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Old 12-15-2019, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
10,336 posts, read 7,920,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Knock on wood, I have never experienced it, but I have heard that the process of being removed is still very stressful and involves time and lawyers. Doesn't seem like much of a consolation of having your name dropped after discovery.
I am a physician, too, and I have been through it. Six months after starting practice, I received slides on a salivary gland resection. I correctly diagnosed a salivary gland cancer, and noted in the diagnosis field of the report that the tumor was present at the surgical margins of the resection. Five years later, I was named in a malpractice suit. It turned out that the surgeon never read my pathology report. It took. 1 1/2 years, multiple visits to my defense attorney’s office, and a deposition (which involved being grilled by the plaintiff’s attorney) before the case against me was dropped. And of course it complicated my license renewals for the next two years after the dismissal.

All in all, I don’t recommend the experience. I’ve had root canals that were more enjoyable.
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Old 12-15-2019, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
10,336 posts, read 7,920,341 times
Reputation: 27706
Quote:
Originally Posted by usayit View Post
One of the podcasts that I listened to years ago stemmed from one the longest running studies of people; Harvard Study of Human Development. It tracked the lives of people for every 80 years.

One of the things that came out of that study was that those that established a level of happiness were more likely to bring successes in life... not the other way around... Happiness didn't always come with success. We have many cases in which very successful people were in pain of depression throughout their lives and committed suicide.

With that said, I will not demand that my children enter any one field. Rather I want them to choose according to their interests that makes them happy while rooting them in the realities of return on investment. Educate them on how their choices lay down the path of their future life financially, emotionally, and personally. Realistically, some choices will offer opportunities and others will not.... but it is important to them to make choices they can live with and of course with guidance from us as parents.
You are a very wise parent!
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Old 12-16-2019, 08:15 AM
 
19,580 posts, read 17,859,815 times
Reputation: 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Sorry for the self quote. It's too late to edit that above post.

I just looked at some numbers to be sure. Average doctor pay (~$210,000) is much higher than average lawyer pay (~$120,000).
Sorry for another self-quote. Average doctor pay is ~$310,00 not $210,000.
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Old 12-16-2019, 08:36 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,374 posts, read 28,445,436 times
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Most aspiring physicians get weeded out in pre-med. I heard that 80% of students never pass inorganic chemistry (or is it organic?).

My degree is in engineering though.
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
16,289 posts, read 32,248,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
My wife demands that one of our kids become a doctor, regardless of their interest. Or I should say she attempts to nurture their interest in this field.

I think this is primarily due to the conventional thinking that doctors are one of the best professions.

Is that conventional thinking still true on the eve of 2020?
I don't know about it being the most coveted goal for a kid. I am thinking that some parents covet the idea of having a child that is a Doctor.

I would hope that those parents that want that for the kids are willing to pay for it. Doctors today end up with $300,000 to a $1,000,000 in student loan debt when they are done getting that "coveted" degree.

After speaking with Doctors over the years many would suggest having kids become RN's. The kid could start working now and continue their education. Many RN's go on to become Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants. The pay is great and you don't end up paying for a staff to run your office.
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Texas
13,480 posts, read 8,320,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
I don't know about it being the most coveted goal for a kid. I am thinking that some parents covet the idea of having a child that is a Doctor.

I would hope that those parents that want that for the kids are willing to pay for it. Doctors today end up with $300,000 to a $1,000,000 in student loan debt when they are done getting that "coveted" degree..
This. If the parent wants it, they must be prepared to shell out for it.

But no young person should do something just because of the perceived status of the profession or because the parent pushes it.
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Earth
7,644 posts, read 6,435,604 times
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yes
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Old 12-16-2019, 11:03 AM
 
19,580 posts, read 17,859,815 times
Reputation: 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Most aspiring physicians get weeded out in pre-med. I heard that 80% of students never pass inorganic chemistry (or is it organic?).

My degree is in engineering though.
Organic chemistry is the killer.

My son attended a school whose bio-department cranks out a very high number, proportionally anyway, of future doctors. His freshman year via a survey it was announced that 1,500+ kids wanted to be doctors. Ultimately right at 140 got into medical school.
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Old 12-16-2019, 11:08 AM
 
9,240 posts, read 9,709,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Organic chemistry is the killer.

My son attended a school whose bio-department cranks out a very high number, proportionally anyway, of future doctors. His freshman year via a survey it was announced that 1,500+ kids wanted to be doctors. Ultimately right at 140 got into medical school.
Organic chemistry has things to memorize, but it is much easier than physical chemistry. (I am not sure if biology majors take it, but chemistry majors do.)
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Old 12-16-2019, 11:19 AM
 
19,580 posts, read 17,859,815 times
Reputation: 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
I don't know about it being the most coveted goal for a kid. I am thinking that some parents covet the idea of having a child that is a Doctor.

I would hope that those parents that want that for the kids are willing to pay for it. Doctors today end up with $300,000 to a $1,000,000 in student loan debt when they are done getting that "coveted" degree.

After speaking with Doctors over the years many would suggest having kids become RN's. The kid could start working now and continue their education. Many RN's go on to become Nurse Practitioners and Physicians Assistants. The pay is great and you don't end up paying for a staff to run your office.
A little reality for you.

In 2019 the average new doc. has ~$250K in student loans. Less than 20% of medical school grads have over $300K in debt and those are centered around certain states and areas in which becoming a doc. is exceedingly expensive NY, SF, Boston etc.

_______________

I know a good number of doctors. I don't know one who has said they'd prefer their kid(s) be RNs, NPs, PAs over being a doc.

My MIL was an ER supervising RN for decades. She was very direct that she wanted her kids to become docs. lawyers, engineers etc.
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