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Old 04-16-2020, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
13,561 posts, read 10,351,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Right my kids are an MS-1 and a PGY-3. By way of agreeing with you the physician track is way too long in years, too difficult both in terms of competition and baseline rigor, too likely to end in failure for most etc. etc........young people who head off in that direction should have a love for the craft or be prepared to hate the trip. Once there being a physician is no cake walk either.

That being said the money angle vs. other professions is fairly straightforward via bar napkin arithmatic.
My sister is a pediatrician. It affords her the flexibility of working part time or managing her hours, better for family life. But of course, to get there she had to spend all those years of school and training.
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Old 04-16-2020, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
1,651 posts, read 1,301,849 times
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With this pandemic, I wonder this will affect the attractiveness of medical career...

Seems can be a high-risk profession, even if this does not happen often.
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Old 04-16-2020, 10:00 PM
 
Location: SF/Mill Valley
8,659 posts, read 3,858,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
My sister is a pediatrician. It affords her the flexibility of working part time or managing her hours, better for family life. But of course, to get there she had to spend all those years of school and training.
She's likely earning more part-time than many (in other jobs) do full-time, good for her; the education was put to good use (assuming, of course, it's what she wanted to do).
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Old 04-19-2020, 05:23 PM
 
Location: NY/LA
4,663 posts, read 4,546,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjseliga View Post
Sure the connections made at those places are so-called "priceless", but the brilliance of the students would have been there regardless of the school or maybe even no school at all. Did both Gates and Zuckerberg need to go to Harvard (I know both didn't graduate) to become who they are today, probably not, could both have gotten into medical school, if they wanted and became physicians, probably.
Didn't Zuckerberg start Facebook with other Harvard students? Being able to collaborate with other accomplished and ambitious colleagues is part of the reason why you go to a school like that. If he didn't go to Harvard, I'm not so sure he would have ended up in the same place.

Regarding the original topic, I'm not a physician, but my wife is a surgeon. If I had to do it all over again, I would have gone into medicine, and unless our kids had a strong passion for something else, I would urge them to follow my wife's footsteps and go into medicine as well.
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Old 04-19-2020, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Huntsville Area
1,948 posts, read 1,514,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CorporateCowboy View Post
Many companies won't even look at a candidate unless he/she graduated from an Ivy (and the difference in payscales, and even more importantly opportunity, is dramatically different); this is clear to anyone who has worked (or even interned in) the corporate world. When competition is fierce, it's the PoDunk U graduates you hear about who can't find a job and end up working retail or flipping burgers (because they probably shouldn't have bothered to get an MBA in an oversaturated market from a mediocre school in the first place).

That said, relative to the OP, it doesn't matter what is coveted; if the person isn't motivated by their own choices and/or abilities, they won't be successful (and probably not very happy either).
My very best friend went to Penn to get a Masters in Finance at Wharton School of Business. I used to go up Philadelphia to visit him from time to time. I remembered all the talk in the student newspaper bragging what the starting salaries were for Wharton graduates.

When he graduated, he'd figured out the many undergraduate students were picking up the salaries of the famous professors that only taught in the MBA and PhD programs, not undergraduate. Undergraduate students could have gone to a cheaper state university or lesser priced university than spending $72,584 tuition plus another $30K living expenses at Penn.
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Old 04-19-2020, 09:58 PM
 
Location: SF/Mill Valley
8,659 posts, read 3,858,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bamaman1 View Post
My very best friend went to Penn to get a Masters in Finance at Wharton School of Business. I used to go up Philadelphia to visit him from time to time. I remembered all the talk in the student newspaper bragging what the starting salaries were for Wharton graduates.

When he graduated, he'd figured out the many undergraduate students were picking up the salaries of the famous professors that only taught in the MBA and PhD programs, not undergraduate. Undergraduate students could have gone to a cheaper state university or lesser priced university than spending $72,584 tuition plus another $30K living expenses at Penn.
I can't speak to Wharton specifically (or bragging in student newspapers, lol), but the first year earnings of HBS graduates are well-documented/studied year-after-year, most notably appearing in Forbes as well as released by experts in global management and executive-level hires/CEO succession. (Keep in mind what it takes to hire in at McKinsey or Bain, for example). That said, I agree the undergraduate degree/school matters less, though it's certainly relative in terms of acceptance into a graduate program at an elite university (or even a top-tiered school) - in the same way it would be for medical school (per the thread). There are many 'mediocre' MBAs/programs (and students) requiring one to stand out in career and earnings; hopefully, there aren't many mediocre physicians.

Bringing it back around to the topic, all of it is irrelevant if the individual isn't motivated by his or her own abilities/ambition (rather than being pushed or prodded along by a parent).
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Old 05-18-2020, 09:00 AM
 
7,329 posts, read 4,121,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
My wife demands that one of our kids become a doctor, regardless of their interest. Or I should say she attempts to nurture their interest in this field.

I think this is primarily due to the conventional thinking that doctors are one of the best professions.

Is that conventional thinking still true on the eve of 2020?
With elective surgeries cancelled due to the pandemic, many doctors aren't getting paid. Never mind the death rates of doctors treating coronavirus patients. Hospitals are struggling financially too.

Quote:
An estimated 1.4 million health care workers lost their jobs in April. That's up from about 40,000 in March, according to numbers released Friday by the Labor Department. And this is happening as the COVID-19 pandemic spreads across the country.

Is your wife still pro-med school for your kids?
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Old 05-21-2020, 01:53 PM
 
1,761 posts, read 2,605,383 times
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I don't think there will ever be a time in which "becoming a doctor" is not regarded as the fantasy of most parents (whether or not the kid has an interest in the field or not). Now there are other fields that can also "make the big bucks" , so I don't see Doctor being the end all be all, but it will forever be regarded as one of the dream professions for many parents for their children.
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Old 05-25-2020, 02:43 PM
 
603 posts, read 573,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertFisher View Post
My wife demands that one of our kids become a doctor, regardless of their interest. Or I should say she attempts to nurture their interest in this field.

I think this is primarily due to the conventional thinking that doctors are one of the best professions.

Is that conventional thinking still true on the eve of 2020?
No, it isn’t.
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Old 05-26-2020, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Midwest
9,410 posts, read 11,153,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
I was a kid and I did not think that way.
"Famous" and rich are different too.
Me either. Cop or army guy, I had no concept of wealth.

Today it seems fame is a very popular goal. The selfie generation. Some fall off cliffs seeking fame.

The difference between fame and greatness is lost on many.
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