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Old 10-31-2022, 09:21 AM
 
1,912 posts, read 1,127,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
The fact that most of the GOP leadership, including Ron DeSantis and the Orange Lord himself, have degrees from Ivy schools should tell you that they know what they're talking about, regarding the Ivy's being Leftist.

That being said, there is a longstanding tradition of house workers being resented by field workers. That did not start with the MAGA movement, and it won't end after the MAGA movement gives way to the next movement.
The Ivies have left-leaning student bodies, faculty and staff and programming, but they also have active right-leaning students, groups and classes, even though they’re in a minority.

So what? Government shouldn’t be targeting people for their political views.
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Old 10-31-2022, 12:28 PM
 
19,777 posts, read 18,064,624 times
Reputation: 17262
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
The fact that most of the GOP leadership, including Ron DeSantis and the Orange Lord himself, have degrees from Ivy schools should tell you that they know what they're talking about, regarding the Ivy's being Leftist.

That being said, there is a longstanding tradition of house workers being resented by field workers. That did not start with the MAGA movement, and it won't end after the MAGA movement gives way to the next movement.
I think the other guy was more projecting than making a direct point. The fact is top dogs of both main parties tend to be very well educated and often, probably too often, lawyers.
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Old 10-31-2022, 12:39 PM
 
9,952 posts, read 6,668,342 times
Reputation: 19661
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
The fact that most of the GOP leadership, including Ron DeSantis and the Orange Lord himself, have degrees from Ivy schools should tell you that they know what they're talking about, regarding the Ivy's being Leftist.

That being said, there is a longstanding tradition of house workers being resented by field workers. That did not start with the MAGA movement, and it won't end after the MAGA movement gives way to the next movement.
? How can that be true if the ivies push out such a huge number of right leaning leaders? Now they may lean left, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t significant right-leaning groups at these schools. Amy Coney Barrett is the only SCOTUS justice who did not go to an Ivy League law school. They all manage to have no shortage of people vying to be their law clerks, most of whom also come from Ivy League schools. You have to have some pretty good professor references to get a law clerk role, which isn’t going to happen if you have professors who are not willing to refer you to right-leaning SCOTUS justices. I remember the controversy at Yale over a professor couple there steering female students toward clerkships with Justice Kavanaugh.

The reality is that the Ivy Leagues are an easy target. They are widely seen as a bastion of the elite and not accessible by most. That said, there is a variety in academia and certainly there are plenty of quality colleges that lean right or are more centrist. I think there’s been an even bigger backlash recently because southern schools were more likely to be open for business as usual during the pandemic instead of having only e-learning, which is a valid concern on multiple fronts. I spoke to someone recently who said her niece wanted to go to a school in the South but was not able to do so because there were no SAT/ACT offerings locally due to pandemic closures. Meanwhile, some schools in the South still required them even though not everyone could take them.
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Old 10-31-2022, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
8,055 posts, read 7,425,854 times
Reputation: 16314
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSPNative View Post
The Ivies have left-leaning student bodies, faculty and staff and programming, but they also have active right-leaning students, groups and classes, even though they’re in a minority.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
I think the other guy was more projecting than making a direct point. The fact is top dogs of both main parties tend to be very well educated and often, probably too often, lawyers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
? How can that be true if the ivies push out such a huge number of right leaning leaders? Now they may lean left, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t significant right-leaning groups at these schools. Amy Coney Barrett is the only SCOTUS justice who did not go to an Ivy League law school...
For me, the larger point with regard to the OP, is that field workers resent house workers, have done so throughout history (well, since houses were invented) and will continue to do so as long as we keep making history (and houses). It didn't just start happening in 2016.
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Old 10-31-2022, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
10,065 posts, read 7,232,760 times
Reputation: 17146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
A high school grad can easily do my job but will never get the job without a college degree. A college degree is largely just a "checkbox" for job seekers and employers, because as you mentioned, without the checkbox you don't know who the hell is going to try to apply for the job. I work with people who have degrees from any number of majors and schools.

Ironically, I've only been asked to submit my degree by an employer once (to be able to work in Germany), the other employers just didn't care.
Theoretically yes. But have you TRIED it?

When I did, it was an utter disaster.
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Old 10-31-2022, 08:26 PM
 
12,836 posts, read 9,037,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
A high school grad can easily do my job but will never get the job without a college degree. A college degree is largely just a "checkbox" for job seekers and employers, because as you mentioned, without the checkbox you don't know who the hell is going to try to apply for the job. I work with people who have degrees from any number of majors and schools.

Ironically, I've only been asked to submit my degree by an employer once (to be able to work in Germany), the other employers just didn't care.
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Theoretically yes. But have you TRIED it?

When I did, it was an utter disaster.
Need to emphasize that. I've tried. Heck I've even tried with folks with college degrees. But even leaving out the part that actually calls for a technical degree background, they couldn't do the non-technical portion of the job. Even the folks with non-technical college degrees have a difficult time or simply can't handle the complexity of the work. It's easier to take someone with a physics or engineering degree and teach them the systems thinking/project management skills than take someone with a non-technical degree or years of experience and teach them to do the job.

It's been rather frustrating because we've been trying to open up the non-technical jobs because hiring technical degree people is so competitive. The people with non-technical backgrounds can't even talk to the technical staff. It boggles the mind. It's like Penny trying to talk to Sheldon.
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Old 10-31-2022, 08:33 PM
 
6,985 posts, read 7,042,469 times
Reputation: 4357
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'm wondering how any students would know which of their grad school profs were liberal or conservative. Political affiliation and values of that affiliation isn't relevant to most topics being taught. In undergrad as well, we had no idea what the profs' political leanings were, and we didn't care. We were there to learn the details of whatever topic was being taught. Politics is irrelevant to science, languages and linguistics, music, STEM, etc.
Some areas of engineering, such as the one I'm in, are very political, so professors' political views were certain to come up. Some of them just blatantly mention their political views, regardless of whether or not it's relevant to the class. Some are well-known in certain circles, regardless of whether or not it's relevant to the class. And then there is also the question of what demographics do the professors favor. For example, a male STEM professor who blatantly favors women is likely to be liberal.
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Old 10-31-2022, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
8,055 posts, read 7,425,854 times
Reputation: 16314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'm wondering how any students would know which of their grad school profs were liberal or conservative. Political affiliation and values of that affiliation isn't relevant to most topics being taught. In undergrad as well, we had no idea what the profs' political leanings were, and we didn't care. We were there to learn the details of whatever topic was being taught. Politics is irrelevant to science, languages and linguistics, music, STEM, etc.
On the morning after the Orange Lord was elected in 2016, my son's Communications adjunct prof came storming into the classroom and announced something like "Well. We have just elected an insane person as President". So surprising them with an unexpected election result, is one way you can tell.
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Old 10-31-2022, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Earth
985 posts, read 540,012 times
Reputation: 2374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solere View Post
This is not a political post.

Recent media reports of government proposed student loan debt forgiveness in my opinion seem to have unleashed a lot of antipathy toward college educated people collectively.

When I have written persuasive letters in the past quoting professors and subject matter experts with higher education degrees, those with no college education would sometimes respond with a "What'er they know?" attitude" or "I ain't needin no professor" to tell me how I think" remark.

Has there for many years been an underlying antipathy toward the college educated from the non-college educated that was aggravated by the recently announced debt forgiveness plan?
Fixed it for you.
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Old 11-01-2022, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
24,605 posts, read 9,442,839 times
Reputation: 22945
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguard57 View Post
Theoretically yes. But have you TRIED it?

When I did, it was an utter disaster.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Need to emphasize that. I've tried.
Fair enough.
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