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Old 06-23-2013, 12:28 PM
 
9,255 posts, read 9,682,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Anson View Post
Nay goode Bettafish. While such books might be read, teaching students how not to spell would not be conducive to good communication skills. They now teach textese. Ltr, m8.
But there are always nerds? lol
Even today quite a few Americans study Latin and Geek. Old or Middle English should be interesting too.
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Old 06-23-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Chaucer is more middle english, after the shift from using implied meaning over standard placement of words occured. Highschool classes have to read some of it. Also Shakespeare.

My mom had a book of English poetry, and I loved that book. It went back to early Anglo-saxon Old English with the germanic rules in place and I managed to learn how to read it so call me a nerd proudly. The interesting thing is later I took German, and the odd way words are placed in a sentence didn't seem unfamiliar to me, and I realized the word endings from the poems had specific meanings.

Sadly, too many kids today can't quite manage standard english and don't want to hear about writing or grammar, unless its text talk.
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Old 06-23-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
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I remember as a kid I learned how to drink Old English.
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Old 06-23-2013, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
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We didn't learn it in the sense that we were conversant in it, but when I was in high school, we were taught Chaucer as-is.
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Old 06-23-2013, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I had to read The Canterbury Tales and Beowulf in both high school (college prep) and undergrad (English major). I also took Latin in college.
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Old 06-23-2013, 04:26 PM
 
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I never did.
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Old 06-23-2013, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
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This only really happens when reading older books as well as Shakespeare poems and plays.
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Old 06-23-2013, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,744 posts, read 4,208,130 times
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Old English is not anything like Chaucer and certainly not like Shakespeare.
I don't know why non English majors eschew it. I didn't.

But then I also elected to take Mandarin. And I was not an Asian Studies or Chinese major either.
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Old 06-24-2013, 04:44 AM
 
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Chaucer and Beowulf - but high school students certainly aren't expected to understand it without footnotes and lots of explanation. No attempt is made to explain the conventions or what exactly has changed.
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Old 06-24-2013, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Ridley Park, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rohirette View Post
Chaucer and Beowulf - but high school students certainly aren't expected to understand it without footnotes and lots of explanation. No attempt is made to explain the conventions or what exactly has changed.
Beowulf isn't taught in Old English though, it's taught in translation. OE is, for all extents and purposes, another language. I took a course in OE in grad school. Knowing German was a big help of course, but it was different enough that it was challenging.

Most students used to (it's been a while since I was in school and I don't have kids) learn some Chaucer. I think it's helpful to understand where the language came from and how it developed. In addition, it can build vocabulary. And even STEM people need to be able to communicate. This idea that we should be raising a bunch of culturally-illiterate cretins to build and invent stuff without the slightest knowledge of history, ethics, or culture is sad.
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