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Old 08-25-2023, 07:01 AM
 
16,893 posts, read 16,166,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NDak15 View Post
Apparently StealthRabbit's kids were farmers and entrepreneurs as teenagers. Also they didn't go to school based on some posts. His/her posts have more holes in them than Swiss cheese. Read about the free college his/her kids did as well.

It is ridiculous the shade thrown today. I think the Boomer attitude toward work is toxic in a lot of ways.
Maybe StealthRabbit really does know a couple of 24 year old college graduates with two small children and another baby on the way who have managed to build their own home with their bare hands while farming for their own food.

I have never seen anyone like that, myself, but more power to those that really exist.
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Old 08-25-2023, 07:59 AM
 
1,621 posts, read 820,832 times
Reputation: 2552
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I thought the bolded began with the Millennials. There were stories in the media about newly-graduated people asking for more starting pay, and expecting a promotion after every 6 months on the new job. Prior generations were happy to be able to get jobs at all; seems there was a recession every decade that made jobs scarce. The mentality among new grads generally was completely different.
I'm sure there stories, but those stories make headlines for a reason, "they are outside of the norm" and therefore headline grabbing. Either way it doesn't hurt to ask. After all you don't get what you deserve you get what you negotiate.
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Old 08-25-2023, 08:12 AM
 
Location: USA
2,852 posts, read 1,125,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
Just don't come crying to me in 30 yrs. when all the work to live types are broke, option-less and screaming for handouts.
They already are.
Being prepared for life after college involves parents who have expectations of their children. That starts early, and if parents coddle their children, make excuses for their laziness or failures, and do not encourage their independence, the result is young adults who have no clue how to live outside their comfortable bubble.
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Old 08-25-2023, 08:42 AM
 
16,893 posts, read 16,166,447 times
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When Covid hit 3 1/2 years ago, Gen Z was between the ages of 6-21, so the vast majority were still in K-12 or in college. Only a small percentage of Gen Z would have been college grads at that point in time.

Most of Gen Z who were working were in retail/restaurant jobs. They have a unique perspective of having had their schools shut down to keep them "safe" while also being deemed "essential workers" who had to report in person to their retail and food service jobs. Yet, they weren't supposed to be getting together with friends after work? Umm, right.

This group of recent college grads has actually done distance learning, in person learning AND worked in person jobs during Covid where they had to go through the extra steps designed to "keep people safe" - temperature checks when they reported to work, sanitizing surfaces at work, wearing masks all day, contactless delivery, etc. They've also experienced working once Covid protocols were lifted.

I think they bring a unique perspective to the table.
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Old 08-25-2023, 09:08 AM
 
16,893 posts, read 16,166,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOldPuss View Post
They already are.
Being prepared for life after college involves parents who have expectations of their children. That starts early, and if parents coddle their children, make excuses for their laziness or failures, and do not encourage their independence, the result is young adults who have no clue how to live outside their comfortable bubble.
I dare say that the parents who were inclined to coddle their children, really went over the top doing so during Covid. Those kids were stuck at home, forbidden to go out and see their friends or go to work. They stayed at home distance learning, playing video games and posting/watching videos on social media for two years straight...yep, those kids will be stunted in many regards.

Most parents did not sit on their kids like that - thank goodness!
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Old 08-25-2023, 09:44 AM
 
1,621 posts, read 820,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOldPuss View Post
They already are.
Being prepared for life after college involves parents who have expectations of their children. That starts early, and if parents coddle their children, make excuses for their laziness or failures, and do not encourage their independence, the result is young adults who have no clue how to live outside their comfortable bubble.
I'm confused, when did working to live become a recipe for going broke? Working to live doesn't mean blowing ones money. It simply means striving for a balance in life. Work isn't the end goal, but rather a means to an end.

As for coddled children, those will always be around. Parents take different approaches to child rendering and unsurprisingly society sees different outcomes.
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Old 08-25-2023, 09:46 AM
 
1,621 posts, read 820,832 times
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Artlicle on people complaining about lazy workers going back to the 1930s

https://www.newsweek.com/nobody-want...ad-old-1726774

As I stated earlier business owners have always complained about the upcoming generation of workers. It's just human nature to complain at this point.
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Old 08-25-2023, 11:33 AM
 
Location: North Dakota
10,232 posts, read 13,744,385 times
Reputation: 18023
Quote:
Originally Posted by springfieldva View Post
Maybe StealthRabbit really does know a couple of 24 year old college graduates with two small children and another baby on the way who have managed to build their own home with their bare hands while farming for their own food.

I have never seen anyone like that, myself, but more power to those that really exist.
I haven't heard that story yet.
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Old 08-25-2023, 11:48 AM
 
19,493 posts, read 17,723,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springfieldva View Post
I think that they must be talking about Mellennials. I've pointed out a couple of times that the absolute oldest Gen Z college grads would be 24 now. Are we to believe that 22-24 year old college grads, fresh from PT retail and restaurant jobs are the main new employees complaining about work/life balance? Most of the 22-24 year old college grads that I know are happy to be in professional positions and enjoying being out on their own in their first basic apartment or living with their parents for a bit until they can save up money to move out.

Gen Z ranges in age from 9-24.

The first Zoomers were born on Jan. 1, 1997.
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Old 08-25-2023, 11:54 AM
 
Location: A coal patch in Pennsyltucky
10,250 posts, read 10,502,306 times
Reputation: 12547
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post

Fewer kids are working FT before college, so they know little about what is expected of a FT employee. (I don't consider food service / grunt jobs requiring no intellectual or 'task-value-add' responsibilty as preparing anyone for a career / job / employment with major responsibility or commitment). Yes... a grunt worker may need to SHOW UP, but that doesn't equal, "You are responsible for the success of this business, and the safety of other employees, and driving company vehicles, operating equipment that could kill others, dealing with commercial accts..." It's a no starter.
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I don't know what timeframe you're talking about, but I graduated from high school in 1973. Jobs were extremely difficult to find when I was in HS and college. I delivered newspapers and worked at a Boy Scout camp for $20 a week when I was 16. The pay increased $5/week the second year. After HS, I drove 40 miles around my to put applications in factories, steel mills and anything else I could find. Never got a call back.

Fast forward to today. I'm in schools everyday and hear many HS students talking about where they work. There are many HS students working part-time and they have no problem changing jobs if they are not happy. I have had several students leave school early for jobs. I've seen students working two or more part-time jobs, and one boy with his own remodeling/roofing business.

Quote:
Originally Posted by springfieldva View Post
Physical schools were closed for a year, even two in some states. Covid closures were being billed as our "new normal". You seriously think that teaching majors delayed graduating from college due to those policies?

Like I said, I don't know how things worked with student teaching during that unprecedented time but it stands to reason that at least a certain percentage of students were unable to student teach at the physical schools.

Blaming them for the school closures is not fair.
Schools in my area shut down In March of 2000 and did not open up again that school year. They were open most of the 2000-2021 school year. I was a long term sub in two different school districts and we were in school most of the time with students having the option to be online.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
But even back in the 70's, a BA wasn't a guarantee of a living wage. One still had to get an MA, AKA a "professional degree" or law school or whatever, to get something above an office admin job, or a grunt lab job (though one that payed decently) for science majors, and the like. Entry-level stuff. And even those were scarce. There was some kind of federal incentive program going on, that compensated employers for hiring new college grads for what were still called secretarial/office assistant jobs at the time. New grads considered themselves lucky to get one. There was a recession happening, due in part to the oil embargo.
I started working in the business world in the late 1970s. A master's degree was not considered very important. I was a consultant in a Big 6 accounting firm. They actually frowned on people going back to school for an MBA, etc. Some people wanted to get an MBA and the partner I worked for told them, "You had enough education when you were hired or we wouldn't have hired you."
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