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Old 03-12-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Gettysburg, PA
1,751 posts, read 1,777,908 times
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Awesome! Without knowing cursive I would never have been able to do the research I have done on my beloved subject, D.H. Hill. Without that knowledge, the Lord would not have been able to use that as a tool to convert me! So happy to see the return of this skill though, while it may not be useful in a large sense, it can definitely be more than a help to certain people--it can turn into something they would need to know so they can do something they love!
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Old 03-12-2017, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,744 posts, read 9,641,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Cursive makes a comeback - CBS News

It's about time.

Interesting article about cursive making a comeback.

Thoughts.
Cursive, as opposed to...texting over cell phone. When cell phones can translate spoken words into text, and then, on the other end, reconvert the text into spoken words, reading and writing will no longer be required for humans to function normally.

Won't that be wonderful?
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Old 03-12-2017, 02:50 PM
 
8,641 posts, read 3,997,303 times
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Writing in longhand is much much faster than printing, although slower than a really good typist. I am not actually sure if there are any good typists anymore (as opposed to people who use computer keyboards with lots of "backspace" (which is me)).


Also in my experience when you are rushing, rushed longhand is more legible than rushed printing. I watch my younger colleagues trying to laboriously print a simple two sentence note and I am glad I learned how to write longhand - although my penmanship is not all that great.


In a meeting when there's a simple calculation question and I multiply or divide sizable numbers by hand, their eyes bug out and they stare at me like I had two heads or something. "Long division - what's that???"
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Old 03-12-2017, 02:57 PM
 
Location: SC
8,795 posts, read 6,331,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
People still need to sign documents using cursive and it is useful to be able to read older documents written in cursive. I seem to remember also reading that writing by hand helps memorize when studying more than typing on a computer.
Not really. The only requirement of a signature is that it be distinct and show intent.
http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/signature

As for developing brains...

As if there were no other ways to "develop" a brain. Hell, playing a pinball machine probably enhances physical development more and is more fun. To claim that something is important because it does something that other things do better is just nonsense.

Last edited by blktoptrvl; 03-12-2017 at 03:05 PM..
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Old 03-12-2017, 04:13 PM
 
646 posts, read 380,199 times
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Glad to see it coming back.

To me, being able to write cursive is just a basic life-skill for any educated person. My kids will learn it; if not in school, I will take the time to teach them myself. There's absolutely no compromise for me on this.
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Old 03-12-2017, 10:19 PM
 
16,833 posts, read 15,132,717 times
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The first link, states cursive but if you click their links to "the research" it does not differentiate between cursive and any other type of handwriting.

The next three are blog posts based on opinion and not research. Indeed the first one from psychology today even states that there is no difference between cursive and other forms of handwriting.
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Old 03-12-2017, 10:20 PM
 
16,833 posts, read 15,132,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodburyWoody View Post
A few reasons.

The goal is to communicate. To as broad an audience as possible. More people are able to read printed lettering than shorthand. But shorthand is quicker and more efficient than printing for most people.

Cursive is a sweet spot in the middle - efficient for the writer and widely readable by the general population.

Why not just type, which is readable by even more and I would guess much faster for most to both produce and read?

Fine in some/many situations. But there is study out which shows handwriting notes supports learning better than typing notes:

Taking Notes By Hand May Be Better Than Digitally, Researchers Say : NPR

For the student who knows shorthand, that would be perfect for their own use.
I handwrite faster than most people can write cursive. And the link does not say taking notes by cursive, just by writing by hand. Again, why does it need to be cursive?
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Old 03-12-2017, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
10,765 posts, read 3,880,540 times
Reputation: 16061
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Cursive makes a comeback - CBS News

It's about time.

Interesting article about cursive making a comeback.

Thoughts.
It takes a lot more work to use handwriting, than typing on a keyboard. So you put more thought into your words, before you invest the effort of recording them. Not nearly so many words are used, so you become more concise with handwriting, which operates on a tighter budget.
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Old 03-13-2017, 07:15 AM
 
34,994 posts, read 35,520,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Writing in longhand is much much faster than printing, although slower than a really good typist. I am not actually sure if there are any good typists anymore (as opposed to people who use computer keyboards with lots of "backspace" (which is me)).

Being that I was a good typist years ago, I definitely agree writing in longhand (particularly cursive) is much easier and faster than typing.

Here is an article about the benefits of cursive behind just writing:
The Benefits of Cursive Go Beyond Writing - NYTimes.com
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Old 03-13-2017, 08:19 AM
 
1,868 posts, read 1,206,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I handwrite faster than most people can write cursive. And the link does not say taking notes by cursive, just by writing by hand. Again, why does it need to be cursive?
You are an outlier. Most people do not print faster than they write in cursive or shorthand, which is part of why both were developed.

Where did I state note taking needs to be in cursive? If you re-read what I wrote, it supported shorthand or whatever works best for the student who will be using the notes.

Both printing and cursive are (or were) widely-readable. Usually, that is a goal in writing.

I can read the cursive hand writing of my grandfather, a colleague from London or the sidewalk sign written by someone in Manhattan. Even with variations. Just like printing. But for most people, hand writing in a script is quicker and more efficient.
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