U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-03-2020, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
4,911 posts, read 2,258,013 times
Reputation: 6618

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
You had gym in kindergarten? What do kindergarteners do for gym? We didn't have gym, nor a cafeteria. We brought our own lunches, and ate out on the playground.
In my school, kindergarten "gym" consisted of silly activities, like pretending to be animals or adults' occupations. It was in the gymnasium, team-taught by our main teacher and the gym teacher. Proper gym classes, with jumping jacks and what-have-you, began in 1st grade; our main teacher was not involved. She still capitalized on that by calling stretch breaks in her classes "one minute of gym class".

Lunch was in the main cafeteria, but in a sequestered section with little kid-sized tables, not used by other grade levels, I think. Don't ask me how I remember; my long-term memory is allegedly very good.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-04-2020, 04:01 PM
 
4,288 posts, read 8,056,939 times
Reputation: 5288
When I was in second grade we switched for math and reading. Only two of the teachers were involved. I think it was just those two teachers trying to group the kids for easier teaching.



In fourth grade the class I started out with switched with another for math, but it was the entire class switching. (After a couple weeks I transfered into an "open classroom," where I stayed for the rest of elementary school.)


Seventh grade is when we really started switching. Six different classes, six different teachers, six different groups of kids.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2020, 04:07 PM
 
4,288 posts, read 8,056,939 times
Reputation: 5288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
You had gym in kindergarten? What do kindergarteners do for gym? We didn't have gym, nor a cafeteria. We brought our own lunches, and ate out on the playground.

9th grade was when we started switching classrooms.

My half-day kindergarten in Michigan had gym once/week. Every Thursday we put on our gym shoes, got in line, and walked (NO RUNNING!) to the gym. I'm sure we did a variety of activities, but the only one I remember is jumping rope. (Hold your hands low and twirl the rope, not your hands. Girls are allowed the little "skip" between jumps; boys are not.) I also remember seeing ropes hanging from the ceiling, but we little kids weren't allowed to climb them.

I remember my classroom teacher saying, "No running!" as we walked back to the classroom. I saw the boys trying to look like they were walking - arms stiff - and pondered what it was that made running, running.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2020, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
4,911 posts, read 2,258,013 times
Reputation: 6618
Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
I remember my classroom teacher saying, "No running!" as we walked back to the classroom. I saw the boys trying to look like they were walking - arms stiff - and pondered what it was that made running, running.
There's actually a scientific distinction between walking and running. In walking, at least one foot is in contact with the ground at all times, and the strides are usually no more than 2 feet. In running, both feet may leave the ground, and the strides are bigger. (Jogging is like a hybrid of the two: both feet leave the ground, but the strides are small.)

That's for humans. Four-legged animals have their own distinction, and horses have unique terms for land movement.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2020, 04:46 PM
 
408 posts, read 478,849 times
Reputation: 583
In the public school I attended for nine years, I went through K-8 with one main teacher, in one classroom, who taught all subjects, except for gym class, which was done in the gymnasium, with another teacher, for grades 1-8. We started off each school day by reciting the "Pledge of Allegiance" and by singing "American The Beautiful". There were no other switches until grade 9, when I attended a high school.

Last edited by glenninindy; 09-04-2020 at 05:04 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2020, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Colorado
19,647 posts, read 5,340,318 times
Reputation: 5962
7th grade....middle school..(only 7th & 8th grades)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2020, 03:58 AM
 
1,699 posts, read 1,526,807 times
Reputation: 1022
With the exception of Reading classes potentially, not until 5th grade for me.
I'd say it probably depends on your school and district. If you had a school that started earlier, they cared about quality of education and had more money to spend on catering teachers per strong subject area. State regulations are probably different in when certain grades have to have different subject area teachers. Personally, as an adult and former educator, I'd rather see me/kids have teachers by subject area because they will know what to focus on whether you're younger or older.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2020, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
4,911 posts, read 2,258,013 times
Reputation: 6618
Quote:
Originally Posted by chessimprov View Post
I'd say it probably depends on your school and district. If you had a school that started earlier, they cared about quality of education and had more money to spend on catering teachers per strong subject area. State regulations are probably different in when certain grades have to have different subject area teachers. Personally, as an adult and former educator, I'd rather see me/kids have teachers by subject area because they will know what to focus on whether you're younger or older.
This argument has two sides. The other side is that until a certain age, young kids are better off having one go-to person for most academic issues, and some personal ones too. Plus, kids don't yet have the skills to adapt to different teachers' personalities and teaching styles. It's a lot easier to adapt to a once-a-week specialty subject teacher (like music) than to a daily main subject teacher (like science). When is "certain age"? That's something school districts haven't figured out across the board, and the purpose of this thread.

On a more practical note, lower elementary school material is easy (for adults, that is), and there isn't much of it to begin with. A single teacher (known as a "generalist" or "elementary education") can handle learning all of it, and imparting it onto kids. But at a certain point, the volume and difficulty level of each subject simply becomes too much, and specialization becomes a necessity. Again, when is a "certain point" and what is "too much"? School districts' opinions vary.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 09-05-2020 at 07:00 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2020, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,025 posts, read 1,030,192 times
Reputation: 5252
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
For clarity's sake, I went to a K-thru-8 school, not the more common elementary school and middle school.

Kindergarten was its own self-contained classroom for almost everything, with its own restroom and even building entrance. Only the cafeteria space and gym class was shared with other grade levels.

Grades 1 thru 4 had one main teacher in the same classroom for all subjects, except for specialty classes like art, computing, and gym, which had their own classrooms and teachers. Grades 1 and 2 had the same teacher, and grades 3 and 4 had the same teacher. At one point in 4th grade, the school did a "5th grade practice day", where our day was a simulation of what was to come next year: we switched classrooms, although each teacher did funny educational games for their subject, and one teacher gave candy. (see next paragraph)

In grades 5 thru 8, proper switching of classrooms began. We went to our homeroom teacher at the start of the day for our first class, then switched classrooms for different subjects, both regular and specialty; then we'd return to our homeroom teacher for the last 15 minutes of the day, mostly to debrief about the day's events and pick up any paper handouts we were supposed to get. (Unfortunately, the teacher sometimes gave us homework she forgot to give in the morning.) The switching happened "as a team", with all classes being with the same set of kids. We had a different homeroom teacher each year, although the subject teachers remained the same.

In high school, I went to each of my classes on my own. Different classes had different sets of kids; I didn't go from class to class "as a team". Lunch was on your own too; if your friends didn't have the same lunch period as you, you were SOL, since eating lunch by yourself was frowned upon. You had to either brave it, or make do with a Snickers bar and a Coke.

What grade level did switching classrooms for different subjects start for other people on here?
I also went to a K-8 elementary school and we started switching classes for all subjects in 7th grade.....although we always had a special teacher for music and gym. Beginning in 7th grade, we moved as a class from subject to subject. We only split up when the girls went to Home Ec and the boys went to Shop.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2020, 07:35 AM
Status: "Uncomfortably numb" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
65,230 posts, read 61,346,166 times
Reputation: 79573
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
For clarity's sake, I went to a K-thru-8 school, not the more common elementary school and middle school.

Kindergarten was its own self-contained classroom for almost everything, with its own restroom and even building entrance. Only the cafeteria space and gym class was shared with other grade levels.

Grades 1 thru 4 had one main teacher in the same classroom for all subjects, except for specialty classes like art, computing, and gym, which had their own classrooms and teachers. Grades 1 and 2 had the same teacher, and grades 3 and 4 had the same teacher. At one point in 4th grade, the school did a "5th grade practice day", where our day was a simulation of what was to come next year: we switched classrooms, although each teacher did funny educational games for their subject, and one teacher gave candy. (see next paragraph)

In grades 5 thru 8, proper switching of classrooms began. We went to our homeroom teacher at the start of the day for our first class, then switched classrooms for different subjects, both regular and specialty; then we'd return to our homeroom teacher for the last 15 minutes of the day, mostly to debrief about the day's events and pick up any paper handouts we were supposed to get. (Unfortunately, the teacher sometimes gave us homework she forgot to give in the morning.) The switching happened "as a team", with all classes being with the same set of kids. We had a different homeroom teacher each year, although the subject teachers remained the same.

In high school, I went to each of my classes on my own. Different classes had different sets of kids; I didn't go from class to class "as a team". Lunch was on your own too; if your friends didn't have the same lunch period as you, you were SOL, since eating lunch by yourself was frowned upon. You had to either brave it, or make do with a Snickers bar and a Coke.

What grade level did switching classrooms for different subjects start for other people on here?
7th grade.

That's funny, I was just typing elsewhere about not having the middle-school setup in our system. I actually went to Kindergarten in a church building from which the town rented three classrooms while they put an addition onto the elementary school for the younger grades. It was the 1960s, and I guess the baby-boomer kids were crowding the schools.

But then from 1st to 3rd grade we went to the younger kids' elementary school, and from 4th to 6th to the other elementary school across the street, which was once the K - 9 school starting back in the 1920s.

For 7 through 12 we went to the Jr - Sr High School. Seventh grade is the year we started moving around from class to class.

Cultural history sidebar: I started 7th grade in 1970. That year was also the year that they changed the rules so that girls were allowed to wear pants to school. I think I wore a skirt on the first day and jeans for the next six years.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: //www.city-data.com/terms.html
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top