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Old 08-25-2023, 11:55 AM
 
19,495 posts, read 17,734,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheOldPuss View Post
They already are.
Being prepared for life after college involves parents who have expectations of their children. That starts early, and if parents coddle their children, make excuses for their laziness or failures, and do not encourage their independence, the result is young adults who have no clue how to live outside their comfortable bubble.
Bravo.
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Old 08-25-2023, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Arizona
2,548 posts, read 2,193,792 times
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Wouldn't be surprised if another pandemic comes along and throws a monkey wrench into society - again.
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Old 08-26-2023, 01:51 AM
 
8,275 posts, read 3,756,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
Wouldn't be surprised if another pandemic comes along and throws a monkey wrench into society - again.
Statistically, it will happen.... eventually.
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Old 08-26-2023, 01:54 AM
 
8,275 posts, read 3,756,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
I don't really put much stock in blanket assessments, although a questionable reputation sometimes takes on a life of it's own:

"A survey found that 40% of business leaders thought Gen Z grads were unprepared for the workplace.

Of that subset, 94% of respondents said they had avoided hiring recent college graduates.

And 88% of the subset said "etiquette classes" could help graduates transition to post-college jobs."


https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/care...b4bc1908&ei=46
It's a strange assessment. Universities don't teach workplace preparation. Business leaders are responsible for teaching junior employees how to effectively operate in a business environment. Even a business administration program... while providing the tools to succeed... don't provide experience to succeed on the first try without guidance.
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Old 08-26-2023, 09:15 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,060 posts, read 106,950,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I started working in the business world in the late 1970s. A master's degree was not considered very important. I was a consultant in a Big 6 accounting firm. They actually frowned on people going back to school for an MBA, etc. Some people wanted to get an MBA and the partner I worked for told them, "You had enough education when you were hired or we wouldn't have hired you."
STEM wins the day! You got a very practical degree. Just curious, though; what level degree did the partner lording it over you guys have? Mr. "You have enough education" and his peers at your workplace?
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Old 08-26-2023, 10:36 AM
 
Location: A coal patch in Pennsyltucky
10,269 posts, read 10,508,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
STEM wins the day! You got a very practical degree. Just curious, though; what level degree did the partner lording it over you guys have? Mr. "You have enough education" and his peers at your workplace?
I'm not sure. If he was hired as an auditor, he likely had a BS in accounting. If he was hired as a consultant, he likely had an MBA. For most people in audit or consulting, it was difficult to enroll in grad school since you didn't know what your schedule would be or where you would be traveling. I once spent 14 months on an out of state engagement.
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Old 08-26-2023, 06:54 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
44,919 posts, read 59,916,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slater View Post
I've occasionally talked to folks who, upon being newly hired, said that they were told "Forget what you learned in school. That's not the way we do it here. You'll be trained."

I would imagine that's not very common but it does happen.
That was the way it was when I was in industry, especially for accountants.
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Old 08-27-2023, 04:47 AM
 
18,485 posts, read 15,438,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Since when has USA college (?) prepared a graduate for the workplace? USA college and profs are pretty clueless about the 'workplace', as are the students.


welcome to the 'new normal' (entitlements)


Yes, education is in trouble, and I trust the outcome will only improve educational opportunities. Covid was the once / century chance for USA edu to get it together, They failed. Opportunity lost.



With age 26 (healthcare, and car insurance paid by parents up until that age.)
being yesteryears' age 18... (voting, military, financially and legally self sufficient)

Expect immaturity in young adults.

Fewer kids are working FT before college, so they know little about what is expected of a FT employee. (I don't consider food service / grunt jobs requiring no intellectual or 'task-value-add' responsibilty as preparing anyone for a career / job / employment with major responsibility or commitment). Yes... a grunt worker may need to SHOW UP, but that doesn't equal, "You are responsible for the success of this business, and the safety of other employees, and driving company vehicles, operating equipment that could kill others, dealing with commercial accts..." It's a no starter.

Recent hires are very difficult to get up to speed. Employers should get a 'training credit' simiar to hiring ex-cons (who are usually much harder workers, and certainly more responsible and committed than USA college grads).

Green Card / immigrant grads... far better than USA grads, and with adequate incentive to WORK and stay employed.

vs...
Business leaders who responded to Intelligent's survey said Gen Z grads had negative traits, including a poor work ethic, sub-par communication skills, and a sense of entitlement.
I am 110% with you on the "training credit". The problem is that companies are not allowed to value "human capital" as a financial asset within their accounting framework (usually GAAP), so there is effectively an enormous barrier to corporate executives attempting to justify "investing" in training.

I think the economy would be much more robust if training, apprenticeships and part-time jobs were as available in the white collar world as they are in the blue collar world. This would remove a lot of barriers for many people trying to get started or to change careers, I suspect.
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Old 08-27-2023, 09:43 AM
 
Location: NMB, SC
41,760 posts, read 17,335,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
I am 110% with you on the "training credit". The problem is that companies are not allowed to value "human capital" as a financial asset within their accounting framework (usually GAAP), so there is effectively an enormous barrier to corporate executives attempting to justify "investing" in training.

I think the economy would be much more robust if training, apprenticeships and part-time jobs were as available in the white collar world as they are in the blue collar world. This would remove a lot of barriers for many people trying to get started or to change careers, I suspect.
They still are as internships in college. I went to college and had a full semester working part time at a tech company. And it was one credit and a grade. And the company paid me as well. They don't do that anymore but there are still unpaid internships students can get through their college.
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Old 08-27-2023, 10:17 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,578 posts, read 57,526,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
They still are as internships in college....They don't do that anymore but there are still unpaid internships students can get through their college.
Be careful, you might get what you paid for.

Our Fortune 50 still does extensive well paid summer hire program, but few internships during school year. Unfortunately, the summer program has eroded to a childish and attractive summer camp experience. There are several mandatory events planned per week, making it nearly impossible to get the concentrated time to complete meaningful tasks. Also, the culmination is a graded and award centric poster fair, just like elementary school. Quite a disservice to the intensely diligent potential workers, but very rewarding to those who float to the top via circus acts of jumping through meaningless hoops.(similar to school and sports... and future annual evaluations by adolescent managers).

I've always had excellent interns, who have learned and delivered high value contributions. (But not won the blue ribbons at poster fair). They've all been on the job offer list, but the really good performers seek meaningful employment at companies who value their skills and capabilities.

The alternative.... Get a job! Grow through the organization while the company pays for your college.

Or

Attend college overseas, where you may be required to have a sponsoring employer during the last 2 yrs of college. Your courses, and schedule are integrated with your employer and their processes and equipment, you must reach validated skill and proficiency before issued a diploma. Your first day at work, after graduation.... You are already trained and capable of using company software, tools, processes, and procedures. You can change employment if you desire, but usually stay for a yr. Regardless, you already have had ~2 yrs of related and relevant experience by the time you graduate.
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