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Old 08-22-2020, 03:46 PM
 
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Why not have in person class one day every two weeks (10%) and virtual learning the other 90%? This gives people a chance to meet each other once in a while but keeps transmission chains broken because you're always apart for a full incubation period...
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Old 08-22-2020, 05:55 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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The incubation period is 14 days so every three weeks would be in the safe zone.

That might work just as a "nice to see you" but one thing I learned was that you need to get into a rhythm when teaching. That's why these block schedules really don't work well, especially when you have things like snow days. I'd think that going in would break that rhythm.

(words with only one letter that's sort of a vowel are strange)
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Old 08-22-2020, 09:28 PM
 
8,211 posts, read 4,637,665 times
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Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Why not have in person class one day every two weeks (10%) and virtual learning the other 90%? This gives people a chance to meet each other once in a while but keeps transmission chains broken because you're always apart for a full incubation period...
Only if they never go anywhere else and kids don't meet outside school.
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Old 08-23-2020, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Southern California
7,565 posts, read 9,277,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The incubation period is 14 days so every three weeks would be in the safe zone.

That might work just as a "nice to see you" but one thing I learned was that you need to get into a rhythm when teaching. That's why these block schedules really don't work well, especially when you have things like snow days. I'd think that going in would break that rhythm.

(words with only one letter that's sort of a vowel are strange)

I like every 3 weeks better too because of the incubation period.

Now regarding the rhythm of things, w/ COVID around, it's going to be tough & almost impossible, so I'd just make the in-person time be a time for asking questions or other unique circumstances that you can't really do remotely. So the teachers should tell the students to keep a running record of the TOP 3-5 questions ONLY to ask otherwise, we'd be there all week.

Things can't possibly be ideal until there's a vaccine or cure for COVID, otherwise, we all just have to do the best we can!
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Old 08-23-2020, 05:45 PM
 
1,476 posts, read 377,407 times
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100% impractical.

A nightmare for working parents.

I could go on, but....

OP are you a parent with school-aged kids?
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Old 08-24-2020, 07:07 AM
 
1,662 posts, read 1,501,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The incubation period is 14 days so every three weeks would be in the safe zone.

That might work just as a "nice to see you" but one thing I learned was that you need to get into a rhythm when teaching. That's why these block schedules really don't work well, especially when you have things like snow days. I'd think that going in would break that rhythm.

(words with only one letter that's sort of a vowel are strange)
Block scheduling works well for teachers that make interactive lessons or vary formats of learning. It can be very difficult to have to make every day like this. They can work, but traditional scheduling has a lot more flexibility. It used to be an education fad of how it was the "new thing" that "everyone had to do." Either can work but you have to have a good structure in place for block. Block is also not ideal for covid at all.
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Old 08-24-2020, 12:34 PM
 
6,200 posts, read 2,740,005 times
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Originally Posted by chessimprov View Post
Block scheduling works well for teachers that make interactive lessons or vary formats of learning. It can be very difficult to have to make every day like this. They can work, but traditional scheduling has a lot more flexibility. It used to be an education fad of how it was the "new thing" that "everyone had to do." Either can work but you have to have a good structure in place for block. Block is also not ideal for covid at all.
I was in a magnet program and we had block scheduling for all but my first year in the program. It was fine. I also did teaching in block (they just had 4 periods a semester) and it allowed for more innovative lesson planning than the more traditional schedules. Kids could also take more electives. It was problematic for some subjects like math though, because kids who took Algebra 1 in first semester freshman year and didn’t come back to math until 2nd semester sophomore year might end up forgetting a lot of what they had learned. My program had rotating block, which worked much better. We just had 2 periods together to get that longer class.
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Old 08-24-2020, 01:14 PM
 
6,309 posts, read 3,433,464 times
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Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Why not have in person class one day every two weeks (10%) and virtual learning the other 90%? This gives people a chance to meet each other once in a while but keeps transmission chains broken because you're always apart for a full incubation period...
How about if we just wait until it is safe enough. I compare covid with the bogeyman--you just don't know where it is hiding.
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Old 08-24-2020, 05:28 PM
 
1,662 posts, read 1,501,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
I was in a magnet program and we had block scheduling for all but my first year in the program. It was fine. I also did teaching in block (they just had 4 periods a semester) and it allowed for more innovative lesson planning than the more traditional schedules. Kids could also take more electives. It was problematic for some subjects like math though, because kids who took Algebra 1 in first semester freshman year and didn’t come back to math until 2nd semester sophomore year might end up forgetting a lot of what they had learned. My program had rotating block, which worked much better. We just had 2 periods together to get that longer class.
I'm not saying block can't be done, but it needs to be structured well. There are many cases where it's not.
In some districts, they just surprised teachers with the method like a week before and made them fend for themselves. Some students struggled because they couldn't complete certain course requirements (in a normal fashion) with the block scheduling changes. etc.

It's much easier to monitor smaller amounts of time and flexible. Block is simply a redistribution of time intervals by making bigger and fewer time intervals. When you have smaller intervals, you can more room to potentially move this class to this period or offer this class in multiple periods rather than one or fewer periods.

If kids could take more electives under block, it's because of how these electives were structured under a block scheduling. What is done in block scheduling can be done with 30-40 min time intervals as opposed to 60 or 90 min time intervals.

Block's advantage does allow lessons to be potentially deeper because one can focus one time on a particular class/subject. Also is hard to develop if you don't have things already in place.

I think most would agree that you wouldn't want shorter than a 30-40 minute time block though.
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Old 08-25-2020, 09:11 AM
 
11,501 posts, read 5,651,132 times
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Originally Posted by KemBro71 View Post
100% impractical.

A nightmare for working parents.

I could go on, but....

OP are you a parent with school-aged kids?
My thoughts exactly.

My kids are in week 2, and yes, they miss going to school. But what’s important now is safety and consistency.
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