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Old 11-13-2023, 02:17 PM
 
12,836 posts, read 9,029,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Do you assume everyone was "bored out of their minds" before cell phones? Heaven forbid they should just sit with their thoughts for two seconds!
Of course. Kids were cutting up back then as well. The difference wasn't cell phones but teacher authority. We didn't have cell phones but kids talked. They passed notes. They played football with folded up paper. The threw things at each other (spit wads, paper wads, etc). They chewed gum and stuck it under desks if they were feeling good and on the seat for the next person to sit in if they were feeling mischievous. A favorite game was to wait until the teacher turned toward the board and toss a mini football around and then hide it when the teacher turned around. Every once in a while, the teacher would get mad and turn around and throw an eraser at the kids in the back of the room. One teacher was perfect at it -- throw a big, chalk dust loaded, eraser and hit the desk top right in the middle of a group of kids so engrossed in chatting they didn't see him turn around. Covered them all in a big cloud of chalk dust.

So no, kids were never little angels sitting quietly with their thoughts. Not today. Not when we were kids. Not when our parents were kids. The big difference today is the teacher can't throw an eraser into the crowd. Phones are just the easy thing to blame for the problem rather than actually addressing the discipline problem. If you have discipline, you don't have a phone problem to start with.
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Old 11-13-2023, 02:36 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
43,059 posts, read 18,223,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
OK. Regardless, we've moved on. Parents have moved on. Punish the behaviors if needed. Punish those who exhibit bad behavior, not everyone because someone might do something. If someone learns the subject and isn't bothering anyone else, what difference does it make if they are texting on their phone or sitting their bored out of their mind so long as they aren't disturbing anyone else?

If they have the phone out talking, well isn't that already an issue, regardless of phone? If they are playing a game beeping and booping and making noise, is that any different than playing football with a piece of paper and disturbing others? What can they do with a phone that disturbs the class that isn't already covered under another rule. Perhaps just enforce the rules that matter rather than making up more rules to enforce.
So you just pick the lesser of the poison....
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Old 11-13-2023, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,766 posts, read 24,261,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilacsnlocks View Post
If the phones in school could only be used for making calls and recording video and did not have internet that would be a perfect compromise. We need to normalize a different kind of phone that does not have internet or apps. I guess Gabb Phone is one such product. And we need to make it shameful and culturally unacceptable for parents to give their kids unrestricted, unsupervised access to internet and social media. There is no reason a kid needs to have the same type of phone an adult has.
Once solution -- no cell phones in classrooms. Instead each classroom has x number of school-centered-owned tablets.
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Old 11-13-2023, 05:29 PM
 
179 posts, read 271,838 times
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I can tell you right now that most of the biggest phone culprits in my school are not students who are doing well in or even passing classes. However, even students who are okay or above average students resort to the distractions of phones, and their performance does suffer as a result. If an institution purports to be a place of learning, I don't believe that minors should be given the chance to access a tool that takes away from learning.
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Old 11-13-2023, 05:34 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
45,336 posts, read 60,512,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creo View Post
I can tell you right now that most of the biggest phone culprits in my school are not students who are doing well in or even passing classes. However, even students who are okay or above average students resort to the distractions of phones, and their performance does suffer as a result. If an institution purports to be a place of learning, I don't believe that minors should be given the chance to access a tool that takes away from learning.
On the other hand you have those who demand that the students have phones because then they don't need teachers or books or even classes. Everything they need to know they can access via the internet and YouTube.

I think I mentioned earlier that some schools have played the "don't need class sets of calculators" game because phones have a calculator.
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Old 11-13-2023, 05:54 PM
 
Location: az
13,690 posts, read 7,976,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
behind a paywall... can't read
Some highlights...

Quote:
We should know this by now. In 2018, a secondary school in Ireland decided to ban cellphones altogether. The result: a significant increase in student face-to-face social interactions. “It’s hard to measure, but we find the place has a happier atmosphere for everyone,” one administrator told The Irish Times.

It’s not the school’s job to police kids’ phone habits, something parents are acutely aware isn’t easy. And that gets to the thorny crux of the issue: Parents are often the problem. When one group of parents in my district confronted the administration about its lax policy toward cellphones, the principal said whenever he raised the issue, parents were the ones who complained. How would they reach their children?

But if we expect our kids to comply with no-phones policies, we’ve got to get over the deprivation. Our own parents would just call the front office — in an emergency. Not because they wanted to make sure we remembered to walk the dog.

And really, if we’re trying to teach kids to be safe, responsible and independent, shouldn’t we give them the leeway to do so? Phones don’t teach kids these values; parents do.

For schools to enact what research overwhelmingly shows benefits students, we parents have to back them up. When parents say our kids are the ones with the cellphone problem, we’re just kidding ourselves.
https://www.nytimes.com/2023/11/09/o...ban-teens.html
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Old 11-13-2023, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Honolulu/DMV Area/NYC
30,612 posts, read 18,192,641 times
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I think there's a balance to be had. Banning cell phones completely in schools when many students are traveling significant distances to and from school (as I did in NYC for high school where my commute was 40-50 minutes each way via bus and subway) is a recipe for disaster and just not very smart, especially in an era where payphones aren't really a thing. Despite my school's prohibitions against cell phones, us students still brought them in. But the NYC department of education would institute random scanning where they'd send metal detectors to schools at random for a few days a week (several times a year). During these random scanning days/weeks, students were paying the bodega owners $5 a day to hold onto their phones until the school day let out.

My high school (student body size of 4,000) also didn't have individual lockers (just gym lockers, which would only be used during daily PE classes).

Ban their use (and confiscate as contraband until the end of the school day like you'd do for any other non-illicit contraband), but don't ban from school is my two cents.
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Old 11-13-2023, 06:34 PM
 
12,836 posts, read 9,029,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
So you just pick the lesser of the poison....
How is addressing the actual problem -- talking, noise, disruption, etc the lesser? To me banning phones is like a lot of other school solutions to problems -- the zero tolerance rules. One size fits none, punishment doesn't fit the crime, but easy for administrators to justify: "Had no choice; zero tolerance policy; just following orders." Just like the no fighting rule punishes the victim as much or more than the perpetrator.
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Old 11-13-2023, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,766 posts, read 24,261,465 times
Reputation: 32905
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
How is addressing the actual problem -- talking, noise, disruption, etc the lesser? To me banning phones is like a lot of other school solutions to problems -- the zero tolerance rules. One size fits none, punishment doesn't fit the crime, but easy for administrators to justify: "Had no choice; zero tolerance policy; just following orders." Just like the no fighting rule punishes the victim as much or more than the perpetrator.
Wrong again. Most principals (and me) in my district heartily disliked zero tolerance.
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Old 11-14-2023, 06:43 AM
 
12,836 posts, read 9,029,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Wrong again. Most principals (and me) in my district heartily disliked zero tolerance.
Ok, then, do you agree with dealing with the individual behavior or do you support a blanket policy of just banning cell phones?
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