Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-07-2021, 07:08 AM
 
29,755 posts, read 11,363,822 times
Reputation: 18314

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Why would anyone want someone who didn't do well in school to be working on their plumbing or electrical system? Those are not specialties for simpletons or the lazy. There's a lot of math involved in the electrician trade and construction in general.

I bought a van last year from a family in OKC. They have a plumbing business and had a 10 acre ranch with two very large newer homes on it. One was the parents and the other son's family. They had a fleet of vans but sold one because they rarely used it. My guess is they were making an income equal to a doctor or lawyer or perhaps more.


To get into those lines of work and excel to the point you own a electrical or plumbing business you have to be pretty bright. But there is a stigma to blue collar work by white collar people. You are not sitting behind a desk you are out working with your hands in the elements working hard. And some of the lower level workers may not be the best and brightest. But they are not running the show. Just doing what they are told.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-07-2021, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Austin
15,573 posts, read 10,279,647 times
Reputation: 19339
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
Is he doing the labor himself, or does he have handymen do it? Handymen that may be illegal migrants. How much do you think the people doing the work are actually making?
My master plumber does all the plumbing work himself. He has other employees who pull city permits, schedule work, etc. He is a self-employed owner of his plumbing company. He has no "illegal migrants" working for him that i have ever seen during the years I've employed him. He did have a younger plumber working with him on the last job, but the helper did none of the actual plumbing work. It was a pretty big plumbing job.

I had to wait a week and a half for him to come to our home to give us an estimate on the job and another week and a half to schedule us in to do the plumbing job.

He is always busy!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 11:33 AM
 
16,979 posts, read 21,613,699 times
Reputation: 29052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oklazona Bound View Post


To get into those lines of work and excel to the point you own a electrical or plumbing business you have to be pretty bright. But there is a stigma to blue collar work by white collar people. You are not sitting behind a desk you are out working with your hands in the elements working hard. And some of the lower level workers may not be the best and brightest. But they are not running the show. Just doing what they are told.
This is true of many trades HVAC, plumbing, electrical......... Unlike some other trades that are directly tied to new construction (boom/bust depending on demand) the core trades can stay busy year round.

Not all tradesman can successfully run a business, it is a totally separate responsibility. I used a guy years back to do some excavation work on my property. Great guy, could run that machine with unbelievable accuracy/technique. Money was rolling in, he bought literally everything he could possibly want from fast cars to big diesel trucks, fancy RV's to new excavation equipment. Economy slowed, he suddenly wasn't busy as he once was and he couldn't pay for all that "stuff." He went from top of the world to bust in less than 3 years.

He is still doing excavation work today, just now he works for someone else and just takes home a nice paycheck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
10,002 posts, read 7,139,323 times
Reputation: 17096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oklazona Bound View Post
I bought a van last year from a family in OKC. They have a plumbing business and had a 10 acre ranch with two very large newer homes on it. One was the parents and the other son's family. They had a fleet of vans but sold one because they rarely used it. My guess is they were making an income equal to a doctor or lawyer or perhaps more.


To get into those lines of work and excel to the point you own a electrical or plumbing business you have to be pretty bright. But there is a stigma to blue collar work by white collar people. You are not sitting behind a desk you are out working with your hands in the elements working hard. And some of the lower level workers may not be the best and brightest. But they are not running the show. Just doing what they are told.
I would like real-world examples of this supposed stigma. It's something I read about on the internet but rarely if ever heard anyone in real life put these people down, except when they think they messed up a job at their house and/or charged too much money for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 12:15 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,341,956 times
Reputation: 2986
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
This is true of many trades HVAC, plumbing, electrical......... Unlike some other trades that are directly tied to new construction (boom/bust depending on demand) the core trades can stay busy year round.

Not all tradesman can successfully run a business, it is a totally separate responsibility. I used a guy years back to do some excavation work on my property. Great guy, could run that machine with unbelievable accuracy/technique. Money was rolling in, he bought literally everything he could possibly want from fast cars to big diesel trucks, fancy RV's to new excavation equipment. Economy slowed, he suddenly wasn't busy as he once was and he couldn't pay for all that "stuff." He went from top of the world to bust in less than 3 years.

He is still doing excavation work today, just now he works for someone else and just takes home a nice paycheck.

Agreed, talent and financial skills are not mutually linked. Many people, regardless of whether they work in the trades or not, struggle with the ability to independently monetize their talents, gifts, and skills. Or if they do, they struggle with the ability to maintain those financial gains over the long term.

Nikola Tesla and Winston Churchill comes to mind. Although in Tesla’s case, it was probably not even a priority as he was more of a dreamer than the practicalist.

It could be argued that society needs spendthrifts like you mentioned, because their constant need for money due to their precarious financial position fuels their work and productivity. (Best done legally and ethically.)

Last edited by mingna; 04-07-2021 at 12:35 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 04:21 PM
 
29,755 posts, read 11,363,822 times
Reputation: 18314
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
This is true of many trades HVAC, plumbing, electrical......... Unlike some other trades that are directly tied to new construction (boom/bust depending on demand) the core trades can stay busy year round.

Not all tradesman can successfully run a business, it is a totally separate responsibility. I used a guy years back to do some excavation work on my property. Great guy, could run that machine with unbelievable accuracy/technique. Money was rolling in, he bought literally everything he could possibly want from fast cars to big diesel trucks, fancy RV's to new excavation equipment. Economy slowed, he suddenly wasn't busy as he once was and he couldn't pay for all that "stuff." He went from top of the world to bust in less than 3 years.

He is still doing excavation work today, just now he works for someone else and just takes home a nice paycheck.

Not to stereotype construction workers but I have hired a lot of freelance ones for my projects. And again these are people for whatever reason never had their own successful construction business but the drug and alcohol abuse among them is quite high. Perhaps that is the reason they are taking fairly low paying freelance jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 04:22 PM
 
29,755 posts, read 11,363,822 times
Reputation: 18314
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
I would like real-world examples of this supposed stigma. It's something I read about on the internet but rarely if ever heard anyone in real life put these people down, except when they think they messed up a job at their house and/or charged too much money for it.

A lot of my educated friends who have well paying blue collar jobs look down on tradespeople. Just my own personal experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 06:56 PM
Status: "I'm turquoise happy!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
23,863 posts, read 32,125,181 times
Reputation: 67708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingo Gibby View Post
So, why aren't you a plumber instead of whatever it is you do to earn money?
Plus 1.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 08:01 PM
 
Location: In a George Strait Song
9,545 posts, read 7,002,302 times
Reputation: 14045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingo Gibby View Post
So, why aren't you a plumber instead of whatever it is you do to earn money?
Not everyone is mechanically inclined or skilled. Isn’t this obvious?

I was a teacher (professor)...my husband can’t teach to save his life. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses and that is what makes the world go round.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2021, 10:57 PM
 
1 posts, read 631 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportslover View Post
People act like working in a trade is the greatest job in the world. Then why do so few people want to do it then? Why doesn’t society push going into trade school rather than going into college ?


So few work in it because so few know how to or brainwashed into believing it would be beneath them to work in a trade. Back in the day people were taught trades in School . But, then those classes were removed and everyone was told you had to go to College to make good money. Meanwhile the people who continued to go into trades and have their own businesses are the ones making the money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:58 AM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top