here in San Diego. We were founded on the idea that teachers must be held accountable for the progress of their students. We use the STAR testing in order to measure the progress of the students. We test at the beginning and end of the academic year and use that to determine if the teachers are really doing a good job. The school has been incredibly successful and our massive waiting list (unlike most Charter schools) is a pretty clear indicator of the value of holding teachers accountable for their success. We don't measure raw scores, but rather the improvement in each individual student.

We knew using STAR was a good idea when the teacher's unions were fighting us during the implementation process. In the end, we were able to obtain some wonderful teachers because they were the ones willing to take the risk of being truly reviewed on their performance.
That sounds like a fabulous teaching environment. I have a question: Do all your teachers have/need a teaching license? I ask because I have heard some charters don't require one.
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Old 10-18-2012, 07:23 PM
 
861 posts, read 1,249,352 times
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Teacher's have a required curriculum. Independent testing of the students should play a signifigant role in determining a teacher's abilities/success/competence. Teachers grade students. Teachers should also be graded- and flunked if necessary. And they should not be protected by unions. If this is not a option, parents should be given the option of vouchers. There should be zero tolerance for incompetent teachers.
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Old 10-18-2012, 08:30 PM
 
12,973 posts, read 15,796,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkBeforeYouVote View Post
I'm a founder and board member of a high-achieving charter school here in San Diego. We were founded on the idea that teachers must be held accountable for the progress of their students. We use the STAR testing in order to measure the progress of the students. We test at the beginning and end of the academic year and use that to determine if the teachers are really doing a good job. The school has been incredibly successful and our massive waiting list (unlike most Charter schools) is a pretty clear indicator of the value of holding teachers accountable for their success. We don't measure raw scores, but rather the improvement in each individual student.

We knew using STAR was a good idea when the teacher's unions were fighting us during the implementation process. In the end, we were able to obtain some wonderful teachers because they were the ones willing to take the risk of being truly reviewed on their performance.
You are the classic problem with charter schools. You have large waiting lists. What happens to the kids whose parents don't put them on the waiting list?

I don't like charters when we get into the private school government funded as you appear to have.

Our most interesting local charter is located in a bad area, provides priority placement to those nearby but still requires action by the parent. That in and of itself tends to remove the bottom students.

What are the demographic number for your charter? Average income? Two parent homes? Bad area? Priority to local kids?
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Old 10-18-2012, 09:32 PM
 
3,281 posts, read 6,274,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lvoc View Post
You are the classic problem with charter schools. You have large waiting lists. What happens to the kids whose parents don't put them on the waiting list?

I don't like charters when we get into the private school government funded as you appear to have.

Our most interesting local charter is located in a bad area, provides priority placement to those nearby but still requires action by the parent. That in and of itself tends to remove the bottom students.

What are the demographic number for your charter? Average income? Two parent homes? Bad area? Priority to local kids?
Excellent points. Let's see these great charter management organizations and groups improve the educational outcomes of students that haven't been cherry-picked or self-selected from them public schools.

Few will argue against accountability, but it's needs to be done fairly. Any accountability system that relies heavily on standardized tests (with their numerous variables involved) is an accountability system that almost certainly isn't going to be very accurate in determining the best and (perhaps most importantly) worst teachers. If you want the best teachers in the toughest environments, you better find a way to judge them fairly or those that can will go teach in areas where they aren't going to be shafted based on factors beyond their control.

And if you're advocating for the elimination of teacher's unions, there better be an organization or set in stone standards that are there to replace the unions to ensure that teaching remains a career and a profession and not just a job. I'm thinking of something like what doctors and lawyers have in the AMA and ABA, respectively.
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Old 04-30-2013, 02:24 PM
 
1,882 posts, read 3,109,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkBeforeYouVote View Post
I'm a founder and board member of a high-achieving charter school here in San Diego. We were founded on the idea that teachers must be held accountable for the progress of their students. We use the STAR testing in order to measure the progress of the students. We test at the beginning and end of the academic year and use that to determine if the teachers are really doing a good job. The school has been incredibly successful and our massive waiting list (unlike most Charter schools) is a pretty clear indicator of the value of holding teachers accountable for their success. We don't measure raw scores, but rather the improvement in each individual student.

We knew using STAR was a good idea when the teacher's unions were fighting us during the implementation process. In the end, we were able to obtain some wonderful teachers because they were the ones willing to take the risk of being truly reviewed on their performance.
How many years teaching experience did you have before founding the charter school? Was your teaching experience at a Title I school? I'll thank my lucky stars if I get a response!
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Old 04-30-2013, 05:22 PM
 
6,292 posts, read 10,594,265 times
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40% of my evaluation is high stakes testing. I teach students with ASD who are self contained most of the day. I'm also at one of the lowest socioeconomic schools in my district. How is this fair to me? All of my students have made progress, but the state tests......... How will special education teachers compete?
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