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Old 12-12-2019, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,627 posts, read 12,242,954 times
Reputation: 20013

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
Which you can do and make a lucrative living from it.
You can make a lucrative income as a broadcaster on ESPN but it the odds aren't great. Lots of folks out there that probably want to do it. I wonder how many of them actually make it, or have the requisite technical skills to be successful. I know a lot of guys that wanted to work in Wildlife Biology since they love to hunt and fish. When they find out a handful of things about the field, right around graduation or shortly after, their interest wanes. I can say the same thing about Golf Pros and a dozen other career fields.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Screenwriter70 View Post
It was never true with my family. But then, most of the older generation lived under Jim Crow & worked paycheck to paycheck. Life was different for them, and I guess they couldn't envision it as being any better for their descendants.
Certain cultures are known to be much more ambitious with regards to their children's success, and I can't think of anything that so succinctly, and without refutation, is a sign of achievement to the whole of society. Med School admission is tough, Doctors are highly respected and well paid. Despite the tune that many doctors sing about how much worse it's been, I've never seen one that leaves medicine for marketing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by clawsondude View Post
It's good to guide your kids towards a good profession. Pushing your kids towards a specific career that they may show no interest in is a recipe for disaster.
The best thing a parent can do is push them towards utilizing their best talents. I have a brother that wanted to be an engineer. He has the requisite mechanical aptitudes but most people could have told him he didn't have the requisite math and science chops. My parents wanted to encourage him and I think it was a bad idea. You really need "I excelled in Honors and AP math" and he "didn't struggle in college prep math." I think the experience ultimately really damaged him in ways he still deals with. They say "College isn't for everyone" but I really think he would have been better off being advised to study something that took advantage of his other talents, I can think of a handful of majors that would have been far better suited for him.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:19 AM
 
3,678 posts, read 4,119,549 times
Reputation: 3332
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
My wife demands that one of our kids become a doctor, regardless of their interest. Or I should say she attempts to nurture their interest in this field.

I think this is primarily due to the conventional thinking that doctors are one of the best professions.

Is that conventional thinking still true on the eve of 2020?
Most coveted goal is to study something which you find interesting and excelling in it.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:32 AM
 
1,563 posts, read 1,106,504 times
Reputation: 5119
GenX'er here and I don't recall anyone back in the day wanting to be a doctor honestly. Most "kids" thought being a Fireman, Architect, Spy or Astronaut was top pick.

These days my kids want to be Directors, Cinematographers, Actors or involved in theater.

Personally driving a kid towards something they don't want to do will only end in heartache. Either for yourself as the relationship sours, or as they become miserable. Believe it of not, some kids were just designed to be Architects while others enjoy helping old people. They frequently come hard wired that way. You can't change it.

As a parent our job is to find a kids strength's and nurture them. Ignore their weakness. If they have a tender heart but suck at advanced math so be it. If they love adding numbers and hate art, so be it. Stop forcing them to do the advanced math or art. It's just tears and heartache.

For myself I did not figure any of that out until well in my late thirties. Was always trying to fix the areas I was weakest in. It's dumb. Wasn't until I figured out what I'm was good at did my career take off. It's better if we teach our kids that right out of the gate so they don't have to wait until they are 40 to figure it out.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Hellinois
5,820 posts, read 3,821,202 times
Reputation: 8123
Interesting thread. For much of elementary school, I used to say "I want to be a doctor" because it was the "normal" profession for kids who weren't athletic. (For those who were, it was basketball player, because Michael Jordan.) I learned it the hard way: once in 1st or 2nd grade, I told a few teachers I wanted to be an engineer (or maybe scientist, I forgot), and they made a big deal of it. I didn't like that, so I picked a more "normal" profession to tell people.

While I always found computers interesting, I didn't properly decide on going into IT until high school. Today, I see computers the same way strip club dancers see men: an income source I mildly despise. Especially Apple devices.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:39 AM
 
1,563 posts, read 1,106,504 times
Reputation: 5119
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
The best thing a parent can do is push them towards utilizing their best talents. I have a brother that wanted to be an engineer. He has the requisite mechanical aptitudes but most people could have told him he didn't have the requisite math and science chops. My parents wanted to encourage him and I think it was a bad idea. You really need "I excelled in Honors and AP math" and he "didn't struggle in college prep math." I think the experience ultimately really damaged him in ways he still deals with. They say "College isn't for everyone" but I really think he would have been better off being advised to study something that took advantage of his other talents, I can think of a handful of majors that would have been far better suited for him.
So much YES. I want to click on this 10 times if I could.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:45 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
15,197 posts, read 10,158,323 times
Reputation: 32130
I think years ago being a doctor was a prestigious occupation, especially in the days when people treated them like one step under God. I don't think people, especially those under 60, hold doctors in the high esteem they used to.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: The Carolinas
2,509 posts, read 2,797,734 times
Reputation: 7964
If it's money you wish your child to seek, have them become a politician or start a bank.
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Old 12-12-2019, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,627 posts, read 12,242,954 times
Reputation: 20013
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2Loud View Post
GenX'er here and I don't recall anyone back in the day wanting to be a doctor honestly. Most "kids" thought being a Fireman, Architect, Spy or Astronaut was top pick.

These days my kids want to be Directors, Cinematographers, Actors or involved in theater.

Personally driving a kid towards something they don't want to do will only end in heartache. Either for yourself as the relationship sours, or as they become miserable. Believe it of not, some kids were just designed to be Architects while others enjoy helping old people. They frequently come hard wired that way. You can't change it.

As a parent our job is to find a kids strength's and nurture them. Ignore their weakness. If they have a tender heart but suck at advanced math so be it. If they love adding numbers and hate art, so be it. Stop forcing them to do the advanced math or art. It's just tears and heartache.

For myself I did not figure any of that out until well in my late thirties. Was always trying to fix the areas I was weakest in. It's dumb. Wasn't until I figured out what I'm was good at did my career take off. It's better if we teach our kids that right out of the gate so they don't have to wait until they are 40 to figure it out.
Probably equally important (and i'm not saying you tell this to an eleven year old) is if they want to be in a field that requires something they don't have, guide them accordingly.
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Old 12-12-2019, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Texas
13,480 posts, read 8,284,755 times
Reputation: 25941
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
We do need to guide the kids somewhat. Otherwise my kids would major in video games..
I'm not talking about letting a kid play video games all day long or goof off. I'm talking about not pushing them into a certain career. And if your kid doesn't have the aptitude for medical school I can assure you it's not ever going to work anyway. I have relatives who are doctors and I can assure you medical school is not right for everyone.

Status careers may seem appealing but there is a huge price to pay in terms of time spent in school, costs (massive debt, unless you are able to pay for it in cash), and stress.
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Old 12-12-2019, 10:45 AM
 
3,600 posts, read 1,623,691 times
Reputation: 3198
I was that kid...Pre-Med is very difficult (many drop out)...switched to Business Admistration...a better fit for me. The best Doctors (a tough profession) have a true passion for it and choose it on their own, rather than being steered into it by parents.
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