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Old 01-27-2024, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
13,070 posts, read 7,502,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
That would be nice.
Tabasco makes anything taste better.
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Old 01-27-2024, 11:07 AM
 
19,777 posts, read 18,069,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
After one of our long-serving guidance directors retired, he would still come back to visit almost every Thursday because that was the day the cafeteria served what he considered to be the best pasta he ever ate. While I'll admit it was edible, I could only assume he married a woman who couldn't cook at all.
Astonishing.
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Old 01-27-2024, 11:10 AM
 
19,777 posts, read 18,069,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
Tabasco makes anything taste better.
100%. However, over unusually long middle school career we A. not offered hot sauce. B. not smart enough to bring our own.
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Old 01-27-2024, 11:18 AM
 
12,841 posts, read 9,041,939 times
Reputation: 34899
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
It's good to hear!

Getting back to grammar school lunches, every so often there is an article on the high quality of European school lunches versus US school lunches. School lunches focus on the most commonly available foods in each country. Kids eat foods they know. If it's unfamiliar, lunch gets tossed.

European restaurants don't have children meals. Children eat adult foods. There is no concept of a chicken nuggets as a substitute for an adult meal. If the parents eat escargot or artichokes, then the kids do.

Children's menus are a weirdness in US culture. Yes, school lunches are horrible and should be better.
Kids will eat and enjoy adult foods if given to them. On time my oldest ordered the seared ahi tuna in a seafood restaurant and the waitress kept arguing that wasn't a kid's meal and would be a waste because a kid wouldn't eat it unless it was fried and well done. It took an argument from me for her to even take the order and she still had the chef overcook it since it was for a kid. My oldest was so frustrated with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
Tabasco makes anything taste better.
Not enough Tabasco in Louisiana to fix my school's lunches.
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Old 01-27-2024, 01:08 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,705 posts, read 58,022,681 times
Reputation: 46172
from
science and engineering

to primary school lunches...

Our country school lunch program did a good job of preparing students for the Marines!

Food was excellent, but our very large statue principle stood guard at the lunch tray return station, you better clean EVERYTHING up, or you sat right there and completed your meal. (There was a pail in case you needed to throw-up.) But you WOULD clean up the tray 100%.

When we transitioned from glass milk bottles to cardboard, everyone had to open the cartons so he could verify no food was stashed in there.

Since it was 3 flights of steps carrying your trays (up and down) it was a tedious and orderly march every lunch time.

I envied those who got fed at school, we couldn't afford it (.25 IIRC), so we had to make and bring our own lunch. Parents were gone before we got up. And definately were not gonna fix our breakfast, lunch (or supper). Many days there was nothing, as we had to forego food to meet payroll. Several of our parent's employees' kids were able to afford school lunches. It was good training for college (ramen! / no meal plan).

Today is gravy (except for social ills)

Probably need more 'old-school' counselors / psychologists .... "This is how life is... get-over-it"
science and engineering,
1) Takes effort, initiative
2) Join the military and hope you get a desireable assignment. If not... there is always the GI Bill.

Fortunately, I missed the 'Entitlement train', as did nearly all my peers and coworkers (Vietnam era / mandatory Conscription.). A dear friend, classmate, and carpool from my employer and STEM college (company paid) was a Vietnam refugee who helped fund and start 30 orphanages and an HIV hospital (in her free time). She just passed away (age 67). Those with intiative and incentive excel everyday (in USA), In spite of the barriers. There is still Mandatory Consription in Vietnam, as in many countries I worked and hired excellent STEM grads.

Just met with several ex-coworkers. Every one of them is excellent at engineering, and accomplished a lot, with very little. every one had served in the military and got their STEM education via GI Bill or ROTC. None were 'momma pay' college grads.

Maybe the USA has regressed to using the wrong formula for inspiring youth to go into science and engineering?
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Old 01-27-2024, 08:32 PM
 
Location: WA
5,442 posts, read 7,733,177 times
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Here is an excellent read from this month's Atlantic that relates quite well to this thread. This is gift link so should work:

Welding Won’t Make You Rich: Is a lucrative college-free job too good to be true?

https://www.theatlantic.com/educatio...campaign=share

EDIT: Actually I see now it is a 2019 article that they promoted back up to their front page. But it is still a good read and still relevant.
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Old 01-27-2024, 08:51 PM
 
28,665 posts, read 18,775,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
Here is an excellent read from this month's Atlantic that relates quite well to this thread. This is gift link so should work:

Welding Won’t Make You Rich: Is a lucrative college-free job too good to be true?

https://www.theatlantic.com/educatio...campaign=share

EDIT: Actually I see now it is a 2019 article that they promoted back up to their front page. But it is still a good read and still relevant.

My best friend and I graduated from high school. I went to college. He became a welder. He never got a "degree," but he did his time working to "master" and took the additional courses to learn welding exotic metal. Through the 70s and 80s he was one of a handful of people who could repair oil drill bits in the field. Oil companies losing thousands of dollars an hour would call him in a panic, not even asking his fee, only asking his immediate availability: "Can we send a helicopter for you right now?" Then he just named his fee.

Yeah, he retired 20 years before I did.

We were both lucky in our own ways having been Boomers in an economy that was still booming for a good part of our working lives.

My children have had it a lot tougher, even with college. In no way can they think of themselves as being irreplaceable at any job they've held. Nobody has ever called them asking, "Can we send a helicopter for you right now?"

Obviously, there is a whole lot of variance in what a person learns and what a person does with what they learn, as well as the current economic environment they're in. If I were just graduating with the same major I graduated with 50 years ago, I'd be unable to live on my own today.

Global labor economy? AI? Computer programming isn't even a safe haven these days. There is no broad one-size-fits-all right answer such as "Just go to college and you'll be able to make a good living."

And nobody is saying that high school is enough without extensive additional technical training.
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Old 01-27-2024, 10:33 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,705 posts, read 58,022,681 times
Reputation: 46172
Freakonomics also had a relevant podcast regarding college choice (pitfalls) and opportunities. (And the bizarre higher education finance schemes and outcomes)

I took an afternoon off from my PT welding job, to interview at my LT employer for a technical skilled trades opening.
My 3 coworkers were killed(1) injured (2) in a welder caused grain explosion that afternoon, so I needed to find a new job anyway. (I was already working graveyard at my LT employer), so... I added college as my day gig, and took a more technical job at employer.

Far more of my friends went vocational, than professional. The worker bees are far more fun and most (who remain alive) are as successful. Probably equal numbers have died. The professionals seem to have the prolonged medical issues, but that is not surprising in the USA, where more $$$ = more HC access. The rest of us just die. +/-, often from the consequences of life choices. Some by the risk of their employment, many by the risks of their employment social scene. (Oil field workers, rodeo, entertainment industry and politics has some very risky social behaviors). Truck drivers and factory worker social ills healed a lot with mandatory drug and alcohol testing. I am still randomly tested several times / yr. CDL requires me to be enrolled in drug cohort.
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Old 01-28-2024, 08:41 AM
 
7,334 posts, read 4,124,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Freakonomics also had a relevant podcast regarding college choice (pitfalls) and opportunities.

One of the best Freakonomics I heard was about education. Before women's rights, the best job (only job) for a smart woman was a teacher. Once other fields opened up to women, the smartest women became lawyers, doctors, etc. As the smartest women left the teaching field, the quality of American education went down.

Of course, I can't make generalizations as many educators, like my daughter, graduated college with honors. However, according to Freakonomics it's rarer than a century ago.
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Old 01-28-2024, 08:50 AM
 
14,400 posts, read 14,295,538 times
Reputation: 45727
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
One of the best Freakonomics I heard was about education. Before women's rights, the best job (only job) for a smart woman was a teacher. Once other fields opened up to women, the smartest women became lawyers, doctors, etc. As the smartest women left the teaching field, the quality of American education went down.

Of course, I can't make generalizations as many educators, like my daughter, graduated college with honors. However, according to Freakonomics it's rarer than a century ago.
I remember that one. Another one that stayed with me was data indicating that the crime rate has probably gone down because women had access to the right of abortion and could avoid giving birth in difficult financial and other circumstances.
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