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Old 09-26-2020, 09:01 AM
 
5,416 posts, read 4,680,702 times
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Some of the things that you mention are taught outside of schools, in small, specialty schools. Dancing, for one thing. the most you're going to find taught in a day school is square dancing, briefly, as part of the gym class. From what you describe, it sounds as if you're looking for the best of what you received in a school behind the Iron Curtain, combined with everything you wish you had learned, along with none of the worst you experienced. No school in the world will do this for you.

Remember, you want an education for your child that prepares him for college, but you also want him to be both physically and psychologically healthy. Achieving what you are seeking in a secondary school curriculum is unlikely to lead to psychological health.
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Old 09-26-2020, 09:20 AM
 
7 posts, read 864 times
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@Coney:
No, I am not a troll. I have two girls of about 1 year old. I can send you our photo if you want.

First of all, anything may be studied as a supplementary course, by selection. My curriculum includes only core courses. I studied in a musical school and I do not think that it is feasible to study an instrument as a core course. Same about painting.

I do not think that "every school graduate must know" philosophy, psychology, tennis or gymnastics. If a school includes any of them into its core curriculum, I would avoid it, because from my point of view it is literally wasting pupils' time and money. This just fails my "why"-test.

I do not know what "critical thinking" and "making good decisions" course might mean. I would assume that a school teaching something like this is pretty bad. Philosophy, for example, is a serious science at least. But what is "critical thinking"? This is what children learn both in and out school. It is ridiculous to teach this as a separate course. "Critical thinking" must start with acknowledging non-existence of god. Anyway, this kind of school is low-quality for me. I am looking for the opposite.

Last edited by cestx; 09-26-2020 at 09:22 AM.. Reason: typos
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Old 09-26-2020, 09:30 AM
 
7 posts, read 864 times
Reputation: 15
@nana053:
Thank you very much for your detailed comments! I greatly appreciate it.
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Old 09-26-2020, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
8,635 posts, read 7,808,993 times
Reputation: 9708
Quote:
Originally Posted by cestx View Post
@Coney:
No, I am not a troll. I have two girls of about 1 year old. I can send you our photo if you want.

First of all, anything may be studied as a supplementary course, by selection. My curriculum includes only core courses. I studied in a musical school and I do not think that it is feasible to study an instrument as a core course. Same about painting.

I do not think that "every school graduate must know" philosophy, psychology, tennis or gymnastics. If a school includes any of them into its core curriculum, I would avoid it, because from my point of view it is literally wasting pupils' time and money. This just fails my "why"-test.

I do not know what "critical thinking" and "making good decisions" course might mean. I would assume that a school teaching something like this is pretty bad. Philosophy, for example, is a serious science at least. But what is "critical thinking"? This is what children learn both in and out school. It is ridiculous to teach this as a separate course. "Critical thinking" must start with acknowledging non-existence of god. Anyway, this kind of school is low-quality for me. I am looking for the opposite.
Your list is unreasonably specific.
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Old 09-26-2020, 09:54 AM
 
3,716 posts, read 1,511,349 times
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The question that needs to be asked is why? If your children have this education what will the benefit to them be? Is it your ambition that they become political leaders or corporate presidents? Would that bring them happiness more than having a comfortable life and family and the time to enjoy them? Education doesn't prepare you for that. Education doesn't even prepare you to succeed at work. The diploma is just a passport to a job. Everything pertinent to a job is learned on the job, in every field. Education just sharpens a person's ability to solve problems, pass exams, deal with deadlines, survive difficult teachers and subjects, stick it out. The content is not all that important. The diploma is, as you are handicapped without it. 95% of everything learned in school is forgotten or irrelevant to making a living or a life. The ability to do well in any field relies on a person's ability to manage relationships with bosses, peers and subordinates. Education doesn't prepare you for that. In fact rising in the ranks past a certain point in any field is more a question of politics than job knowledge or expertise. One thing I found out as a parent and grandparent is that none of my children and grandchildren share my own interests, talents and ambitions. Everyone has to find their own way in life. They can't be programmed like a robot to satisfy someone else's ambitions.

Last edited by bobspez; 09-26-2020 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 09-26-2020, 10:05 AM
 
Location: USA
768 posts, read 208,000 times
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OP, my recommendation: private school.
Welcome to C-D.
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Old 09-26-2020, 11:06 AM
 
16,694 posts, read 19,278,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOldPuss View Post
OP, my recommendation: private school.
Welcome to C-D.
No private school teaches the curriculum he wants any more than a public school does. His curriculum is too wide and very little of it really will be taught at all.
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Old 09-26-2020, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Tucson
249 posts, read 186,136 times
Reputation: 732
OP, as others have told you, you won't find any school in the United States that teaches atheism. I say this as an atheist, myself. That really needs to come either from home or from self. I was raised Catholic and became an atheist independently while attending a public grammar school in the 1970s, when religious Christmas songs were a regular part of in-school holiday program. I felt sorry for my Jewish schoolmates.


Are you wealthy? Likely the only way you can achieve what you want is to hire private tutors.
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Old 09-27-2020, 02:25 PM
 
2,394 posts, read 997,882 times
Reputation: 2414
Most of the top privates in nyc offer that curriculum.
Here is the link to one of the all girls schools,
https://www.brearley.org/academics/u...ool/curriculum
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Old 09-27-2020, 02:49 PM
 
3,716 posts, read 1,511,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foodyum View Post
Most of the top privates in nyc offer that curriculum.
Here is the link to one of the all girls schools,
https://www.brearley.org/academics/u...ool/curriculum
$54,000 per year tuition. Plus costs for travel study and class trips to China, India, UK, France, Japan, etc., to round out their high school experience. Then off to private colleges for another $250 to $300K in educational expenses. That's a million for the OP's two daughters in today's dollars. Probably $10 million by the time they are finished college. Then most will enter the job market and get the same jobs that all their public high school and public university graduate co workers got, at 1/10th the cost.

Last edited by bobspez; 09-27-2020 at 03:12 PM..
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