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Old 12-13-2019, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Centennial, CO
2,245 posts, read 3,026,049 times
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IF that's what one wants to do, there is certainly a lot of variation of types of medicine and practices to get into. ER docs generally have no real lives. Constantly on call. Lots of hours. Paid well but not that much more than other types of docs who deal with much less stress. It takes a special kid of person to want to live that life. Needs to be a true calling.

On the other hand, I have a really good friend from college who ended up as a podiatrist (foot doctor). He works at a clinic which has normal daytime hours and rarely is there an emergency he has to come in for immediately (foot emergencies aren't exactly that common). He gets tons of days off and vacation, and makes somewhere in the range north of $250k. Yes, he had a lot of loans and had to go through a lot of schooling and residency, but he was making real money by 30 which isn't that bad really. His wife is a doc, too (ENT) so even though they have had a lot of loans with their salary's combined they are doing just fine and now have them essentially paid off.
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Old 12-13-2019, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
10,297 posts, read 7,877,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShampooBanana View Post
ER docs generally have no real lives. Constantly on call.
ER docs these days generally don't take call at all, and they worked fixed-hour shifts. BUT those shifts include overnight (which can screw up the body's circadian rhythms), weekends, and holidays, and they can be long and super-stressful.

It's the OB docs and (especially) general surgeons who lead lives of constant call.
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Old 12-13-2019, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania/Maine
3,700 posts, read 2,628,657 times
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Typical conventional medical doctor schools are largely controlled and funded by drug companies. "Ask your doctor". Bazillion tv drug ads today. That's what the profession has become. Let your kid decide his/her future.
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Old 12-13-2019, 12:21 PM
 
6,503 posts, read 3,383,623 times
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Most of the times, if kids say this is their desired profession, they have a preconceived idea of what being a doctor will be like. I can almost assure you it doesn't include electronic medical records, compliance, or 30 hour shifts during their residency
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Old 12-13-2019, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
8,851 posts, read 5,765,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
Most of the times, if kids say this is their desired profession, they have a preconceived idea of what being a doctor will be like. I can almost assure you it doesn't include electronic medical records, compliance, or 30 hour shifts during their residency
Yes; or the paper-work/administrative side, which can seem as time-consuming or more than actually practicing medicine. That was what was most shocking to me when practicing.

Also, if you do internal medicine, you can expect having to deal with pretty tough patient encounters pretty regularly. Certainly not a glamorous career, which is why derm/radiology and a few others are so competitive.

The other thing, fair or not, is you want to get into an Allopathic (MD) school rather than an Osteopathic (DO). In the world of medicine, from residency to future jobs, having a MD degree from a US school makes your life so much easier. Many times, unfairly, because DO schools are less competitive, there is some skepticism that follows them throughout their careers.

I am somewhat fortunate in that I never even considered DO schools. I always wanted to get into my state medical school, which like most is allopathic (MD), so I always had that in my focus. Luckily I had the grades and was able to pull off a good enough MCAT score to get into my state school (MD).

I had a couple friends who unfortunately (either grades or MCAT), had to go the DO route. Haven't really kept up with them, but from what I've seen as a resident and my brief time as an Attending, they have an even tougher hill to climb throughout their careers and less prestige (many lay people don't know what the DO designation means).
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Old 12-13-2019, 02:09 PM
 
6,503 posts, read 3,383,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Yes; or the paper-work/administrative side, which can seem as time-consuming or more than actually practicing medicine. That was what was most shocking to me when practicing.

Also, if you do internal medicine, you can expect having to deal with pretty tough patient encounters pretty regularly. Certainly not a glamorous career, which is why derm/radiology and a few others are so competitive.

The other thing, fair or not, is you want to get into an Allopathic (MD) school rather than an Osteopathic (DO). In the world of medicine, from residency to future jobs, having a MD degree from a US school makes your life so much easier. Many times, unfairly, because DO schools are less competitive, there is some skepticism that follows them throughout their careers.

I am somewhat fortunate in that I never even considered DO schools. I always wanted to get into my state medical school, which like most is allopathic (MD), so I always had that in my focus. Luckily I had the grades and was able to pull off a good enough MCAT score to get into my state school (MD).

I had a couple friends who unfortunately (either grades or MCAT), had to go the DO route. Haven't really kept up with them, but from what I've seen as a resident and my brief time as an Attending, they have an even tougher hill to climb throughout their careers and less prestige (many lay people don't know what the DO designation means).
I myself couldn't tell you the difference between an MD and a DO. I didn't know, and even after your explanation, I'm not sure I fully understand.

Regarding what I bolded above, where does fertility rank in competitiveness on the scale? They seem to be able to work M-F, without rotating shifts.
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Old 12-13-2019, 02:25 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,217 posts, read 28,295,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsvibe View Post
The people with the largest incomes that I have had the pleasure to work with were all Engineers. Everyone of them designed and patented a useful object and had a lifetime of income. I'm not going to list the objects because it will give away their identity, but I will tell you the fields.


Petroleum extraction, 30 Million a year in royalties at the time I worked with this person.
Steel production, 8 Million a year.
Medical device, 2.5 Million a year.
Those would be extreme outliers. The vast, vast, vast majority of engineers never make that kind of money.

By the way, 90% of patents are essentially worthless and don’t generate any money.
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Old 12-13-2019, 03:06 PM
 
6,503 posts, read 3,383,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Those would be extreme outliers. The vast, vast, vast majority of engineers never make that kind of money.

By the way, 90% of patents are essentially worthless and don’t generate any money.
I think most patents are filed with the "Plan B" that even if the idea doesn't take off, it remains a trip wire waiting for an unsuspecting product company to cross it.

By the very nature of there being so darn many, I can see how it would not be practical to wade through each and every one to ensure your design or idea doesn't infringe.

Many times, companies happen to find out only once their idea gets promoted and (sometimes literally) lands on the right (wrong) doorstep, and then all hell breaks loose.
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Old 12-13-2019, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
7,934 posts, read 7,276,082 times
Reputation: 16052
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
My son is an neurosurgery resident. Parroting my son.......if your kiddo hasn't taken o-chem II he should before taking the MCAT.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
Organic Chemistry II! Yikes, O-chem I was notorious enough. Thanks for the tip, I'll work it into the conversation over the Christmas break.
OK, I just confirmed that he has Orgo II on his Spring semester schedule. Fingers crossed!
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Old 12-13-2019, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
7,934 posts, read 7,276,082 times
Reputation: 16052
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
I am somewhat fortunate in that I never even considered DO schools. I always wanted to get into my state medical school, which like most is allopathic (MD), so I always had that in my focus. Luckily I had the grades and was able to pull off a good enough MCAT score to get into my state school (MD).

I had a couple friends who unfortunately (either grades or MCAT), had to go the DO route. Haven't really kept up with them, but from what I've seen as a resident and my brief time as an Attending, they have an even tougher hill to climb throughout their careers and less prestige (many lay people don't know what the DO designation means).
When were you in school? My son is set to graduate pre-med this spring, take a gap year and then take the MCAT. He has been extolling the virtues of the DO philosophy but I never thought about it in terms of DO's being shunned by the Establishment. I don't have a medical background at all, so there's no way for me to advise my son one way or the other but I'm curious now.
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