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Old 12-17-2019, 12:47 PM
 
9,952 posts, read 6,568,033 times
Reputation: 19649

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
My daughter is an MS-1 at Baylor tuition, health insurance, malpractice, white coat ceremony, lab fee etc. was a shade under $28,000 this year.

My son went to UTSW........just looked it up this year tuition, books, health insurance etc. is a shade under $25,000.

USC is a shade over $66K, Columbia $67 etc.

______________________________________

I read somewhere that fewer than 110 people in The US have $1,000,000 or more in student loan debt. You can bet your bottom dollar that most of them are MD + Ph.D or MD + long residency + lengthy Fellowship types and they went to expensive UG and medical school and financed and deferred to the max.
Either way, most students should not come out with as much debt as that other poster indicates. If someone elects to do an expensive private university sticker price with loans for undergrad, grad school, and med school, that is on them. I know of one person who went to an expensive private university for med school, but that was partially because she has a chronic disease with a short life expectancy and could get much better care at that school than elsewhere. She moved away and came back because of the care she receives there and is doing well. For most, I would ask whether the cost difference is really worth it. When it is about your own life, I would say without a doubt, but otherwise, less expensive options are provably better.
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Old 12-17-2019, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,837 posts, read 6,105,710 times
Reputation: 12259
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
My daughter is an MS-1 at Baylor tuition, health insurance, malpractice, white coat ceremony, lab fee etc. was a shade under $28,000 this year.
Does BCM still offer lower tuition to Texas residents than out of state residents despite its being a private school? They did when my husband attended 20 years ago and the total cost per year was only around 10K, which was a veritable bargain for a Top 20 med school, certainly much lower than comparable institutions. Allowed him to graduate with relatively little debt, which he was able to pay off very quickly after starting practice, along with about 40K I had lingering from grad school.
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Old 12-17-2019, 08:22 PM
 
19,471 posts, read 17,702,664 times
Reputation: 17011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
Does BCM still offer lower tuition to Texas residents than out of state residents despite its being a private school? They did when my husband attended 20 years ago and the total cost per year was only around 10K, which was a veritable bargain for a Top 20 med school, certainly much lower than comparable institutions. Allowed him to graduate with relatively little debt, which he was able to pay off very quickly after starting practice, along with about 40K I had lingering from grad school.
Yes. It's still, along with UTSW, about the best bargain going.
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Old 12-17-2019, 08:59 PM
 
Location: SoCal
20,160 posts, read 12,650,485 times
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This is for UCLA medical school, it’s a state school. Non-resident adds $12,000 more. It could be $90k per year.
http://medschool.ucla.edu/current-student-budget

Undergraduate tuition.
http://www.admission.ucla.edu/Prospect/budget.htm
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Old 12-19-2019, 12:37 AM
 
10,181 posts, read 10,199,549 times
Reputation: 9251
To whomever sent me this in a "rep":

Quote:
Most Bio majors could not pass physical chemistry since two semesters of Calc are required.
This is how it works (again):

Chem majors are chem majors.

Bio majors are Bio majors.

Bio majors aren't Chem majors so apparently they don't need two semesters of Calc or a Physical Chem class to be a Bio major.

Chem majors aren't Bio majors and they apparently don't need to take advanced Bio classes/labs to major in chem.

The Chem majors take the classes they need in order to major in Chem.

The Bio majors take the classes they need in order to major in Bio.

What EXACTLY are you arguing & why?

Last edited by Informed Info; 12-19-2019 at 12:55 AM..
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Old 12-19-2019, 09:51 AM
 
19,471 posts, read 17,702,664 times
Reputation: 17011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Informed Info View Post
To whomever sent me this in a "rep":



This is how it works (again):

Chem majors are chem majors.

Bio majors are Bio majors.

Bio majors aren't Chem majors so apparently they don't need two semesters of Calc or a Physical Chem class to be a Bio major.

Chem majors aren't Bio majors and they apparently don't need to take advanced Bio classes/labs to major in chem.

The Chem majors take the classes they need in order to major in Chem.

The Bio majors take the classes they need in order to major in Bio.

What EXACTLY are you arguing & why?
The other guy, maybe unintentionally, is painting a distorted picture.

1. The one calculus class thing is a minimum possible admissions standard at some medical schools. Not the requirements for say BS Bio undergrad. Medical schools want to give themselves some wiggle room for non-traditional students.................say a guy with a Ph.D in nursing and 20 years experience. Or the 18yo phenom high school grad who makes a 523 MCAT.

2. My son's BS Bio. mathish degree minimum requirements were 1). calculus for majors I and II. 2). calculus based physics I and II................those 14 hours were set in stone. 3). at least three more hours in something like bio. statistics, another physics, another calculus, calculus based statistics, diff-E etc.

3. The other guy is also co-mingling bio. majors and medical school admits. Most bio. majors have no shot at medical school. Just as most bio. majors can't get into medical school, most chemistry majors can't either nor most math majors etc.
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Old 12-19-2019, 10:06 AM
 
Location: SoCal
20,160 posts, read 12,650,485 times
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My nephew and one niece were bio majors. But the nephew was also majored in Japanese, and Literature. That’s one of the many reasons why his grades suffered, he didn’t get into medical school until his second try.
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Old 12-19-2019, 10:33 AM
 
9,255 posts, read 9,679,665 times
Reputation: 3310
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
My nephew and one niece were bio majors. But the nephew was also majored in Japanese, and Literature. That’s one of the many reasons why his grades suffered, he didn’t get into medical school until his second try.
I think going to medical school is indeed a western/American thing.
None of the top students in my high school (in China) chose to study medicine. They all went for engineering and sciences. Some finance. The admissions scores of medical schools are also lower than engineering programs of the same university.

In developing countries like China, doctors are not paid very well, but engineers are in high demand. At entry level, an engineer is usually paid twice as much as a doctor.
Also, schools in China emphasize math and physics, so good students tend to pick math-heavy subjects when they can.
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:03 PM
 
Location: S-E Michigan
4,260 posts, read 5,887,082 times
Reputation: 10775
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
When were you in school? My son is set to graduate pre-med this spring, take a gap year and then take the MCAT. He has been extolling the virtues of the DO philosophy but I never thought about it in terms of DO's being shunned by the Establishment. I don't have a medical background at all, so there's no way for me to advise my son one way or the other but I'm curious now.

Our youngest son graduated Med School in 2018. Early in his program he told me the differences between the MD and DO degree were insignificant to non-existent. In fact, a surprising percentage, maybe 1/3, of the Professors teaching his MD program were DO's themselves! I 'believe' his Residency Program is treating both degrees as equal when interviewing and accepting new Med School graduates - but I could be wrong.


If your son is allowing suggestions, suggest he apply to both types of programs using location, strength of intended specialty program, reputation, availability of scholarship funds, overall lower costs, etc., as the deciding factors. Med School is so difficult to enter, why would anyone want to eliminate half of the potential schools when the profession now treats the degrees as equals?
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:44 PM
 
19,471 posts, read 17,702,664 times
Reputation: 17011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
I think going to medical school is indeed a western/American thing.
None of the top students in my high school (in China) chose to study medicine. They all went for engineering and sciences. Some finance. The admissions scores of medical schools are also lower than engineering programs of the same university.

In developing countries like China, doctors are not paid very well, but engineers are in high demand. At entry level, an engineer is usually paid twice as much as a doctor.
Also, schools in China emphasize math and physics, so good students tend to pick math-heavy subjects when they can.
Across much of the world doctors are much more like very highly skilled nurses than what we think of as docs. The pathways to becoming a doc. in The US and Canada are just far more demanding. In Australia for example it's customary to begin medical school just after high school.
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