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Old 02-06-2008, 08:49 PM
 
578 posts, read 2,598,950 times
Reputation: 312

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaredCRS View Post
I have the utmost respect for anyone who has made it through court reporting school. It's something that requires much hard work and dedication. However, not everyone that has a passion for a career in court reporting is able to realize that dream. A natural alternative for such people is digital court reporting. Digital reporting utilizes many of the same skill sets taught to court reporters and DOESN'T COST ANYTHING TO GET STARTED. Digital reporters receive paid training (as apposed to paying to go to school), do not have to pay for their own equipment (it is provided by the company), and are able to start taking jobs in less than one month!

I manage the Florida office of Continental Reporting Service. CRS has been in business over 20 years and currently employs both court reporters and digital court reporters. Entry level Digital reporters make $20/hour. The digital reporting unit we use is vastly different from those that are hard-wired into court rooms. It is completely portable and is monitored by the reporter while he/she types time stamped notes throughout the deposition.

I am currently hiring digital reporters to work out of our Hollywood, FL office. Positions in Seattle, WA and other cities will soon be available.

Feel free to contact me @ Jared@CRSDeps.com to find out more about digital reporting or to inquire about how to become a digital reporter.

-Jared Sandel, Manager/Florida Operations

I am a court reporter who has worked in Washington state, and I am immensely curious as to how your "reporters" are going to pass the Washington CCR where no recording devices are allowed.....
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Old 02-07-2008, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Hollywood, FL
3 posts, read 33,690 times
Reputation: 11
Excellent question! We are certified by a different organization called the AAERT (American Association of Electronic Reporters and Transcribers). The quotations around the word reporter aren't necessary, we are legit. I understand your skepticism but keep in mind technology has always been a friend to court reporters. It wasn't too long ago that court reporters simply hand wrote shorthand notes and transcribed them manually. Furthermore, digital court reporting will not replace traditional court reporting anymore than maskers have.
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Old 03-16-2008, 05:37 PM
 
578 posts, read 2,598,950 times
Reputation: 312
My question was more specific. The Washington State certified court reporter exam does not allow recording. To work in Washington as a court reporter, you must pass the CCR. How are your people going to pass the CCR?

WA State Licensing: How to get yourcertificate - Court reporters

"How to get your certificate: Court reporters

You may not represent yourself as a court reporter without first getting a certificate in the state of Washington as required under RCW 18.145. Representing yourself as a court reporter includes adopting or using any title or description of services that incorporates one or more of the following terms: “shorthand reporter,” “court reporter,” “certified shorthand reporter,” or “certified court reporter.”
How to get your certificate

There are 4 ways to become a certified court reporter in the state of Washington:

* Pass the Washington State court reporter examination.
* Apply using the National Court Reporters Association designation.
* Apply using the National Stenomask Verbatim Reporters Association designation.
* Apply using reciprocity."
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Old 10-31-2008, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Hollywood, FL
3 posts, read 33,690 times
Reputation: 11
I never said we are "court reporters." We are digital reporters, and in the State of Washington we do not represent ourselves as "court reporters." In point of fact, we do not need to call ourselves "court reporters" to take depositions in the State of Washington.

The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure state that a deposition may be taken before "an officer authorized to administer oaths either by federal law or by the law in the place of examination; or a person appointed by the court where the action is pending to administer oaths and take testimony." All of our digital reporters are notaries public and therefore authorized to administer oaths.

Furthermore, it must be stipulated on the notice for a deposition to be taken in front of a digital reporter in the State of Washington. In Florida no such special notice is needed for a digital reporter to take a depo.

More information about our South Florida office specializing in digital reporting can be obtained on our new website: www.floridadepositions.com.

More information about digital/electronic reporting in general can be found at: www.AAERT.org.
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Old 09-11-2009, 05:48 PM
 
1 posts, read 8,597 times
Reputation: 25
DONT do court reporting in 2010, ladies. It's truly a waste of time, money and energy. You could be sitting for a BA in nursing, diagnostic sonographer, dental hygienist -- nurse educator -- lots of jobs now pay in the $60,000 range in 2010 with far less schooling and a more guaranteed success rate if you are tenacious. It's honestly a waste of your time...although the rip off schools will promise you the moon. Don't fall for it young ladies. Honestly in 2010, COURT REPORTING IS NOT A GOOD FIELD because it pays sporadically, it's expensive in school and software, it definitely takes the average person 5 years between speed building, realtime writing, legal, medical and english work, and there is no guarantee you will get through school. There is a 95% drop out rate, once you try and build your speed past 200. Something in the fingering about that -- I am not sure -- I have known girls taking two years or more to go from 190 to 210...It just happens, and then they just give up and have nothing to show for it -- no degree, no college credits, no career alternatives. I know one girl who eventually after 8 years in school, had to take a job as a phone operator to pay off the student loans. All this time, she could have spent in college and gotten a Master's Degree already!!. The rip off schools and instructors (who generally are there to keep their jobs because that's all they know -- no college degrees or other skills -- this keeps them employed) will only highlight the minute few that made it!!About 10, 15, even 9 years ago, yeah, it was worth it. It's not a good investment now, You walk away with nothing if you are not in the 5% success range -- no BA, no AA -- nothing for the 5, 6, 7 years spent. Not to mention you are competing with voicewriters, digital writers, recognition software AND budget cuts. Trust me, it's a serious waste of your time if you are looking for the money............Try healthcare, education, pharmacy school, etc. You will do much better AND get credit (college )for your efforts.I hope this TRUTHFUL evaluation helps..........not the sucker evaluations the minority of reporters give you (sure if you have been in the business 20 years, YOU will be fine). What about newcomers? They are screwed. DONT DO IT.Take care and please research the career thoroughly -- weigh the pros (very, very, few) against the cons in 2010 (of which there are many, many of them).

PLEASE PASS THIS INFORMATION ALONG TO ALL THE WANNA BE'S. If you love it, okay. If you THINK you will make money, please THINK again. Ask your career counselor, not the rip off schools who suck up your financial aid to stay employed, about what I've written --if it is not more truthful and honest then what the schools and "seasoned" reporters will tell you.

Last edited by DON1234; 09-11-2009 at 05:50 PM.. Reason: Wanted people to know the truth
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Old 10-03-2009, 02:51 PM
 
23 posts, read 118,531 times
Reputation: 29
I have been a freelance court reporter for almost six years, and I absolutely love it. I'm located in NJ. I make plenty of money, and I'm busy. I don't like to hear negativity about my profession. It is worth it to go to school, become licensed, and start a career in court reporting. It took me a year and a half to finish school, and I know I made an excellent career choice.

To anyone out there who is interested in court reporting, please ignore the negative comments. We are more in demand now than ever! Court reporters are not only used in depositions and courtrooms; we are also used in closed captioning on television and CART, which is used in schools for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

Court reporting is a rewarding career, and I hope anyone out there considering it will follow through.
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Old 04-12-2010, 03:42 PM
 
17 posts, read 122,026 times
Reputation: 22
Thanks for the encouragement, Stenoqueen. I've been investigating careers for months. I could point to a negative rant on a forum about every occupation out there! LOL
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Old 04-12-2010, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Ohio
1,561 posts, read 2,257,732 times
Reputation: 2508
pixieshmoo, any update since this thread was created?
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Old 07-11-2010, 01:41 PM
 
578 posts, read 2,598,950 times
Reputation: 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stenoqueen View Post
I have been a freelance court reporter for almost six years, and I absolutely love it. I'm located in NJ. I make plenty of money, and I'm busy. I don't like to hear negativity about my profession. It is worth it to go to school, become licensed, and start a career in court reporting. It took me a year and a half to finish school, and I know I made an excellent career choice.

To anyone out there who is interested in court reporting, please ignore the negative comments. We are more in demand now than ever! Court reporters are not only used in depositions and courtrooms; we are also used in closed captioning on television and CART, which is used in schools for deaf and hard-of-hearing students.

Court reporting is a rewarding career, and I hope anyone out there considering it will follow through.
I've been doing it for seven years, and everything she said is true. And reporting can be a six-figure career if you're willing to work hard. It's NOT easy, the training is intense and can be frustrating, but if one is determined enough to make it through, the payoff is wonderful.
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Old 08-05-2010, 11:08 PM
 
216 posts, read 444,356 times
Reputation: 189
I'm a former court reporter, so let me throw in my two cents to those of you on the fence.

Court Reporting has the possibility to be a great career depending on when you graduate and where you live. It takes a lot of determination and skill to make it through court reporting school, and it can take some good luck to make it into a career after that. Where I graduated from, it was taking students more than a year to find consistent work after passing their certification tests. I had to move 300 miles to the middle of nowhere to get good work after I graduated. Even then, I had months where I struggled to pay the bills. On the other hand, some months I made more money than I knew what to do with.

The truth is, mask reporters and digital reporters have the tools to do our job just as well as us, but they can be trained a heck of a lot easier, faster, and because of this, they will work cheaper. The only reason traditional stenotype court reporters aren't being pushed out yet is because of all the lobbying NCRA does to keep them in demand. It's a racket, folks. If you need further proof of this, look to states where there are the greatest shortages of court reporters. Tennessee, Florida, and so on have no problems hiring mask or digital reporters, and those reporters do just fine.

If you value things like consistent pay, benefits, paid vacations, and time off, look towards other career paths. The chances of you making it through school, getting certified, getting enough experience to become realtime and get a government job (which is the crux of court reporting jobs) is too slim to throw $30,000 plus at (which is a conservative, bottom line estimate of what it costs to become a reporter.)

Good luck at whatever you choose.
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