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Old 08-14-2020, 12:41 PM
 
1,974 posts, read 1,167,178 times
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So, with schools closed and their usual indoor activities banned, all the local gyms, dance studios, and anyone with indoor space and warm adult bodies is jumping on the childcare/tutoring bandwagon. For day care with activities and "tutoring" during regular school day hours, the typical charge is $400/week/child.

So that's $80/day/child. The schools here are required to provide a minimum of 180 instructional days. That would total $14,400/child for an entire year of daycare by unknown randos. The local school district spends $9,300/child to provide them instruction from accredited teachers.

The one caveat is that group sizes are supposedly limited to 12. Since our local schools usually have 24 student classes, there's an argument that perhaps the cost per student of these smaller class sizes might grow significantly.

I wonder if our local schools could shrink class sizes by half with 150% of their current funding?

In any case, schools clearly are a cheaper, safer, and better place to educate and care for children than dance studios or day cares. But it is what it is.
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Old 08-14-2020, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
6,834 posts, read 4,516,630 times
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$80 per day per student seems to be the going rate for the private "teacher-pods" that are popping up in affluent communities.
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Old 08-14-2020, 08:52 PM
 
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I love how the idea of keeping schools closed was to stop the spread of COVID-19 in 12 kid classrooms, yet every Tom Dick and Harry can open their own Daycare with NO sanitation or background checks for 12+a few more students. No masks. Unknown and unenforced distancing. Unknown (no) periodic sanitization.

Oh, but go ahead and hit any working parents up for an additional $1600 per month.

We're lucky, we are evacuating. What a s-show...
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Old 08-14-2020, 09:22 PM
 
8,213 posts, read 4,639,990 times
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While I get the point you're trying to make, I suspect the parents willing to pay to have their kids in in daycare are NOT the ones who are complaining about the risk at school. Those parents would be ecstatic to have the schools open. And likewise the ones who want the schools closed are not sending their kids to daycare.
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Old 08-15-2020, 10:37 AM
 
Location: So Ca
19,391 posts, read 17,517,888 times
Reputation: 16976
Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
I love how the idea of keeping schools closed was to stop the spread of COVID-19 in 12 kid classrooms, yet every Tom Dick and Harry can open their own Daycare with NO sanitation or background checks for 12+a few more students. No masks. Unknown and unenforced distancing. Unknown (no) periodic sanitization.
Are you sure? I've heard that it's fairly strict.

https://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesource...care-licensing
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Old 08-16-2020, 02:18 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
7,860 posts, read 11,584,574 times
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Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
Are you sure? I've heard that it's fairly strict.

https://www.cdss.ca.gov/inforesource...care-licensing
"Guidelines" are words on a computer screen.
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Old 08-16-2020, 06:08 AM
 
Location: So Ca
19,391 posts, read 17,517,888 times
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Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
"Guidelines" are words on a computer screen.
Not in California.

https://www.cdss.ca.gov/reporting/fi...cld-complaints
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Old 08-16-2020, 08:53 AM
 
8,513 posts, read 4,832,839 times
Reputation: 18110
Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
So, with schools closed and their usual indoor activities banned, all the local gyms, dance studios, and anyone with indoor space and warm adult bodies is jumping on the childcare/tutoring bandwagon. For day care with activities and "tutoring" during regular school day hours, the typical charge is $400/week/child.

So that's $80/day/child. The schools here are required to provide a minimum of 180 instructional days. That would total $14,400/child for an entire year of daycare by unknown randos. The local school district spends $9,300/child to provide them instruction from accredited teachers.

The one caveat is that group sizes are supposedly limited to 12. Since our local schools usually have 24 student classes, there's an argument that perhaps the cost per student of these smaller class sizes might grow significantly.

I wonder if our local schools could shrink class sizes by half with 150% of their current funding?

In any case, schools clearly are a cheaper, safer, and better place to educate and care for children than dance studios or day cares. But it is what it is.
Of course tutoring is more expensive than public education en masse. Always has been. Tutoring is also more effective.

School isn't daycare. So comparing the two isn't valid. Daycares specialize in taking only certain ages, provide certain services, arrange certain activities for pleasure and mental stimulation, provide naps & snacks. That's not what a school does.

But yes, public school is a bargain. But it's less effective than private school or tutoring, of course, because of the focused teaching, the interest of the students, the smaller groups (or even one-on-one).
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Old 08-16-2020, 12:17 PM
 
1,824 posts, read 1,245,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
So, with schools closed and their usual indoor activities banned, all the local gyms, dance studios, and anyone with indoor space and warm adult bodies is jumping on the childcare/tutoring bandwagon. For day care with activities and "tutoring" during regular school day hours, the typical charge is $400/week/child.

So that's $80/day/child. The schools here are required to provide a minimum of 180 instructional days. That would total $14,400/child for an entire year of daycare by unknown randos. The local school district spends $9,300/child to provide them instruction from accredited teachers.

The one caveat is that group sizes are supposedly limited to 12. Since our local schools usually have 24 student classes, there's an argument that perhaps the cost per student of these smaller class sizes might grow significantly.

I wonder if our local schools could shrink class sizes by half with 150% of their current funding?

In any case, schools clearly are a cheaper, safer, and better place to educate and care for children than dance studios or day cares. But it is what it is.
Wow where in the country are you that your school spends only $9,300 per student per year? I just looked at my local school district's budget website, it says "[my] school district spends $26,900 per student per year, which is below the state of NY average of $34,144 per student"

At this price, it's almost cheaper to send them to college instead of paying for the town to educate these kids.
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Old 08-16-2020, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Sandy Eggo's North County
783 posts, read 108,602 times
Reputation: 930
Quote:
Originally Posted by wac_432 View Post
So, with schools closed and their usual indoor activities banned, all the local gyms, dance studios, and anyone with indoor space and warm adult bodies is jumping on the childcare/tutoring bandwagon. For day care with activities and "tutoring" during regular school day hours, the typical charge is $400/week/child.

So that's $80/day/child. The schools here are required to provide a minimum of 180 instructional days. That would total $14,400/child for an entire year of daycare by unknown randos. The local school district spends $9,300/child to provide them instruction from accredited teachers.

The one caveat is that group sizes are supposedly limited to 12. Since our local schools usually have 24 student classes, there's an argument that perhaps the cost per student of these smaller class sizes might grow significantly.

I wonder if our local schools could shrink class sizes by half with 150% of their current funding?

In any case, schools clearly are a cheaper, safer, and better place to educate and care for children than dance studios or day cares. But it is what it is.
And on the "flip-side," we have $9,300 per student, per year. With 24 students per class, let's take a quick look at the math, here.

$9300 X 24 = $223,200 per class.

So, figure the teacher pulls down $60,000 (Salary + benefits.) Give or take.

Figure books, and other incidentals $16000 (Pulled # out of butt.) More or less.

The building is paid for, via bond. There's zero taxes paid on the whole school. They get parents to volunteer to paint the buildings every so often. Ok, maybe the district buys the paint, but I doubt it.

MGMT overhead (Board/Custodians/hookers/admin.)

So, that leaves approx. $147,200 per class.

WHERE'S THE MONEY?

WHO'S GOT THE MONEY?

Anyone seeing something WRONG here?

And this is just for 1, single classroom.

Whoops, forgot about school lunches. Figure $3.25/per day. ($585)
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