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Old 01-29-2024, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
51,026 posts, read 24,528,151 times
Reputation: 33040

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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
Good point! I live in Pennsylvania and we have 500 school districts. Other than Philadelphia, we have no county school districts. Some of the school districts in PA have less than 300 students. That's less than 23 in a class. The school boards have little understanding of what goes on in schools because they are not there. They meet at night and approve critical decisions like approving a cafeteria worker from part-time to full-time status. Check your school board minutes. Many of the monthly meetings are over in 30 minutes. At the other extreme is the current trend to ban books in school libraries.

In the case of PA, we would be better off if smaller, more rural counties moved to county school districts.
I've worked under both 'community schools districts' and county school districts, and there is no question in my mind that county is the better of the two.
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Old 01-29-2024, 01:55 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
43,376 posts, read 18,487,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
More recently, yes. And again those came out of elected representatives and their appointees.
Well they defined the curriculum for the nation's K-12 schools for the past 20+ years.
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Old 01-29-2024, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
51,026 posts, read 24,528,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
Well they defined the curriculum for the nation's K-12 schools for the past 20+ years.
So?
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Old 01-29-2024, 03:04 PM
 
12,891 posts, read 9,135,483 times
Reputation: 35037
CW
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
That's not the point. We're talking about who makes the big decisions. And that is state and local boards of education.

I know...democracy is messy.
I understand. It's hard to accept responsibility. But until professional educators start accepting responsibility for their product, the problems will continue.

It's so much easier for you to blame things on parents, voters, school boards, etc. But the boards, Education Departments, and such don't create things out of whole cloth on a whim. Those things start in the Education Complex of unions, education theorists in universities, and other education professionals.

But who advises school boards at all levels on what decisions to make? Education professionals.

Who develops the policies that the school boards use? Education professionals.

Who advocates for those policies? Education professionals.

Who implements the policies? Education professionals.

There's a common theme running throughout our education system, at all levels from local districts to the ED.

Now I know that not all education professionals refuse to acknowledge education's responsibilities. I work with some of the ones who acknowledge the problems in our education system. Most have paid a price for not towing the "party line" and speaking out on the problems that exist.
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Old 01-29-2024, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
51,026 posts, read 24,528,151 times
Reputation: 33040
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
CW

I understand. It's hard to accept responsibility. But until professional educators start accepting responsibility for their product, the problems will continue.

It's so much easier for you to blame things on parents, voters, school boards, etc. But the boards, Education Departments, and such don't create things out of whole cloth on a whim. Those things start in the Education Complex of unions, education theorists in universities, and other education professionals.

But who advises school boards at all levels on what decisions to make? Education professionals.

Who develops the policies that the school boards use? Education professionals.

Who advocates for those policies? Education professionals.

Who implements the policies? Education professionals.

There's a common theme running throughout our education system, at all levels from local districts to the ED.

Now I know that not all education professionals refuse to acknowledge education's responsibilities. I work with some of the ones who acknowledge the problems in our education system. Most have paid a price for not towing the "party line" and speaking out on the problems that exist.
No.

America, as a nation has to accept responsibility for not being able to work together, using compromise, to determine curriculum and methods, and stop making educators pawns in the national drama.

The common thread is not what you proclaim, it's that we, as a society, can no longer work together in almost any field of endeavor. And your posts exemplify that mindset.
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Old 01-29-2024, 04:18 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
43,376 posts, read 18,487,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
So?
So maybe the fault lies with them regarding the topic of this thread.

I just don't think fixing food and poverty will inspire more to go into science and engineering.
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Old 01-29-2024, 04:19 PM
 
Location: NMB, SC
43,376 posts, read 18,487,721 times
Reputation: 35132
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
No.

America, as a nation has to accept responsibility for not being able to work together, using compromise, to determine curriculum and methods, and stop making educators pawns in the national drama.

The common thread is not what you proclaim, it's that we, as a society, can no longer work together in almost any field of endeavor. And your posts exemplify that mindset.
But you first must admit you have a problem.

The Dept of Education thinks the nation is doing great.
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Old 01-29-2024, 04:58 PM
 
14,438 posts, read 14,382,622 times
Reputation: 45881
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
Good point! I live in Pennsylvania and we have 500 school districts. Other than Philadelphia, we have no county school districts. Some of the school districts in PA have less than 300 students. That's less than 23 in a class. The school boards have little understanding of what goes on in schools because they are not there. They meet at night and approve critical decisions like approving a cafeteria worker from part-time to full-time status. Check your school board minutes. Many of the monthly meetings are over in 30 minutes. At the other extreme is the current trend to ban books in school libraries.

In the case of PA, we would be better off if smaller, more rural counties moved to county school districts.
Consolidating school districts has the potential for saving a lot of money. The two problems are the public has been lead to believe this is the "road to socialism" and the administrators involved don't want to lose their jobs, so they do what they can to scuttle talk about district consolidation.
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Old 01-29-2024, 05:01 PM
 
14,438 posts, read 14,382,622 times
Reputation: 45881
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
But you first must admit you have a problem.

The Dept of Education thinks the nation is doing great.
I remember the report "A Nation at Risk" that was commissioned by Secretary of Education Terrell Bell and prepared by a commission headed by David Gardiner who coincidentally was President of the University of Utah while I attended from 1977 to 1981. This was done during the Reagan Presidency. The report explained the weaknesses in the American educational system in some detail. The problem is not a lot was done about them after the report came out.
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Old 01-29-2024, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Sun City West, Arizona
51,026 posts, read 24,528,151 times
Reputation: 33040
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
So maybe the fault lies with them regarding the topic of this thread.

I just don't think fixing food and poverty will inspire more to go into science and engineering.
I agree with that.

One of the problems is that quite a few of our posters don't want teachers and schools to push students in any particular direction...unless it's the direction they approve of.
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