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Old 08-16-2020, 01:36 PM
 
Location: So Ca
19,406 posts, read 17,528,939 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCresident2014 View Post
Wow where in the country are you that your school spends only $9,300 per student per year?
Colorado, Florida, Mississippi, and N.C. all spend around that (and Oklahoma, Idaho and TN spend below that figure). Wac possibly made a mistake; per pupil spending is about $11,368 in California.
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Old 08-16-2020, 08:17 PM
 
2,875 posts, read 988,984 times
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I have no doubt that the public schools are generally doing the best they can given the constraints they operate under. It's not as if educators have ulterior motives so powerful that they would push out the headline reasons one becomes an educator. Those being to share a love of knowledge and shape young minds.

Moreover private schools may not even be pedagogically superior. The dirty secret of private schools is that most of the testing and outcome advantages they hold over public schools are due to selective enrollment.
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Old 08-17-2020, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
6,834 posts, read 4,518,728 times
Reputation: 11735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avondalist View Post
I have no doubt that the public schools are generally doing the best they can given the constraints they operate under. It's not as if educators have ulterior motives so powerful that they would push out the headline reasons one becomes an educator. Those being to share a love of knowledge and shape young minds.

Moreover private schools may not even be pedagogically superior. The dirty secret of private schools is that most of the testing and outcome advantages they hold over public schools are due to selective enrollment.
Smaller class size is a big advantage.
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Old 08-17-2020, 08:28 AM
 
300 posts, read 105,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NORTY FLATZ View Post
And on the "flip-side," we have $9,300 per student, per year. With 24 students per class, let's take a quick look at the math, here.

$9300 X 24 = $223,200 per class.

So, figure the teacher pulls down $60,000 (Salary + benefits.) Give or take.

Figure books, and other incidentals $16000 (Pulled # out of butt.) More or less.

The building is paid for, via bond. There's zero taxes paid on the whole school. They get parents to volunteer to paint the buildings every so often. Ok, maybe the district buys the paint, but I doubt it.

MGMT overhead (Board/Custodians/hookers/admin.)

So, that leaves approx. $147,200 per class.

WHERE'S THE MONEY?

WHO'S GOT THE MONEY?

Anyone seeing something WRONG here?

And this is just for 1, single classroom.

Whoops, forgot about school lunches. Figure $3.25/per day. ($585)
I believe you forgot some substantial costs such as: administration, counselors, substitute teachers, coaches, sports, transportation, electricity, janitors, security guards. If average health care costs are about $10 k per employee that needs to be added to you figures.

I imagine your local school budget is audited and public information. If you decide to get the facts I'd be very interested to know how this pencils out.
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Old 08-17-2020, 08:45 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
26,199 posts, read 43,945,757 times
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USA Schools are very, very inexpensive care for children, and if they are able to add in a little educational content.... That is a perk.

Most in USA consider school as free!

We are not known for our superior math and effective strategy skills.
That was not in our core curriculum
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Old 08-17-2020, 10:43 AM
 
300 posts, read 105,235 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavlov's Dog View Post
I believe you forgot some substantial costs such as: administration, counselors, substitute teachers, coaches, sports, transportation, electricity, janitors, security guards. If average health care costs are about $10 k per employee that needs to be added to you figures.

I imagine your local school budget is audited and public information. If you decide to get the facts I'd be very interested to know how this pencils out.
I checked out the 2019-20 for the school district in Oregon where I grew up.

In terms of employees:

493.88 FTEs on instruction
134 support services

salaries average out to $67,200 but other payroll costs are an additional $38,400 per employee. Healthcare, pensions and other benefits are clearly really expensive.

Payroll costs make up 49.6% of the budget. Coaching and extracurricular instruction costs are in payroll

Note that those bonds are coming out of the school budget and are 10% of the budget. Note also that this school district has the luxury (or mandate) to allocate 10% to a rainy day fund which I'm certain will be very handy this school year.

Purchased services 10.4 %
supplies and materials 5.6 %
Capital outlay 3.4 %
Other objects 27 %
Debt service 10 %
Planned reserves 10 %

That averages out to $9,700 per student for payroll and 19,760 per student total. The district also does outreach to students whom have dropped out so the number of potential students is higher.

I'm sure every school district is different but I hope this gives an indicator of how our tax money is being spent
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Old 08-17-2020, 01:29 PM
 
5,945 posts, read 1,727,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
So, with schools closed and their usual indoor activities banned, all the local gyms, dance studios, and anyone with indoor space and warm adult bodies is jumping on the childcare/tutoring bandwagon. For day care with activities and "tutoring" during regular school day hours, the typical charge is $400/week/child.

So that's $80/day/child. The schools here are required to provide a minimum of 180 instructional days. That would total $14,400/child for an entire year of daycare by unknown randos. The local school district spends $9,300/child to provide them instruction from accredited teachers.

The one caveat is that group sizes are supposedly limited to 12. Since our local schools usually have 24 student classes, there's an argument that perhaps the cost per student of these smaller class sizes might grow significantly.

I wonder if our local schools could shrink class sizes by half with 150% of their current funding?

In any case, schools clearly are a cheaper, safer, and better place to educate and care for children than dance studios or day cares. But it is what it is.
I think that the above are the go-to alternatives when a WFH (SFH? School From Home?) arrangement just won't work from a childcare standpoint.

However, for the parents who work from home (not just temporarily due to COVID), I have always wondered - Are there some parents who simply supervise and placate their children during their 8-5 workday, then switch to a home school curriculum in the evenings? Is this possible?
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Old 08-18-2020, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Sandy Eggo's North County
798 posts, read 111,060 times
Reputation: 932
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavlov's Dog View Post
I believe you forgot some substantial costs such as: administration, counselors, substitute teachers, coaches, sports, transportation, electricity, janitors, security guards. If average health care costs are about $10 k per employee that needs to be added to you figures.
I covered "admin, custodian, hookers & board."
Transportation has all but eliminated (with the exception of "Special Ed.")
Healthcare insurance costs $2910 per person, per year. (this includes dental & vision.) Sweet deal, huh?
Quote:

I imagine your local school budget is audited and public information. If you decide to get the facts I'd be very interested to know how this pencils out.
Just looked.

There's still millions of dollars not accounted for...

Could be the trips to Cancun for admin/boards?

And yet they're crying because they have NO MONEY.....
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Old 08-19-2020, 01:16 AM
 
300 posts, read 105,235 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORTY FLATZ View Post
I covered "admin, custodian, hookers & board."
Transportation has all but eliminated (with the exception of "Special Ed.")
Healthcare insurance costs $2910 per person, per year. (this includes dental & vision.) Sweet deal, huh? Just looked.

There's still millions of dollars not accounted for...

Could be the trips to Cancun for admin/boards?

And yet they're crying because they have NO MONEY.....
That is really cheap health care. I am surprised they are able to hire anybody of quality because their co-pay is going to be sky high.

You should try to get on your local school board budget committee if you want to do something about it. Run for office. File a freedom of information inquiry. Find out a line item and receipt level what's going on if you are sincere in your suspicions.
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Old 08-22-2020, 03:30 PM
 
Location: So Ca
19,406 posts, read 17,528,939 times
Reputation: 17009
Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
every Tom Dick and Harry can open their own Daycare with NO sanitation or background checks for 12+a few more students. No masks. Unknown and unenforced distancing. Unknown (no) periodic sanitization.
Since the coronavirus shut down the state in mid-March, financial losses, concerns about exposure to the virus and navigating a maze of new safety guidelines have forced some 9,300 licensed child-care providers — almost 1 of every 4 in the state — to close, according to data from the California Department of Social Services that shows closures through July 31.

More than 1,200 of the closings are permanent, eliminating roughly 19,000 child-care spots, the state figures show. There is no way to know how many of the thousands of others that have shut their doors during the pandemic will eventually reopen or when, leaving the full effect of pandemic on child care uncertain. A recent survey by the Center for American Progress estimated that California was at risk of losing more than half of its available child-care slots.


https://www.latimes.com/california/s...ons-california
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