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Old 05-14-2017, 03:21 PM
 
Location: East Coast
4,235 posts, read 3,673,353 times
Reputation: 6458

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post

Your attitude towards parents (they send them to K because it's free) is troubling as well. It is known that "red-shirting" occurs more in affluent kids whose parents can afford another year of pre-school, however.
This has been shown to be the case, though. In wealthier school districts, redshirting is more common. In addition, anecdotally, one of my neighbors specifically wanted to send her kid early and had to fight to get the school to agree (his birthday was late September and the cutoff was 9/1 -- they said he could start first grade if she sent him to a state accredited private kindergarten program) specifically because she did not want to pay for aftercare. (K was half day.) Yes, she had to pay for the private K, but she was already paying for him to be full time in daycare, so she switched him to another program that had an accredited K so that she would not have to pay for the more expensive after K programs.) So, absolutely there are parents who want to send their kids to K programs earlier because they are free

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
When anyone is a year behind, people assume that he is stupid and was refused promotion.. It will follow him the rest of his life.
This is one of the dumbest things I've ever read on C-D. And I've read plenty of dumb things. Of course it won't. Unless the kid is a full year or more older than everyone in the class, no one will even give it a second thought. And even if it were the case the kid was more than a year older than everyone not many people will give it much thought.

 
Old 05-14-2017, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,583 posts, read 6,666,986 times
Reputation: 14786
Every child is different and it depends on if he is actually ready for kindergarten or not! If he's not socially and academically ready then hold him back, if he's on par with others his age and is ready then I'd send him. Kindergarten is not like it was 20 or 30 years ago! They get homework everyday and are learning things that I didn't learn till 1st or 2nd grade.

My daughter's birthday is June 22nd. I never thought about hold ing her back and our cut off was 8/30. We have since moved to another state where the cutoff is 8/1. She's in 3rd grade now but I have heard numerous times fro her teacher "Oh she's young, I'm surprised you didn't hold her back a year when starting school". Seems here that even though the cutoff is 8/1, many hold their kids back if their birthdays are after 6/1.

Again, don't worry about how old he will be when he graduates or when he will start work. Worry about if he's ready or not! I would ask the preschool teacher for fact to why she feels he should be held back.
 
Old 05-14-2017, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
11,583 posts, read 6,666,986 times
Reputation: 14786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
When anyone is a year behind, people assume that he is stupid and was refused promotion.. It will follow him the rest of his life.


Not true at all!
 
Old 05-14-2017, 06:27 PM
 
5,401 posts, read 6,465,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leasoap View Post
DS turns 5 on August 5th and the cutoff in our area is September 1st. He should be starting Kindergarten in the fall, but his preschool teachers have been advising me to wait a year. Even though we can financially afford another year of pre-school, I really want to send him on time.

For me, it's long-term, not short-term. Redshirting means that he'll still be in high school when he's 18. It also means that he'll start his career a year later than most people. Yes, I know some people are going to talk about Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers, but as a parent, I feel like it's my duty to teach DS that he doesn't need trophies or to always be the best in order to be happy.

I also want him to fit in and not feel out of place. I can only imagine how awkward it would feel for him to be 6, while some of his classmates are still 4, 7 while some of his classmates are still 5, etc. His classmates might think there's something wrong with him if was a year older than them, and I'd hate for him to have a bad reputation for something that was not his decision, but ours.

Also, I strongly believe that the cutoff dates are there for a reason. If kids born in August kids truly weren't ready to start Kindergarten at 5, the cutoff would be earlier. The people laying the cutoffs have done thorough studies to figure out when kids should start Kindergarten. They know what they're talking about and I feel like it would be arrogant to act as if I knew better.
The old rule of thumb for school attendance is to be at least 6 years 6 months old on the first day of 1st grade. There are many factors contributing to a good educational experience. Emotional & physical maturity are just as important as being academically ready. This might not become a big deal until your child reaches junior high or high school. I would wait.
 
Old 05-14-2017, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Garbage, NC
3,125 posts, read 2,996,554 times
Reputation: 8235
My little brother's birthday is on September 29, and the cut-off (at the time, not sure what it is now) was October 15th. His preschool teacher also suggested that he stay in preschool for another year, but my mom sent him on.

It was a little tough when started kindergarten at 4 years old, and he was a little immature compared to some of his classmates at first. He did fine academically. By about halfway through the kindergarten school year, he had started to settle in nicely. In 1st grade and beyond, he did not have any problems. YMMV, of course.

Good luck. I'm sure he'll be fine either way, really. Go with your gut.
 
Old 05-14-2017, 06:40 PM
 
200 posts, read 173,550 times
Reputation: 1029
As a former kindergarten teacher, I can tell you that the "summer babies" (the ones born in the summer) usually were the ones who struggled because of the lack of maturity, not intellectual capacity. However, this hit to their confidence can stay with them. Summer baby boys usually suffer worse than summer baby girls. Kindergarten is very academic, too academic if you ask me, one of the many reasons I quit teaching. It is a gift to allow your child to be a kid before the stresses of school begin, IMHO. They have the rest of their lives to be worked to death, why rush it?

Do you have any kindergarten readiness screening where you live? Where I live, we screen kids and advise parents of what resources are available to get their kids school-ready. Take the advice of the experts, please. Don't "go with your gut" as so many posters said because you should be listening to the experts (there's America's #1 problem right now, people who think their own ignorance is better or as good as a smart person's knowledge, but that's a rant for another thread...)

Last edited by TurquoiseSky; 05-14-2017 at 06:49 PM..
 
Old 05-14-2017, 06:52 PM
 
200 posts, read 173,550 times
Reputation: 1029
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyrye View Post
Red shirting is a no brainer
Maybe if you don't have a brain and just want free childcare, yeah. But decisions made that will affect the rest of a child's life should involve some thought.
 
Old 05-14-2017, 08:36 PM
 
311 posts, read 443,546 times
Reputation: 627
When my son was young, I did not believe in Pre-K (and still do not believe in the necessity of it). I brought my son to the summer get to know you meeting for starting Kindergarten. The teacher said he must go to pre-K first, but I was adamant that it was not needed. I did not go to Pre-K or even Kindergarten when I was young and neither did most people at the time. We made out just fine.

I made a deal with the teacher that I was to pay her to tutor him after class, if he could not cut it, then I would send him to Pre-K. After a week and a half, she admitted he was fine and would remain with the Kindergarten class. No more tutoring.
 
Old 05-14-2017, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Mid South Central TX
3,216 posts, read 8,516,443 times
Reputation: 2263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
The bold is something I really have a problem with. Now before you say, "I'm a teacher; I know" I will say that I am a now-retired pediatric nurse and know a lot about child development myself. There is a wide age range when kids become "mature" both physically and socially. How you can say that each and every "young" 10 year old is less mature than the others is beyond me.

Your attitude towards parents (they send them to K because it's free) is troubling as well. It is known that "red-shirting" occurs more in affluent kids whose parents can afford another year of pre-school, however.

By 10 the prematurity should not be an issue unless it caused some neurological problems, which it sounds like it might have with the kid you discussed. In that case, he probably needs some special services.
I did NOT say EVERY young child is less mature. I said that is was easy to tell, especially when in a classroom setting.

I don't have a "attitude" towards parents. Those are actual quotes from several of our Kinder parents. It is not all Kinder parents, but several have said that to our Kinder teachers at Kinder Round-Up, as well as to our Principal.

In the case I mentioned, the prematurity is an issue, as he should have been born in October, and would not have made the cutoff. His chronological age made him eligible, but his corrected age would have had him enter a year later.Coupled with the issues that I mentioned he had been having since Kindergarten, makes me worry about his future. He will continue to struggle.
 
Old 05-14-2017, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
10,420 posts, read 14,516,290 times
Reputation: 22015
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeZoo View Post
When my son was young, I did not believe in Pre-K (and still do not believe in the necessity of it). I brought my son to the summer get to know you meeting for starting Kindergarten. The teacher said he must go to pre-K first, but I was adamant that it was not needed. I did not go to Pre-K or even Kindergarten when I was young and neither did most people at the time. We made out just fine.

I made a deal with the teacher that I was to pay her to tutor him after class, if he could not cut it, then I would send him to Pre-K. After a week and a half, she admitted he was fine and would remain with the Kindergarten class. No more tutoring.
I began my education with first grade. I later skipped fifth and seventh grades. I wish that I could have started first grade when I wasn't quite four instead of waiting until I wasn't quite six.
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