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Old 11-29-2023, 10:32 AM
 
6,985 posts, read 7,039,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalUID View Post
That's not at all uncommon.

A lot of people pursue something "practical" even if they don't necessarily care for it or have a passion for it. Sometimes this is pushed on them by their parents. Just ask 80% of accounting majors.
Yes, but there isn't just one practical major in the world. If somebody isn't interested in accounting, there are other practical majors. I can see a parent pushing a kid into a practical major if the parent is paying the bill, but it makes no sense to push a kid into one specific major if there is zero interest.
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Old 11-29-2023, 10:46 AM
 
Location: In your head
1,075 posts, read 552,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
Yes, but there isn't just one practical major in the world. If somebody isn't interested in accounting, there are other practical majors. I can see a parent pushing a kid into a practical major if the parent is paying the bill, but it makes no sense to push a kid into one specific major if there is zero interest.
I'd argue that most majors can be made practical under the right circumstances or in the right environment. Even English Lit majors are valuable in areas of the business where communicating a strong message is important. Many corporate legal departments are composed of both attorneys and a plethora of liberal arts majors who work beside them. One of our Ops managers has a BFA. Our former director had a BA in English. These can be valuable backgrounds in areas of the business that require a lot of writing, communication, and putting together presentation materials. Most engineers or accountants sure as hell don't want to do this type of work.

When people say how they can't fathom what one does with one of these degrees, I just assume they've had very little experience working in Corporate America, at large companies, or at many different organizations at all. In nearly two decades of experience, I've worked alongside with all sorts of pedigrees and backgrounds (many of which were in the liberal arts, fine arts, and social sciences, too). If you are deeply passionate about writing or communications, then you can certainly make a career out of that. Probably not at Mom&Pop Plumbing Co., but somewhere like Amazon, Meta, JPMorgan Chase, Deloitte, or any other organization that has a plethora of departments and talent needs.

Last edited by digitalUID; 11-29-2023 at 11:00 AM..
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Old 11-29-2023, 11:08 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,687 posts, read 57,985,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
Yes, but there isn't just one practical major in the world. If somebody isn't interested in accounting, there are other practical majors. I can see a parent pushing a kid into a practical major if the parent is paying the bill, but it makes no sense to push a kid into one specific major if there is zero interest.
Some pressure is implied, some is real (Alma mater, family business, family legacy..)

Nothing is going to stop parental / peer pressure until we equip confident and capable kids (parents, school, society all play a role)

Some situations cannot be changed (family / location), so you cope.... And get out when you have the guts and resources to do so.

Parents/ family paying for higher education, causes the weak to comply, tho they could choose a different path if they were capable.

Getting youth exposed and equipped to make life choices can accelerate the process of growing up. (Including edu and career choices).

Coddling, sheltering, avoiding challenges, choices, and commitments delays purposeful maturity. Many nations mediate that by mandatory conscription. +/- USA is very keen on 'sheltering' / protecting young adults.

When you travel the world, you find thousands of international youth traveling / living in foreign countries, but very few Americans. They are home wasting their ripe formative, adventurous yrs, following the crowd / cultural expectation of 'college bound'. Taking that path without substantial objectives, is just continuing the failed K-12 'average' path, leading to 'average' (declining) progress.

We need leaders. They are not typically found among followers. (USA edu system)
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Old 11-29-2023, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
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^A significant US population base is isolationist and want nothing to do with leaders and potential leaders who are "worldly."
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Old 11-29-2023, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,758 posts, read 24,253,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalUID View Post
I'd argue that most majors can be made practical under the right circumstances or in the right environment. Even English Lit majors are valuable in areas of the business where communicating a strong message is important. Many corporate legal departments are composed of both attorneys and a plethora of liberal arts majors who work beside them. One of our Ops managers has a BFA. Our former director had a BA in English. These can be valuable backgrounds in areas of the business that require a lot of writing, communication, and putting together presentation materials. Most engineers or accountants sure as hell don't want to do this type of work.

When people say how they can't fathom what one does with one of these degrees, I just assume they've had very little experience working in Corporate America, at large companies, or at many different organizations at all. In nearly two decades of experience, I've worked alongside with all sorts of pedigrees and backgrounds (many of which were in the liberal arts, fine arts, and social sciences, too). If you are deeply passionate about writing or communications, then you can certainly make a career out of that. Probably not at Mom&Pop Plumbing Co., but somewhere like Amazon, Meta, JPMorgan Chase, Deloitte, or any other organization that has a plethora of departments and talent needs.
Thank you for being more broadminded than many of our posters about this.
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Old 11-29-2023, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
13,057 posts, read 7,491,199 times
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From our experience,
Those kids who really want to do STEM, will figure out a way to get it done.
If government doesn't want STEM promoted in the grades and universities, then private industry steps in to fulfill their needs.
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Old 11-29-2023, 12:07 PM
 
6,985 posts, read 7,039,625 times
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This thread also got me thinking that there is a huge difference between K-12 STEM teachers vs STEM college professors, and that could be what is turning people off. Many K-12 STEM teachers have no real interest in STEM, and they dislike STEM-oriented students, and tend to favor the popular kids, athletes, and the typical teachers pet types. On the other hand, college professors are so called "experts" in their field, who are focused on research, and really do not care about teaching at all. The topics that may be difficult to students are elementary to college professors. And, they tend to be the types to have the gatekeeper / weedout mentality who want to weed out anybody who doesn't think the same as them. The students who were favored by the K-12 STEM teachers will be turned off and eventually weeded out by the college professors. And whose who would have connected with the college professors had already been turned off by the K-12 teachers.
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Old 11-29-2023, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
50,758 posts, read 24,253,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
From our experience,
Those kids who really want to do STEM, will figure out a way to get it done.
If government doesn't want STEM promoted in the grades and universities, then private industry steps in to fulfill their needs.
Right now we pretty much have 50 relatively independent agencies (state ed departments) with no coordinated plan, and in many cases no state plan, to promote wise career choices based on what our nation needs. The self-interest of private industry will never lead to a coordinated program.
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Old 11-29-2023, 12:15 PM
 
Location: In your head
1,075 posts, read 552,260 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
This thread also got me thinking that there is a huge difference between K-12 STEM teachers vs STEM college professors, and that could be what is turning people off. Many K-12 STEM teachers have no real interest in STEM, and they dislike STEM-oriented students, and tend to favor the popular kids, athletes, and the typical teachers pet types. On the other hand, college professors are so called "experts" in their field, who are focused on research, and really do not care about teaching at all. The topics that may be difficult to students are elementary to college professors. And, they tend to be the types to have the gatekeeper / weedout mentality who want to weed out anybody who doesn't think the same as them. The students who were favored by the K-12 STEM teachers will be turned off and eventually weeded out by the college professors. And whose who would have connected with the college professors had already been turned off by the K-12 teachers.
This is kind of a bizarre assessment. My wife taught Chem/Physics for nearly a decade and enjoyed every moment of it until the end when she was just needing something new. Most of her colleagues had also been teaching the subject for around the same time and always geeked out about the new experimentations and demos they'd set up for the new year. My math and science teachers in high school were incredibly passionate about the subjects they taught. I still remember some of their enthusiastic lectures to this day, and it's been 20+ years.
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Old 11-29-2023, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
13,057 posts, read 7,491,199 times
Reputation: 9787
^#147, Overly general.

Nothing wrong with the perceived weeding out process.
Do we want scientists, engineers and technicians and less than very good in what they do?
Would be huge waste of time and money for everyone, if we have people who either can't cut it.
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