Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-13-2014, 12:53 AM
 
194 posts, read 298,203 times
Reputation: 252

Advertisements

If enrolment in science classes are dropping

We all know what needs to be done to get it back up


MORE EXPLOSIONS

And those enrollments will shoot up like a rocket
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-13-2014, 12:54 AM
 
24,488 posts, read 40,988,056 times
Reputation: 12919
More and more people are studying Clandestine chemistry than ever before.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2014, 02:33 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,386 posts, read 35,401,063 times
Reputation: 14692
More explosions like this?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/04/ny...ning.html?_r=0

Why do people say that more explosions would get more kids to take science classes. Explosions are dangerous. One of the reasons the kids like the other chemistry teacher better than me is that I don't take crazy chances like he does. We both did a demo that has a tendency to boil over the other day. I did it using my overhead projector to show the kids what was happening. He went into the middle of the room with all the kids huddled around a bubbling beaker with not a pair of safety glasses in sight to show them the demo. But he's the fun teacher.

The demo in question in the article is actually one of the favorites. I've always done it on the back bench and have the kids stand on the other side of the room. Most of the accidents I've heard of involved adding more methanol when the kids say "Do it again". So how are we supposed to give kids "more explosions" and keep them safe? We're damned if we do and damned if we don't. If we do take risks, and someone gets hurt, it's our fault. If we don't, we're boring and it's our fault kids don't want to take STEM classes.

This is why I want to teach math. No one expects you to blow anything up in math class...and no one thinks you know how to make meth either.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 02-13-2014 at 02:48 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2014, 08:01 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,594 posts, read 1,400,252 times
Reputation: 970
No safety glasses? Idiot!

I got sick from a chlorine gas experiment in high school. I have asthma.

Tablet computers could be useful for simulations so students can practice experiments ahead of time.

psik
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2014, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes FL and NH.
4,476 posts, read 6,729,813 times
Reputation: 5883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
More explosions like this?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/04/ny...ning.html?_r=0

Why do people say that more explosions would get more kids to take science classes. Explosions are dangerous. One of the reasons the kids like the other chemistry teacher better than me is that I don't take crazy chances like he does. We both did a demo that has a tendency to boil over the other day. I did it using my overhead projector to show the kids what was happening. He went into the middle of the room with all the kids huddled around a bubbling beaker with not a pair of safety glasses in sight to show them the demo. But he's the fun teacher.

The demo in question in the article is actually one of the favorites. I've always done it on the back bench and have the kids stand on the other side of the room. Most of the accidents I've heard of involved adding more methanol when the kids say "Do it again". So how are we supposed to give kids "more explosions" and keep them safe? We're damned if we do and damned if we don't. If we do take risks, and someone gets hurt, it's our fault. If we don't, we're boring and it's our fault kids don't want to take STEM classes.

This is why I want to teach math. No one expects you to blow anything up in math class...and no one thinks you know how to make meth either.
The same challenges exist in math. Why can't we do more fun stuff is a common complaint by many math students. The math curriculum is core-aligned and filled with "real-life" scenarios however, many of the students do not see it as their view of a "real life" that they experience or are interested in. Perhaps it's different in the honors/AP level high school classes, but I expect that you will experience similar frustrations in your general college prep classes that you are experiencing now in science.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2014, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,386 posts, read 35,401,063 times
Reputation: 14692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
The same challenges exist in math. Why can't we do more fun stuff is a common complaint by many math students. The math curriculum is core-aligned and filled with "real-life" scenarios however, many of the students do not see it as their view of a "real life" that they experience or are interested in. Perhaps it's different in the honors/AP level high school classes, but I expect that you will experience similar frustrations in your general college prep classes that you are experiencing now in science.
I teach both math and science. No one is disappointed when I don't blow something up in math class.

Seriously, I will be asked at least a dozen times on the first day of school "When do we get to blow something up?". Kids are disappointed when I tell them they don't get to blow anything up in my class. Because of all the accidents with the rainbow demo, that one is now cut from my list of demos. I normally do it on the first day because it's cool but I won't be doing it anymore.

Kids like exciting demos and they're usually the dangerous ones. My chemistry teacher did the thermite demo on the first day of class when I was in high school. The experiment burned through his table top. We all thought that was cool.

I'm running out of demos that are safe that the kids like and that don't take six hours to set up or aren't too expensive. If they'd give me a $2000 budget, I'd to all kinds of demos. Unfortunately, I get $100/class and that barely covers what I do now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2014, 02:04 PM
 
14,304 posts, read 14,103,544 times
Reputation: 45436
Quote:
Originally Posted by blacktothefuture View Post
If enrolment in science classes are dropping

We all know what needs to be done to get it back up


MORE EXPLOSIONS

And those enrollments will shoot up like a rocket
I've had more than one claim against a school district for a science experiment that injured a student.

They can be done and I don't discourage schools from doing them. However, its highly irresponsible to talk about explosions the way you are here. Explosions often produce glass shards that blind an eye or seriously damage it.

These kinds of things need to be carefully thought through and when experiments are done, the kids need to be wearing safety glasses and standing a safe distance away from the chemicals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2014, 02:42 PM
 
20,793 posts, read 61,081,847 times
Reputation: 10691
Our kids chem teacher had a pyrotechnic license...they had fun!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,386 posts, read 35,401,063 times
Reputation: 14692
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
I've had more than one claim against a school district for a science experiment that injured a student.

They can be done and I don't discourage schools from doing them. However, its highly irresponsible to talk about explosions the way you are here. Explosions often produce glass shards that blind an eye or seriously damage it.

These kinds of things need to be carefully thought through and when experiments are done, the kids need to be wearing safety glasses and standing a safe distance away from the chemicals.
Safety has to come first. And that means that my students don't get to do explosions and I rarely do them. I do do the exploding pumpkin just for the coolness factor and I've been known to blow up balloons filled with hydrogen but that's about the extent of my blowing up things.

unfortunately the cost of equipment like blast shields results in us just not doing some of the more interesting demos. I wouldn't dream of doing thermite without a blast shield but I don't have $300 in my budget to buy one so I'm not doing thermite. (I don't have the budget for thermite for 6 classes either).

And something teachers should realize is that when there is a lawsuit, it will be against them as well as the school district because the teacher is the professional who picks the labs and demos. If they fail to keep students safe, they can be held personally liable.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 02-16-2014 at 03:01 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,386 posts, read 35,401,063 times
Reputation: 14692
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
Our kids chem teacher had a pyrotechnic license...they had fun!

That doesn't make it legal for him to show students how to blow things up.

I had an interesting conversation with a police officer on the bomb squad last year about what teachers can and cannot do and blowing things up is one of them. He questioned the exploding pumpkin but conceded that it was ok because I wasn't doing an explosion inside a sealed container (the pumpkin is carved and the pieces just fly out when you ignite the gas inside the pumpkin).

It would be illegal for any chemistry teacher, pyrotechnic license or not, to do something like put dry ice in a bottle and cap the bottle to show how it blows up. That is considered a bomb. It would also be illegal to teach kids how to blow something up. For this reason I cannot tell my students what chemicals I use for the exploding pumpkin. I cannot assist my students in bomb making in any way and that includes telling them which chemicals to mix to make flammable gasses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top